26/07/2014
Status Report
Government Resolutions
Post Disaster Rehabilitation
  Project Related Rehabilitation
  International (ECMWF)
  India
  Regional
 
IMD - Mumbai
 

District - Aurangabad

Introduction

As a part of the overall preparedness of the state, the Government of Maharashtra has a State Disaster Management Action Plan to support and strengthen the efforts of the district administration. In this context, every district has evolved it's own District Disaster Management Action Plan (DDMAP). It is expected that these multi-hazard response plans would increase the effectiveness of administrative intervention.

Multi-disaster Response Plan

The DDMAP addresses the districts’ response to disaster  situations such as earthquakes, floods, cyclones, epidemics,   off-site industrial disasters and roads accidents and fires. Some of these disasters  such as floods and earthquakes affect large areas causing extensive damage to life, property and environment while others such as epidemics only  affect large populations. In any case, the management of these disasters requires extensive resources and manpower for containment by remedial action.

The present  plan is a multi-hazard response plan for the  disasters and outlines the institutional framework required for managing such situations. However, the plan assumes a disaster specific form  in terms of  the actions to be taken by the various agencies involved in the disaster. The front-end or  local level of any disaster response organisation will differ  depending upon the  type of disaster, but at the level of the back-end i.e., at the controlling level at the district  it will almost remain same, for all types of disasters.

Objectives

The objectives of the District Disaster Management Action Plan are :

·         To improve preparedness at the district level, through risk and vulnerability analysis , to disasters and to minimise the impact of disasters in terms of human, physical and material loss.

·         To ascertain the status of existing resources and facilities available with the various agencies involved in the management of disasters  in the district  and make it an exercise in capability building of district administration. This enables the district to face a disaster in a more effective way and builds confidence across different segments of society. It will be a positive factor for long term development of the district.

·         To utilise different aspects of disaster mitigation for development planning as a tool for location and area specific planning for development in the district.

·         To use scientific and technological advances in Remote Sensing, GIS etc. in preparation of this plan with a view to ensure their continuous use for development planning.

·         To develop a framework for proper documentation of future disasters in the district, to have an update on critical information essential to a plan, to critically analyse and appraise responses and to recommend appropriate strategies

·         To evolve DDMAP as an effective managerial tool within the overall policy framework of Government of Maharashtra.

Response to disasters, in the absence of a defined plan,  would be arbitrary leading to overemphasis of some actions and  absence of other actions which could be critical. The objectives of any disaster management plan should be to localise a disaster and to the maximum extent possible contain it so as to minimise the impact on life, the environment and property. A formal plan for managing disasters is therefore necessary. This would include

a.      pre-planning a proper  sequence  of  response actions,

b.      allocation of responsibilities to the participating agencies,

c.      developing codes and standard operating procedures for various departments and relief agencies involved.

d.      inventory of existing facilities and resources

e.      mechanisms for effective management of resources

f.        co-ordination of all relief activities including those of NGOs to ensure a coordinated and effective response.

g.      Co-ordination with the State response machinery for appropriate support

h.      Monitoring and evaluation of actions taken during relief and rehabilitation

"Outline of Vulnerability Assessment" prepared by CSSD/EMC has been used as the basic instrument to collate district level information to meet the database requirements for the preparation of DDMAP.


Policy Statement

The underlying policy of the DDMAP is to protect life, environment and property while ensuring mitigation  of  the disaster to the maximum extent possible, relief to those affected  and restoration of  normalcy at the earliest.

Essentially, communities  draw their support from the social institutions, administrative structure, and values and aspirations they cherish. Disasters may temporarily disorganise the social units and the administrative system and disrupt their lives built around these values and aspirations. A systematic effort to put back the social life on its normal course with necessary technology support and resources will contribute significantly to the resilience of the community and nation. 

This policy forms the basis of the DDMAP strategy. It aims at  capacity building and prompt utilization of resources in a disaster situation through a partnership of the GOM, NGOs, Private Initiatives and the community. In pursuance with this policy, DDMAP  addresses itself to strengthening the pre-disaster and post-disaster responses of various actors and stakeholders including the “victims” of the disaster.

OVERVIEW OF AURANGABAD DISTRICT

 Location

Aurangabad district is located in central north part of Maharashtra state and is the Headquarters of the Aurangabad  Division  which is also called Marathwada  region.

The district lies between 19 18’  20 40’ North Latitude and 74 40’ and 76 40’ longitudes.

This district is bounded by Jalna district to the east  , Nasik & Ahmednagar  districts to the west , Jalgaon district to the north  & Beed district to the south.

Aurangabad  district is well connected by Air to Delhi  & State Headquarters , Mumbai and other major districts.

Mumbai is about 375 kms .from the district Headquarters.

 
Area & Administrative
 

Divisions

Aurangabad district covers an area of 10,107 sq kms. which is 3.28% of the area of the Taluka.

Eight Taluka of the district are placed under 3 revenue sub-divisions viz.

           Sub-division                              Talukas incorporated in it

Aurangabad                                  Aurangabad & Paithan

Vaijapur                                       Vaijapur , Khuldabad & Gangapur 

Sillod                                            Sillod , Kannad & Soegaon

There are 1344 Villages , 831 Gram Panchayats , 8 Panchayat Samitis  6 Municipal councils , 1 Municipal corporation and 1 Cantonment Board in the above eight Taluka.

Salient Physical Features and Land Use Patterns.

 Physical Features

The district is seated mainly in the Godavari valley area.

The district is the part of the Deccan Plateau like other  districts  of the region sloping south east wards from the Sahyadris.

The district may be broadly divided in three geographical region viz . Godavari basin , northern piedmont slopes & the Ajanta plateau.

The height of the south part ranges between 520 & 575 meters while its north part records 600 - 675 meters.

The Agricultural land in the southern Talukas is poor while that in the north direction particularly along the bank is rich for the purpose of cultivation.

The quality of ground water   for household as well as Agriculture purpose is very good over most part of the district. But the water table  in recent years has gone down considerably due to insufficient annual rainfall . The water table is existing between depths of 20’ to 230’ or beyond.


 
Land Use patterns

Land Use/Land Cover category

Area in Hectares

Inhabited Area

47600

Agricultural Area

799900

Industrial Area

15800

Forest Cover

79400

Wastelands

65000

Drought prone area

793200


Soil

The predominant soil cover is Black, clayey, alkaline in reaction, clay loam in texture, fairly high in the content of calcium carbonate, fairly well supplied with nitrogen, low in available phosphate and available potash

Geology  and  Geomorphology

Geology

The Deccan Trap covers the entire district. The vesicular zeolitic traps are quite conspicuous filled by secondary silica in the form of Amethyst and Agate. The lava flows in the district are of the Pahoehoe type.

The major rivers have deposited alluvium along their course. The thickness is restricted to 10 to 15 m. The thickness is more along the river Shivana.

The geological sequence in the district is as given below.

            ________________________________________________________________

    Formation                           Age                                    Lithology

________________________________________________________________

Alluvial Deposits            Recent to sub-recent            Clay, silt, kankar and Sand

Deccan Trap                Cretaceous-Eocene              Lava flow consist of

                                                                                    massive & vesicular flows     

                                                                                     massive Trap & vesicular     

                                                                                    Trap.

             ________________________________________________________________

Geomorphology

Since the entire district is covered by the Deccan Traps, trappean landforms predominate the geomorphology of the district. These trappean landforms have been delineated into three categories depending on the degree of dissection :

Highly Dissected Plateau : The area along the northern boundary and forming part of the Ajanta hills. The water divide of the Godavari and Purna sub-basin also forms the highly dissected plateau which occurs in the central part of the district having a NW-SE trend.

Moderately Dissected Plateau : Covers major part of the district and is confined to middle reaches of the major valleys.

Slightly Dissected Plateau : Forms a very small part of the district along the Godavari. The area has a gentle slope and good soil cover.

Denudational hills with steep slopes, thin soil cover and scanty vegetation are found in concentration in the NE part of the district.


Climate  and Rainfall

The  climate of the district is characterized by a hot summer & general dryness throughout the year except during the south west monsoon seasons.

The year may be divided in to four seasons (I) the coldest season from  December to February (ii) Hot season starts from March and ends in May (iii) the period from June to September constitutes the south west monsoon & (iv) October to November form the post monsoon season.

The coldest spell of temperature recorded in the district generally found to be  between  4 & 9  Celsius which mostly occurs in January.

The maximum temperature in the district touches 41 C.

Even if the average rainfall of the district is 718 mm , the rainfall in Vaijapur & Gangapur is the lowest in the district. The maximum rainfall occurs in Khuldabad Taluka.( upto 1000 mm).

Temperature record for 1997 in Aurangabad District


                                                      Maximum            Month     Minimum       Month


            1986                                      39.9                 May         11.2                Dec.

            1987                                      38.8                 April       11.1                 Dec.

            1988                                      40.7                 May         10.1                Dec.               

            1989                                      40.1                 May         10.6                Jan.

            1990                                      38.5                 April        10.5                Jan.

            1991                                      40.0                 May         10.4                Dec.                                   

            1992                                      40.3                 May         10.0                Jan.

            1993                                      40.4                 May           9.7                Dec.

            1994                                      40.0                 May         10.0                Dec.

            1995                                      38.0                May           9.9                 Jan.


Rainfall (in mm ) since 1987 in Aurangabad District.

Sr.    Year            Normal            Annual     Maximum    Month during         Month having

No.                      Rainfall           Rainfall     Rainfall       which maximum     maximum

                                                                                          Rainfall occcurs     continuous Rainfall

1.   1987                726                  814.8                               Aug./Sept.             Aug./Sept.

2.   1988                726                  992.3                               Aug./Sept.             Aug./Sept.

3.   1989                726                  828.0                               Aug./Sept.             Aug./Sept.

4.   1990                726                  886.0                               Aug./Sept.             Aug./Sept.

5.   1991                734                  639.0                               Aug./Sept.             Aug./Sept.    

6.   1992                734                  662.0                               Aug./Sept.             Aug,/Sept. 

7.   1993                734                  678.0                               Aug./Sept.             Aug./Sept.

8.   1994                734                  567.0                               Aug./Sept.             Aug./Sept.

9.   1995                734                  497.0                         Aug./Sept              Aug./Sept.

Rainfall during Monsoon season of 1995

Sr.    Name of Centre                              Rainfall during (mm)


1                2                                                3            4                 5             6


1.     Aurangabad City                                78         104           117         263                

2.     Chikalthana (Aerodrum)                     86          105             79         150

3.     Khultabad                                            40          132            181        117

4.     Kannad                                                35           101              59          98

5.    Soegaon                                              202          157              75          36

6.    Sillod                                                  103          194              28          77

7.    Paithan                                                 62          132             102        130      

8.    Gangapur                                              73            56              63        240

9.    Vaijapur                                               14            65             121       118

District Total                                            77           116               89        136


Socioeconomic Features


Demographic Features

The total geographical area of the district is 10100  sq.kms which corresponds  3.28 % of the  total area of the state. Considering area , Aurangabad Tahsil is the largest covering 1610.6    sq.kms while Soegaon Tahsil is the smallest Tahsil with an area of 650.9 sq.kms.

The total no. of households is 3.84 lakhs. Out of which 2.61 lakhs are in rural area & 1.23 lakhs in urban area.

The total population of the district according to 1991 census is 22.14 lakhs which is 2.80 % of the total population of Maharashtra.

The total population living in the rural area constitutes 67.25 % while in urban area 32.75 % population is concentrated.

The total male & female population in the district is  respectively  52.03 %  and 47.97  % of the districts total population.

Assuming the  growth rate during the decade 1981 - 1991 (i.e. 396 per thousand per year ) the districts population is likely to touch 30 lakhs by 2000 AD.

The density of the population of a district is 219 per sq.km. Aurangabad Taluka is thickly populated ( density  515  per sq.km) is the biggest in the district. Whereas Soegaon Taluka  is the smallest , density being 119    per sq.km.

The Scheduled castes & Scheduled Tribes account for 13.79 % & 3.77 % respectively.

The percentage of main workers is 40.04 % while the marginal workers are about 2.66 %.

The strength of workforce in Government & Local self government is given in Table No. 4.6.

The overall Literacy Rate in the district is 56.98 % . Male literacy rate is 72.93 5 while the female literacy rate is only 39.64 %.

There are 7 urban centers in the district including one Municipal corporation. Details are given on following page.

There are in all 26 major rural growth centers having more than 5000 population.

Urban Locations in  Aurangabad District

 Sr         Name of the         Population        Population                  Major occupational patterns

 No.      Urban centre         in lakhs            Density                         as percentage to population001

                                            (1991 census)            sq.km                      ----- ----------------------------------

                                                                                                        Agri.      Industry    Trans    Trade &

                                                                                                                                         Port       Commerce

     

  1.     Aurangabad                     5.93            11737                     2.36         7.42        2.19        5     

   2.     Khultabad                      0.09               564                         11.11                     11.11

   3.         Kannad                        0.20               1242                          5               5          5

 

   4.     Sillod                            0.29                1540                      10.34          3.45      3.45           6.9

   5.    Paithan                         0.28                1535                      10.71         3.57                       7.14

 

   6. Gangapur                      0.17                 1649                      17.64                                       7.14

   7. Vaijapur                        0.30              3795                            6.66           6.66      3.33           6.66


 Major Rural Centres ( Population more than 5000 )

Name of Rural Centre

Population

(in lakhs)

Population

Density

Major Occupational patterns (as % of population)

 

 

 

 Culti -

Vators

Agri.

Labourers

Household

Ind.

Others

Aurangabad Taluka

Phulambri

10447

254

14.05

9.87

3.02

12.17

Ganori

5041

144

21.64

18.92

0.17

5.73

Lad Sawangi

5468

273

25.25

14.16

0.16

8.47

Kannad Taluka

Karanjkheda

6809

289

19.32

18.56

1.10

3.47

Kannad

8613

538

1.08

1.94

0.08

27.00

Deogaon

2683

236

10.80

14.68

1.55

11.00

Shafepur

6561

408

2.23

0.32

2.01

38.79

Sillod Taluka

Ghatnandra

6805

243

14.70

11.83

0.01

6.86

Undangaon

6983

317

18.15

23.84

0.04

7.26

Ajantha

10865

987

7.41

20.17

0.11

12.63

Shivana

9092

245

15.12

17.56

0.03

6.43

Bhradi

5082

564

17.24

14.72

0.45

9.46

Andhari

5851

208

20.95

16.08

0.21

5.61

Bhawan

5497

610

8.70

7.20

--

15.71

Soegaon Taluka

Soegaon

5952

661

12.18

18.85

0.02

10.36

Foadapur

5119

213

16.08

17.11

0.59

8.16

Paithan Taluka

Bidkin

9494

215

10.96

12.43

0.84

16.22

Pimpalwadi

6801

453

3.45

13.43

0.50

17.02

Mudhalwadi

5279

754

4.39

30.67

--

13.66

Katpur

6007

1001

2.43

7.66

0.37

19.14

Vihamandava

7715

266

10.76

18.55

12.96

35.84

Navgaon

5669

246

18.35

20.41

0.55

4.92

Gangapur Taluka

Jamgaon

7313

252

7.63

13.29

0.49

18.47

Vaijapur Taluka

Borsar

7065

371

12.09

22.18

0.04

0.99

Khandala

6948

182

18.68

14.15

0.10

8.43

Shivar

8036

206

20.86

12.52

1.82

10.92



 Historical & Religious Centres

Sr.       Name of the                          Period of Festive           Estimated  tourists

 No.      Historical and                       occasions months                or visiting population

             Religious centres                                                                  (In lakhs)    

             & nearest Urban/                                                                

             Major Rural centre

  1.      Shedra  : (Aurangabad)                  March/April                                   0.25

  2.      Verul    : (Khultabad)                     Feb./March                         1.00

  3.       Khultabad                                     Dec./Jan.                                       1.00       

  4.       Paithan                                          Feb./March                                    2.00

  5.      Savangi(Bazar) : (A’bad)               March/April                        0.20

  6.      Anwa   : (Sillod)                            Feb./March                          0.20

  7.      Dhotra  : (Sillod)                           Feb./March                          0.50

  8.      Kannad                                          Feb./March                                    0.50

  9.      Pishore : (Kannad)                         April                                               0.25

10.      Lasur   : (vaijapur)                         Feb./March                                     0.50

11.      Mahaismal  : (Khultabad)               Feb./March                                    0.25

12.      Padali   :     (Khultabad)                March                                             0.10

 
Agriculture  and Cropping Pattern

The economy of the district is predominantly agriculture. Of the total geographical area of 10.13 lakhs  Hectares , the land under cultivation is 7.55 lakhs Hectares i.e. 74.53%. The area under irrigation works out to 16.42 % of the total area under the crops.

There are in all 3.39 lakhs of khatedars in the district having 7.74 lakh hectares. The strength of small farmers ( having 1 to 2 Hectares as holding ) is 2 Lakhs or in other words , it is 59% of the total khatedars , in the district.

In general , kharif & Rabi are the two important agriculture seasons in the district but in area where irrigation facilities are available one more season viz. “ summer crops”, is in vogue. During kharif season foodgrains like Bajra , Jowar , Rice   & cash crops like groundnut  and sunflower are taken. In Rabi season  Jowar , Wheat and other grains are taken while in summer groundnut Maize ,sunflower are grown.

The Jayakwadi Project is the only completed major irrigation project in Paithan Taluka. Constructed on the bank of Godawari river. The area under command in Aurangabad district from the above project is 41 , 682 Hectares.

On completion of another project (Nandur- Madheshwar ) an additional area of 26000 & 16000 Hectares of land will come under the irrigation in Vaijapur and Gangapur Talukas respectively.


Types                     Crops                       Cropping period in months                        Market

                                                                                                                                Dist/state/ Export

Major Crops                Wheat                         March                                      Dist/State                                    Jowar                          to        

                                    Gram                           May

Major Crops                Rabi Jowar                  Dec     .                                   Dist/State

( Non-Irrigated)            Bajra ,Tur                    to

                                    Safflower                     Jan

Major  cash                 Sugarcane                  Nov. To Dec.                           Dist/State

Crops                                                             

Major Plantation          Banana                        Sept. To Feb.                         Dist/State



River Systems and Dams

The rivers in Aurangabad district may be grouped in to three major classes. One is the Godavari and Doodhna and their Tributaries , second is the Purna and Doodhna and their Tributaries, and the third is the Tributaries of the Tapi basin.

The important river Godavari happens to be the entire southern boundary running along 230 kms in the district . The main tributaries are Kalnadi , Narangi , Shivna ,Kham Yelganga , Shivbhadra ,Yelbhadra ,Galhati and Musa .

The Nathsagar Dam on the Godavari river along the southern boundary of the district is the largest surface reservoir in the district.

Besides this there are 9 medium irrigation projects and a large number of minor irrigation tanks.

Industries

In Aurangabad the industrial sector has developed at the fastest speed compare to any other parts in Maharashtra during 1981 -1991 and as on today also the tempo is high towards expansion.

At present 3 big complexes viz. Near Railway Station , Chikalthana & Waluj are existing where 2387 units are registered providing employment to 13901 workers .A fourth five star complex near Shendra village on Aurangabad Jalna road is coming up fast.

Details of the industrialization in the district are given in the following tables :

No. of Industrial Estate                                                11

No. of co-operative Industrial Estates                          7         

Total work force in the Industries at                      13901                               

                Sr.NO. 3 above.                             

No. of Chemicals Industries out of                           251       

               3 above.                              

Pipelines carrying Chemicals

                        a) No. of routes                                             Nil

                        b) Length of lines(Mtrs.)                                Nil

No. of Potential Hazardous Locations                         5

No. of Vehicles carrying Hazardous           850 to 1000

raw-materials for industries.(During

a month)                                             

No. of Vehicles carrying Hazardous            400 to 500

Finished goods from Industries.

(During a month)                                            

No. of Vehicles passing through the         1600 to 1800                                

Dist. carrying hazardous material for

Industries at other places.(During a

month)                                                                                    

No. of container terminals                                       Nil.

No. of working factories and average daily employment in Aurangabad District.

                                                                                                                 (As on 31.3.96)

                               Working factories and average employment

Sr.No.        Types of Industries                       No.of factories             Average employment

1.   Food products                                                       61                                      356

2.   Beverages, Tobacco & Tobacco product                          -                                           -

3.   Cotton textiles                                                       58                                      413

4.   Wool, Silk & Synthetic textiles                              -                                         -    

5.   Jute, Hemp & Mesta textiles                                   -                                           -

6.   Textiles products (Including wearing                      -                                           -

      apparel other than foot wear)

7.   Wood and Wood products.(Furniture &            116                                      524            

       Fixtures.)

8.   Paper and Paper product (Print and                      -                                           -

       allied Industries)

9.   Leather and Leather product                               36                                      156

10. Rubber, Plastic, Petroleum &                            174                                      847            

      Coal product.       

11. Chemical and Chemical products                      251                                    1411           

      (Except product of Petroleum and

        Coal)

12. Non-Metallic mineral product.                             89                                      441

13. Basic metals and alloy Industries.                                    -                                            -

14. Metal products and parts (Except                     151                                      737 

       M/C and Trans. equi)                  

15. M/C, Machine, Tools and Parts                            -                                           -  

      (Except Electric.)

16. Electric Machinery, Apparatus                            72                                     396

17. Transport equipment and parts                            -                                          -

18. Other Manufacturing Industries                            -                                          -

19. Electricity/Electronic                                           40                                     193  

20. Gas and Steam.                                                    -                                          -   

21. Water works and supply                                       -                                          -

22. Others                                                             1189                                   7699  

23. Agro-based Industries                                       141                                     728

               Total                                                2387                           13901      

The Industries Work Of Which Is In Progress & Yet To Start Production

Sr             Category              Location       Type of               Probable                Month / Year

No                                                             Industry               employment          of  completion generation            

1.   Co-op. Industrial             Sillod       Engineering, Agro-              -                    -

      Estate                                               & Forest based                

                                                               Minerals-based,

                                                               Fabrication,

                                                               Food processing,

                                                               Textiles, Metal,

                                                               Chemical &

                                                               Leather,

                                                               Plastic, Elec-

                                                               -tronic & other.

                                                               Electricals.

                                                               Total units to be

                                                               Set up 85                             425                     1999

2.    Large and                    M.I.D.C.,              

        Medium Industries     Chikalthana,  As above 62 units    1240                     1999

                                            Waluj,           As above 62 units    2080               -”-

                                          Paithan,          As above 104 ”          200                -”-     

                                          Rly. Stn.         As above 104 ”          200               1998

                                            A’bad.



Industrial Estates Which Are Coming Up Soon.

Sr.                 Category              Location       Type of               Probable             Month / Year

No.                                                                       Industry           employment       by which

                                                                                                        generation           would be

                                                                                                                                         started.

1.    Gajanan Co-op Industrial    Lasur     Proposed Industrial      N.A.                   2000       

       Estate, Lasur Stn.                                         Estate

.

2.    Kankawati Co-op Indl.        Kannad           ---’’-----              N.A.                    --”--           

       Estate, Kannad.         

3.   Vaijapur Co-op. Indl.           Vaijapur           ----’’------           N.A.               --”--   

      Estate, Vaijapur.

4.   Shendra Five Star                 Shendra           ----”-----              N.A.                  1999

      Industrial Estate                                                                                                   902 sq.m.

                                                                                                                                  acquired

                                                                                                                                 by MIDC.

5.   Waluj Industrial Estate       Waluj             ------”----              N.A.                  1999  

      (Addl.)                                                                                                                1077 m² 

                                                                                                                                acquired

                                                                                                                                by MIDC.

Existing Industrial Estates In Aurangabad District  (As On 31-3-96)

Sr.    Name of the             Location           No. of Ind.    No. of                Total work force in

No.   Industrial Estate.     (Address)          in the            Major                 the Industry

                                                                        Estate           Hazardous                                                                                                                                            & Polluting

                                                                                            industries                                         

1.  Chikalthana            Chikalthana              419               5                              2819          

2.  Waluj                      Waluj                       536               4                              3796          

3.  Paithan                    Paithan                      59                1                               297           

4.  Railway. Station.   Rly. Station.                 45                4                               222           

5.  A’bad city &          A’bad. city &

     Taluka.                 Taluka                       1328                -                             6707          

6.  A’bad Co-op.         A-42, Rly. station       79                -                                395            

     Industrial Estate.     MIDC, area A’bad.

7.  Udyog Mitra           Chitegaon, A’bad.       6                 -                                 30            

     Co-op. Industrial

     Estate.                   

8.  Shankarswami        Shivoor, Tq. Vaijapur   4                -                                 20              

     Audyogik Co-op.

    Estate, Shivoor,

    Tq. Vaijapur.

9.  Siddeshwar Co-op.  Sillod.                        85                 -                               425          

     Industrial Estate,

    Sillod.     

                

Power  Stations  and  Electricity Installations

One power generation station at the Jayakwadi Irrigation Dam at Paithan is the only  project in the district  by which 12  mega volts electricity is generated.

The district had already achieved 100 % rural electrification target in 1990.

There are 10 132 kv stations & 28  33 kv sub - stations in the district.

The consumption of power in the district for various uses in terms of percentage in descending order is : Industrial : 46.0 % , Agriculture 36.00 % , Domestic : 10.00 % others 5.00 % and commercial 3.00 %.

Transport and Communication Network

The district is connected by Air service at the Chikalthana Airport , Jet planes and Air bus can land and takeoff.

By Railways , the district is well connected by state headquarters (Mumbai) ,Hyderabad and Banglore . There is 102 km Broadguage line and 8 Railway stations in the district.

The district has 5465 km surfaced road network. This includes 1075 of state highways (SH) , 1550 major district roads (MDR) , 1151 km other district roads (ODR) and 1529 km of village road (VR ).

In Aurangabad district there are in all  1,35,778 vehicles (ALL TYPES)  registered with the RTO as on 31.3.96 during the past year 11.12 % increase of new vehicles was recorded.

As regards the network of the state road transport bus service in the district , it has 7 bus Depots in the district. 511 buses plays on 620 different roots in the district . The daily average number of vehicles on road is 473.

On an average , 2.12 Lakh of passengers travel by MSRTC buses in the district .

There are 327 post offices and 20 Telegraph offices as on 1.3.1996  in the district.

There are 45 Telephone exchanges in the district. At the end of march 1996.  31,092 Telephones were working.

Two Doordarshan centres . - One at Aurangabad and another at Mahismal - are started in the district.

Proposed  Development

A number of irrigation schemes are in progress & many new schemes will be taken up in future in Aurangabad district .

One major project , “ Nandur Madheshwar Canal project “ is presently in progress

Similarly 8 medium irrigation projects are also in progress. They are likely to be completed by 1999. Likewise 4 large minor irrigation works are in progress and expected to be ready by 1999.

In the “ minor irrigation “ category 6 works are in progress while 14 works are proposed as future scheme.

Irrigation Projects in Aurangabad.(In Progress  & Future)

Category : (Major Projects)

Sr.    Name of the      Location     Year       River on     Catchment   Area       Pro-      Probable

No.   Project              (Taluka)      when      which         area Sq.km  Under    -posed   Year of

                                                    started    taken up                         Comm-    irriga-   Completion

                                                                                                              -and       -tion      

                                                                                                                  (Ha.)

  1          2                       3               4              5                     6             7             8                9

        In Progress

1.     Nandur               Nipad        1972-73  Godavari          -             43860     43860    June 2002

        Madhmeshwar                                     & its

        Canel                                                   Tributories

  

Category : (Medium  Irrigation Projects)

Sr.   Name of the      Location     Year       River on     Catchment     Area       Pro-      Probable

No.  Project              (Taluka)      when      which         area Sq.km   Under    -posed   Year of

                                                    started    taken up                           Comm-   irriga-   Completion

                                                                                                                   -and       -tion      

                                                                                                                  (Ha.)

  1          2                       3               4              5                     6             7             8                9

        In Progress

1.   Shivana Takli    Kannad      1983-84   Shivana           574.82       6600      6600    June 1999

                                                                   River

2.   Tembhapuri       Gangapur   1979-80   Nagzari           284.00       6378      4784    June 1998

 

3.   Purna Neopur    Kannad      1983-84   Purna              100.28       1695      1695    June 1998

4.   Anjana Palsi      Kannad      1976-77   Anjana              99.30       2030      2030    June 1999

5.   Wakod               Sillod        1994-95   Nazari &         133.60       2335      2335    June 1999 

                                                                   Kambli          

6.    Bor Bahegaon  Vaijapur    1983-84  Bor Nala            89.50      3117      3117    June 1999

                                                             (Shivna

                                                              Tributory)

7.    Nrangi              Vaijapur   1986-87    Deo Nala        176.30       1639      1639    June 1999

8.     Bramhagavan  Paithan     1981-82    Godavari            -             3205      3205    June 1997

Category : (Large Minor Irrigation Projects)

In Progress

1.   Sillegaon          Gangapur    1995       Martandi          57.25         1120       1120      1999

2.    Khari                Kannad      1995        Khari              104.00        1470       1470      1999

3.    Ravala              Soyegaon   1996        Meh Nala         23.53          750         750      1999

4.    Kherda             Paithan       1996        Virbhadra        60.00          970         970      1999

Category : (Minor Irrigation Projects)

Sr.   Name of the      Location     Year       River on     Catchment     Area       Pro-      Probable

No.  Project              (Taluka)      when      which         area Sq.km   Under    -posed   Year of

                                                    started    taken up                           Comm-   irriga-   Completion

                                                                                                                   -and       -tion      

                                                                                                                  (Ha.)

  1          2                       3               4              5                     6             7             8                9

        In Progress

1.    Jangla Tanda    Soygaon        1985      Gugadi             8.80           242          242       1997

2.    Tingapur          Soygaon        1985       Local Nala     13.02           380          380       1998

3.     Shivni             Paithan           1995       Shivni Nala   20.20           280          280      1998

4.    Kolwadi           Kannad          1995       Local Nala     18.13           351          351      1997-98

5.    Wadner            Kannad          1983       Local Nala     18.15           411          411      1997

6.    Gandheshwar   Khultabad      1996       Gun               47.30           487          487       1999

Future Irrigation Projects

1.    Itewadi           Aurangabad                     Local Nala    36.44          590           590       1998

2.    Pardari           Aurangabad                      -do-                17.50         420           420       1998

3.    Babuwadi       Aurangabad                     -do-                25.89         295           295       1998

4.    Hatmali          Aurangabad                      -do-               68.79         450           450       1999

5.    Sultanwadi    Aurangabad                       -do-               16.73         254           254       1999

6.    Ektuni            Paithan                              -do-               15.00         260           260       1999

7.    Kutubkheda   Paithan                              -do-               62.50         260           260       1999

8.   Athegaon-       Kannad                             -do-                12.75        255           255       1998

        -kedha

9.   Deopudi         Kannad                              -do-               14.00         522           522       1998

10.  Andhari         Sillod                                -do-               22.00          345           345       1999

11.  Nimkhedi      Soyegaon                          -do-                 7.77          262           262       1999   

12.  Savaladbara   -do-                                  -do-               20.84           590          590        2000

13.  Halda Jalki     Sillod                               -do-                 8.10           252          252        1998

14.   Pimpalwadi   Soyegaon                         -do-               14.86           427          427        1998



RISK AND VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT

 Economic, Social , Educational & Occupational Profile Of The  Population

The total  geographical area of the district is 10100  sq.kms ,which             constitute  3.28 % of the total area of Maharashtra state.

Based on area classification , Aurangabad  taluka is the largest with1610.6   sq.kms , while Soegaon  taluka is the smallest in the district with  650.9   sq.kms as its area.

In the rural areas , the agriculture is the core sector of the economy while in municipal corporation area & in urban agglomerations , industry & allied activities business & service are the other main sectors of economy of the district.

The major crops ( irrigated ) are  wheat , jowar & gram on food crop side and cotton on non food crop side. The cash crop is the sugarcane & banana . Of the crops ( un - irrigated ) Rabi , jowar Bajra, Tur & Sunflower are worth to mention.

The total population of the district according to 1991 census is 22.14 lakh which is 2.80    % of the total population of the state.

67.25 % population lives in rural area whereas 32.75 % population is in urban areas. The density of population of the district is 219 as against states 257 person/sq.km. As regards the density of the talukas it is Aurangabad  taluka which is most densely populated (515      person/sq.km ) while the taluka which has lowest density , is Soegaon taluka ( 119   persons/sq.km )

Scheduled caste & scheduled tribes account for 13.79 % and 3.79 % respectively of the total district population.

The total No.of households is 4.25 lakhs     of which 2.81 lakhs  live in rural area while 1.44 lakhs  live in urban area .

The percentage of main workers is  40.04 % while the marginal workers are about 2.66 % , of the main workers 41.20 %    are the cultivators 28.33 %    agriculture labour 8.92 %    small scale business  establishment & 21.55 %    in other activities.

The district is speedily growing to be a good & potential industrial place in the after Bombay , Pune , Sholapur , Nashik etc. During the passed decade it has gained prime place in starting major industries in & around Aurangabad city .

All other towns in the district are also growing fast towards industrialisation . There are one municipal corporation (Aurangabad ) & 6 municipalities in the district.

There are 26 rural growth centers having more than 5000 total population in those centers, major occupation of the residents are that of cultivation & Agriculture labor

The literacy rate in the district is 56.58 % & the district’s rank is at 21 in the state.

There are 786 Pre Primary Schools , 1673 Primary Schools , 320 Secondary Schools ,    24   Higher Secondary Schools , & 24 Colleges. There is one Govt. Medical college & one University in the district.

In 1994 -95 ,out of the total strength of 6.42 lakhs  students  in all the Institutions

( other then proffesional institutions ) 65.58  % in Primary Schools , 19.47  % in Secondary Schools , 4.51  %  in Higher Secondary Schools  & 6.23   % in Colleges.

As regards professional education 7 B.Ed Colleges , 2 Law Colleges , 4 English Colleges  & 24 other institutions are there in the district.

In all the strength of the girls students  is accounted for 42.48 % of  the total students.

Disaster Specific Proneness

Floods

The normal rain fall of the district is 734 mm. The annual rainfall recorded during the last decade shows that it was much less than the normal rain fall of the district . 1987, 1988,1989,1990 were the only 4 years when the annual rainfall had crossed the level of normal rainfall. The reading for these years being 814.8,992.3,828.0 & 886.0 mm respectively. Maximum rainfall occurs during August & September.

In Aurangabad  district, as the record shows, there has not been any major flood during the past two decades . Among the important rivers which flow within the district , Godavari river is the most important river . Before the construction of Jayakwadi Dam (a major project) on this river near Paithan town , there had been many floods , a few of them major floods all along the course of the river not only within Aurangabad district but in other districts also.

However there have been recurring small floods in the district due to flooding of villages/ localities in urban areas , due to sudden heavy rains in the catchment of the river/nallas flowing in the district.

There are  in all 16 rivers in the district. The Irrigation department  has constructed dams on many of these rivers which have already stopped the frequent flooding of the downstream villages. Still there are 92 villages which are likely to be affected due to floods. The area of  these villages  is approximately  (410) hectares and the total population is 1.5 lakh . The list of these villages is given in the annexure.

The information collected shows that of the major & medium projects completed in the district there are 2 towns & 136 villages lying in the down stream which bear risk of flood in case there happen to be any major damage or breach to these dams due to heavy rains in the respective catchment areas .

Emergency plans in respect of  the dam constructed or under construction are prepared & kept ready by the Irrigation Dept. The details of village  population & the areas likely to be affected are given in such plan alongwith the measures to be adopted in case there happens to be any such disaster.

The flooding of low lying localities in Aurangabad city and a few towns in Aurangabad district is also important. In Aurangabad city, in all 51 localities have been notified as having the risk of being flooded during rainy season due to heavy & unexpected showers.

The district administration has given 3rd  rank to the flood episode.

Road Accidents

In  Aurangabad  district  there is a good network of black topped sufaced roads. No National Highway passes through the district. The total length of the state highway passing through the district is 1074 kms. About 1560 km road length  falls under major district roads. Besides 2954 km road length is that of Zilla Parishad.

A number of rivers flow through the district , requiring construction  of bridges over the roads.  There are  in all 491 bridges in the district.

Due to presence of hill ranges in the district, some state highways & major  district roads have to pass through  “ Ghats” or hill roads. These Ghats- one on Aurangabad-Jalgaon road near Chauka village & one on Aurangabad -Mumbai road near Daulatabad village are having considerable elevations and have many sharp turns which make them dangerous  for smooth traffic. Moreover the road width is narrow and there are many sharp turns with steep gradients. Many accidents have taken place in these ghats in the past.

The industrial expansion in Aurangabad in the last decade was beyond expectation and speedily. Major industries have come up near Chikalthana and Waluj complexes. One more new site at Shendra village is coming up which is very near to Chikalthana industrial area. There are about 2500 factories with about 14000 workers in the district. The goods traffic by road from Mumbai and Pune sides enters the city through Mumbai-Aurangabad route only even if it has to go upto Chikalthana. Even the traffic meant for Hyderabad , Jalna , Parbhani , Nanded and other big cities like Solapur etc. has to pass along this route and that too through the busy city traffic. This portion of the road through Aurangabad city is all the more vulnerable to road accidents.

According to one estimate , built upon  the basis of  traffic data kept at octroi naka , no.of vehicles bringing in hazardous  raw material to the industrial areas in Aurangabad is 850 to 1000 during a month. Similarly, no. of vehicles carrying hazardous finished goods out of the city to other cities for marketing is 400 to 500 every month.

Besides , there is heavy traffic of vehicles carrying hazardous material to other destination beyond Aurangabad city. According to relevant data  collected about 2100 to 2400 vehicles pass through the city’s roads carrying hazardous materials.

From the above fact it can be seen that the degree of vulnerability of road accident in the district is quite high.

Aurangabad  is an old city having historical background  and fame at national or even at international level. Only recently has it also acquired importance from industrial point of view. The roads within the city are narrow  & full of hurdles. The no. of  road accidents within the city & outside is increasing day by day. This fact is established from the statistics collected on road accidents. In 1985 total no. of road accidents was 383  but in 1993 it  jumped up to 1947 of which the fatal ones were 316. In the city, majority of the accidents took place on the Jalna road  near the complex of St.Francis School & Lokmat’s office .

Hence Road Accidents have been given 2nd place ranking in terms of the historical record of such accidents.

 Epidemic

The climate of the district is excellent. Health facilities in urban areas so also in most of the rural growth centers have improved a lot during the past decade. In rural areas due to upgradation of PHCs to Rural Hospitals , added facilities are now available. There has been a gradual improvement in the drinking water supply position in the rural area. But still the overall position is not satisfactory. Specially in summer , when majority of wells go dry , the potable water  becomes scarce. It is here that the epidemic springs up.

Three is no record in the near past to show that the district is prone to a particular epidemic. But as per the statistical data collected  from the health authorities in the district , there are patches  in urban area as well as in rural areas where various disease are reported very often.

In Aurangabad district 189 villages are highly epidemic-prone . Taluka wise breakup is as under :

            Aurangabad                             29        Villages

            Paithan                                    39        Villages

            Gangapur                                28        Villages

            Vaijapur                                   15        Villages

            Khuldabad                               11        Villages

            Kannad                                    26        Villages

            Sillod                                       29        Villages

            Soegaon                                  12        Villages

The list of  villages with the name of PHC. under whose jurisdiction these villages fall are given separately in Annexure.

The total population of these villages is about  1.63 lakhs. The past history indicates that cholera, infective hepatitis  are the diseases reported from this area.

In Aurangabad city there are a number of houses in slum localities where the sanitary conditions are not good. There has  not been  sufficient piped water supply to such areas. Here the population is economically very poor and can be said to be  living below poverty line and as such this part of the city is highly prone to epidemics.

The vulnerability if further compounded by the high density of population of the city. Hence the risk cannot be ignored & has to be given place in the disaster management action plan.

The district administration has therefore given  second place in the ranking of the disaster covered under the management plan.

Industrial and Chemical Accidents

The speedy progress of industrialisation in Aurangabad , no doubt transformed the districts economy & life,  but side by side , this most important sector of the economy has also raised the danger of industrial and chemical disaster with a potential to cause extreme damage to life & property of the citizen.

Industrial accidents , particularly chemical explosions are characterised by special features that necessitate institution of management technique different from those traditionally used for dealing with the consequences of natural disasters.

Special knowledge is required for prevention of chemical accidents whenever they occur , to respond effectively to the emergency thus created. In the following paragraph an assessment of  the situation obtaining in Aurangabad district is given.

Aurangabad district , as a whole is primarily agriculture district as is the case with the other districts in the Marathwada region, but has now acquired a prime place due to the industrial progress it made during last two decades.

There are 11 industrial estates in the district. There are about 2,500 factories with an estimated 14,000 to 15,000 workers in them.

In Aurangabad city & around it, there are 3 big industrial complexes where 13 hazardous factories are located. The expansion of industries around the city is found in the following directions.

1. Chikalthana complex & beyond on Jalna road ( new site near Shendra village is

    already  selected)

2. Chikalthana complex on Beed road.

3. Waluj complex & beyond on Bombay road ( Additional ,waluj industrial complex

    already started ).

4. Beyond Railway station on Paithan road. 

There are in all 6 existing sugar factories in the district. They are located in Aurangabad taluka (1), Paithan taluka (1) , Kannad taluka (1) , Sillod taluka (1) , & Gangapur taluka (1 ) & Vaijapur ( 1).

Besides these the sugar factories which are coming up soon are as under :-

1.Grishneshwar Cooperative sugar Factory, Tq. Khuldabad.                                               

2.Hiraji Cooperative sugar Factory, Tq. Kannad.

There are 18 Petrol / Diesel pumps in the district.

The no. of gas agencies operating in the district is 12. They have their godowns at different  places.

The names of the 13 hazardous industries in the district are given in Annexure. The details , nature of hazardous raw material used & stored by them , finished goods produced & stored , risk factor involved together with the details of the availability of equipment & manpower to operate the security plan are shown in the fact sheet prepared for each such hazardous factory.

In the above mentioned factories the important raw material which is highly inflammable & explosive in nature includes liquefied petroleum , gas , petrol , HSD , LDO . FO , Methane gas , Methanol , Dimethyle Terephthalate , furnace oil , Glycol (MEG), Santstheren 66 , Ammonia ( in liquid form ) , Chlorine.

The above mentioned materials may be very dangerous in case there is a fire or explosion in the storage or during processing stage causing severe damage to property of not only of the factory  but of the adjoining area within a radius of 2 to 5 kms depending upon the intensity of the explosion. Not only  this , it may take quit high toll of human lives too.

Each factory claims to be fully prepared to face any emergency situation arising out of the likely disaster event. But still the exact intensity & severity of the disaster can not be predicted  & therefore district administration has to remain alert for extending required help , when it is beyond control of the factory administration.

During the period of last 2 to 3 years there have been many small accidents in the area. But the one that happened in Garware Polyester factory at  Chikalthana on 9th Oct.1995 was a major one which took 12 human lives & left 32 persons severely injured . The firebrigade of the factory was found helpless and inadequate to face the disaster & was helped by the Aurangabad Municipal Corporation's Fire brigade service.

Very recently in Waluj Industrial Complex there was another major accident in  factory in Nov.97 which took 2 human lives & rendered 13 persons seriously injured.

From the above mentioned details an idea can be formed about the vulnerability of accidents / explosions in the industrial field in Aurangabad district.

Industrial expansion is also taking place slowly but surely in many talukas of the district. But in absence of a Firebrigade service at the taluka places (except Paithan)  the risk of industrial hazards is high.

The district administration has therefore rightly placed the ranking as one to this disaster in the district.

Fire

 

The fire whatever be the reason, attributable to it , is such a disaster that as in case of earthquake it cannot also be predictable but unlike the later ,can be prevented by adopting safety measures  & also is controllable provided timely help reaches the site with fully equipped team & improved equipment’s & machinery.

Aurangabad  district  is the divisional Headquarters of Aurangabad Division . The population is over 22 lakhs. The city of Aurangabad is growing at a very fast pace; rapid industrialisation has made this place more vulnerable to accidents & fires.

As per the details given above relating to vulnerability to industrial & chemical accidents it is quite evident that whether it is an explosion in any industrial area or the electrical short  circuit in a building , situation is vulnerable to fire. Even if there is no fire after any explosion even then the service of firebrigade is essential.

The taluka places in the district are now also becoming industrial centers slowly.  A large no. of small units have already been set up in big talukas such as Paithan & Vaijapur.

Likewise , at the big rural growth centers , marketing activities have increased considerably , for example there are many centers where purchase of cotton are made from the farmers under the “ monopoly procurement scheme”. This cotton is kept open by the Federation for a considerable period. This cotton is kept in raw form even without processing & hence is more vulnerable to fire. There is no record of incidents of fire at such centers & due to lack of facilities of firebrigade services at these centers or at most of the taluka places , lakhs  of tons cotton are thus destroyed by fires every year. ( The list of such centers is given in Annexure )

If one is not to consider the firebrigade services available in Aurangabad city then there are no such services in other taluka Headquarters ( except Paithan ).

Thus the fire episode gets the fifth  place in the ranking of the disaster.

Cyclones

 

The cyclones , as a disaster is primarily relevant to the coastal districts of Maharashtra such as Ratnagiri , Raigad , Sindhudurg , Thane & area of Greater Bombay.

The location of Aurangabad district is such that it falls closer to Thana , a coastal district in Maharashtra on west coast. On the other side , the district is approximately on the same distance away from coastal districts of Andhra Pradesh on east coast.

Whenever there is warning of predictable cyclones in the west coast & east coast areas people in Aurangabad do not take any particular cognizance of such warnings obviously because of distance factor . But whenever , there happens to be sudden changes in the weather after occurrence of such notified cyclones in the coastal districts its effects are felt by the residents in the districts of Marathwada which are close to Andhra Pradesh border and also in Aurangabad.

Depending upon the severity of cyclones the effects are observed accordingly .This includes high speed winds followed by torrential rains which in turn bring floods. Hailstorms badly damages crops & cattle, besides human losses. It is the experience that such danger is most frequent from the cyclones in Andhra Pradesh than from those affecting Thane district & surrounding areas on west coast.

Earthquake

An earthquake is a natural phenomenon. No body can predict it or prevent it. Advance warning is also not possible at least at present. Then the only alteration open to mankind is disaster planning ,to migrate its effects such as lose of life & damage to property , by timely rescue , relief & rehabilitation operations.

The most important aspect of the disaster management is the preparation of the emergency plan. It has been observed that now a days any administrator would prefer shifting the importance of recovery & relief operations to disaster mitigation & preparedness to improve disaster management capabilities & disaster mitigation practices.

In case of earthquake , as is known that , preventive measures cannot be taken at all. Then what is left to the administration is to prepare a comprehensive emergency response plan , capable to handle the situation effectively in the matter of rescue , relief and restoration of normalcy as quick as possible.

On the basis of Seismic zoning map of India & past earthquake data , an area  of the district can be broadly divided in to the following three categories. area having high seismicity, area having moderate seismicity area having low seismicity.

So far the past record of the district , the district may fall at the most in the 3rd category. There has not been any record of earthquake in the past to show that it affected any part of the district either in terms of human losses or property.

Whenever there were major earthquakes in the country , particularly in Maharashtra , the people felt its tremors in Aurangabad too. But due to distance factor from the epicenter of the quake , the intensity was almost negligible in Aurangabad . But however in 1993 when there was earthquake in Latur & Osmanabad districts , the tremors could be felt in Aurangabad district , alongwith other 11 districts in Maharashtra . There were no reported damages to homes & other property in the district.

On the basis of occurrence of the earthquake in the world and so also in India , it is observed that the earthquake may occur in & around the areas where large /medium irrigation dams are constructed.

In Aurangabad , a no. of such dams are constructed. Among those  the major dam of Jayakwadi is the one which is in Paithan taluka , about 50 kms away from Aurangabad . Area around this dam is under surveillance for the possible occurrence of the earthquake in the area around this dam. The Government has already established a seismological unit at the site which is maintained by the Irrigation Department since 1994.

Now considering the fact that a major earthquake occurred in 1993 in Latur & Osmanabad districts of Marathwada division , the epicenter being at Killari (Latur district), the Aurangabad district being very close to this place , possible occurrence of earthquake in future around the area can not be ruled out & hence the necessity to prepare emergency plan for the district.

CAPABILITY ANALYSIS

 Inventory and Evaluation of Resources

·         In order to assess the capability of the district to respond effectively to different types of disasters inventory & evolution of resources available are necessary. It is all the more essential in respect of disaster to which the district is specifically vulnerable.

·         Primarily, the district is judged in terms of the ability of the district administration to handle any situation, including natural disasters, arising due to occurrence of any such event in the district with swiftness & efficiency by using the available resources, or if need demands, by mobilizing the resources from adjourning districts too.

·         The occurrence of disaster in the first place creates emergency situation & naturally it had to be faced with boldness & executing the relief work with planning. The district administration had to seek public participation in such circumstances.

·         The success of the handling of such situation largely depends on the availability of manpower & financial resources available. But this is not all that which seems essential , what is important is the fact that there should be a tested action plan ready at hand with the administration. So also the coordination between Government & various voluntary agencies ready to keep.

·         Aurangabad is also the divisional Headquarters of Aurangabad Division & also the city has a Municipal corporation. Therefore  there is ample Government manpower available. Likewise there are a No. Of NGOs ready to extend volnury help , if need arises.

 Communication and Media

 Monitoring , Prediction And Warning Systems

The existing technology support available at the district level for monitoring , prediction & warning system for specific disaster are given on the following page.

 Mass Media

·         The effective channels available to the Government machinery to maintain contact with the public include  newspapers , All India Radio , & Doordarshan . During emergency their role gets even more significant Hence it becomes important on the part of the administration at the district level to maintain constant contacts with the media. Alert messages & warning to the community is a integral part of the action plan.

·         From the details of the mass media available in Aurangabad district given below , it can be seen that it covered full range of various channels of media which during the emergency , can be made use of by the authorities effectively.

·         Firstly there are two high power T.V. Transmission centers , one at Aurangabad and the second at Mahismal , near Khuldabad. Secondly there is on AIR station at Aurangabad operating on MW.

·         Besides in all  20 local newspapers which are published in the district . They represents all the principal languages viz. English , Marathi , Hindi , Urdu etc.

·         There are  well spread wireless networks  owned by police , irrigation department , and MSEB. these together have 32 wireless stations & vehicle under them.  Now very recently with electronic media developing fast we have well spread network  of cable TV operators which have covered a large population in the city & towns. According to one estimate , there may be 2 to 3 big centers in the city & anther 114 cable operators having roughly 9 - 10 thousand customers benifieng from this media. So also there is district information officer , who coordinates for publicity matters relating to Government schemes and policies.

 Administrative Preparedness

 Control Room 

Two regular control rooms one for Aurangabad city by commissioner of police and the second for rest of Aurangabad district by SP. (Rural )work throughout the year. These centers have been connected with all the police stations under their respective jurisdiction , which generally starts functioning during mansoon period during this period control rooms are also setup at the Tahsil Headquarters under each Tehsildar ,  likewise , irrigation department  & MSEB. Have regular wireless operating system and  their control rooms.

 Existing Emergency Action Plans

No consolidated multi - hazardous plan is prepared in the district so far . However , police and irrigation department regularly prepare such plan and keep it updated. An action plan for the use in industrial areas of the districts was prepared in 1993 by the industries department . But it is not updated so far . The Deputy Director , Industrial Safety & Health , Aurangabad is the member secretary.

Very recently , an emergency plan was prepared by the district disaster management committee setup in the district under the chairmanship of the collector has prepared a brief emergency action plan. Incorporating the review guidelines & responsibilities of various groups of officers to take-up the relief work on occurrence of any disaster in the district .

 Community Education And Preparedness Programme

In case of disaster like floods epidemics and earthquakes , people are generally kept informed about the ways to face the disaster , and possible threats due to occurrence of such disasters  and also the  how to handle the situation boldly . DAVANDI ( beat of drum ) , hand-bill , and posters are being used to educate the people.

 Land - Use Regulations And Zoning

Land - use regulations and zoning are in vogue in the district as per regional town planning act 1966. Flood line is demarcated alongwith bank of river and the industrial area is also demarcated , in which the construction of houses is prohibited , in urban areas under the A.M.C. & other towns.

Disaster Specific Capability Analysis

FLOODS

·         Flood control plan has been prepared  and it is updated every year before monsoon. Villages in flood - line have been identified and some villages in flood area have been shifted to safe zone.

·         There are 16 flood monitoring stations on Godawari river and these are well linked with communication. There is jayakwadi dam on Godawari  river near Paithan . The Executive engineer , Jayakwadi dam , maintenance Division regularly communicates in rainy season to the collector the water level of the dam and discharge rate of water every day, for precaution and further necessary action. Accordingly the collector office , instructs the Tehsildars to be careful and alert to face the situation , on phone / Fax .

·         All necessary actions are being taken by the Tahsildars. In short the flood situation is being monitored by the S.E I.P.I. Aurangabad & the collector Aurangabad satisfactorily.

 

EARTHQUAKE

·         No major earthquake took place in the district  in the past. But the district felt high jerks in 1967 when there was earthquake in Sangli district & recently in 1993 in Latur district .

·         Seismic observatory is set up at Jayakwadi dam  in Paithan Tahsil of the district . There are no such observatories  at other places in the district . There is control room in collectorate , Aurangabad and it is working for 24 hours during rainy seasons only.  All the concerned departments , especially Police , Public Health , Civil Supplies ,  Social organisations have been instructed to be in readiness for emergency operations. In short entire district machinery is alert to face the disaster.

EPIDEMICS

·         The district  administration is fully prepared to face any type of epidemic in Aurangabad city with the help of civil surgeon & the  A.M.C. Aurangabad  ,in the rural area with the involvement of Gram Panchayat , Pachayat samitees , health department  of Zilla Parishad Civil surgeon and revenue department  out break of epidemic is kept under control . Any out break is  immediately communicated to the DHO ,ZP ,Aurangabad  ( who is district epidemic officer ) by P.H.C. or Panchayat samitee on phone  and immediately concerned machinery acts on war - footing .

·         There are 44 PHCs , 22 Rural Hospitals , one Government  medical college Hospital at district  Headquarters having 1090 beds , one blood bank 16 X- Rays machines , 8 Ambulance one water quality testing laboratory in Government - controlled sector . Besides  there is M.G.M . medical college Hospital . Aurangabad city is well known for availability of best medical facilities . A number of well equipped private medical institutions are located in and around the city . There are 23 private hospitals, 7 blood banks , 6 trauma care units , 32 X- ray machines , 30 ambulances and 8 pathological laboratories in private sector.

·         Thus there are adequate medical facilities to face any outbreak of epidemic or any emergency situation arising out of likely disaster .

ROAD ACCIDENTS 

·         Road accidents have the highest probability among disasters in Aurangabad district , as the traffic is very heavy on Bombay - Aurangabad & Pune - Aurangabad state highways . Besides main reasons of road accidents are negligent driving by the drivers , narrow road with  deep Ghats particularly  , bridges are very narrow at  number of places. There are road  signs , traffic signals , boards showing accident prone areas , on road to alert the drivers . There is also one flying squad with one inspector of motor vehicles , one Jeep and wireless equipment to attend to the accidents . The R.T.O., Police (Traffic) and P.W.Department are promptly dealing with accident episodes.

FIRE

·         There is fourth ranking of probability of fire in the district . Generally fire causes are reported from the city in summer & some times from the industrial area .  In rural area , it is generally reported from the cotton procurement centers . Beside Aurangabad city only Paithan municipal council is showing fire service. In other towns no fire brigade service is available.

INDUSTRIAL & CHEMICAL  ACCIDENTS :

·         There are three major MIDCs at Chikalthana ,Aurangabad , & Waluj. Besides there are 11 industrial estates. There are 2387 industries in these industrial estates . of which only 16 are major hazardous and polluting industries. All these factories are having their own plans for accident control. Among the major hazardous units ,there is one Garware plastic & polyester chips plant at Waluj and two storage and distribution petrol depots of Indian oil corporation and Hindustan petroleum ltd. At Aurangabad . The biggest unit is that of Bajaj Auto at Waluj. These industries have prepared their own disaster management plans and trained their personnel fully to face any emergency.

·         There are 6 sugar factories in cooperative sector which manufacture sugar and alcohol . The workers are trained to face the accidents.

CYCLONES

·         Aurangabad district being away from coastal area there is no cyclones so far in the district.

 Preparedness Measures undertaken by Departments

In addition to the administrative preparedness measures, the district control room will receive reports on preparedness from the relevant  district level departments  and other departments,  as per the details given below. This will enable the District Collector to analyse the capabilities and preparedness measures of various departments and report on the same to the Emergency Operations Centre, Relief Commissioner and Divisional Commissioner.

Preparedness Checklist for Police (to be filled in by the Department Head and submitted to the District Collector every six months)

Preparedness measures taken

Details/Remarks

The  department is familiar with  disaster response plan and disaster response procedures are clearly defined

Orientation and training for disaster response plan and procedures  undertaken

Special skills required during emergency operations imparted to the officials and the staff.

Reviewed  and updated

·         Precautionary measures and procedures

·         the precautions to be taken to protect equipment 

·         the post-disaster  procedures to be followed.

Adequate warning mechanisms established for evacuation

A officer has been designated as Nodal Officer for Disaster Management

Sources of materials required for response operations have been identified

Reported  By :

Designation

Signature

Date


 Preparedness Checklist for Public Health Department (to be filled in by the Civil Surgeon and District Health Officer and submitted to the DCR every six months)

Preparedness Measures taken

Details/ Remarks

The  department is familiar with  disaster response plan and disaster response procedures are clearly defined

A hospital plan for the facilities, equipment and staff of that particular hospital based on “The Guide to Health Management in Disasters” has been developed.

Orientation and training for disaster response plan and procedures undertaken

Special skills required during disaster situations  are imparted to the officials and the staff.

Hospital staff are aware of which hospital rooms/ buildings are damage-proof.

Reviewed  and updated

·         precautionary measures and procedures

·         the precautions that have  to be taken to protect equipment

·         the post-disaster  procedures to be followed.

All hospitals’ staff have been informed about the possible disasters in the district, likely damages and effects,        and information about ways to protect life, equipment and property.

An area of the hospital identified for receiving large numbers of casualties.

Emergency admission procedures with adequate record keeping developed.

Field staff oriented about 

·         DDMAP

·         standards of services,

·         procedures for   tagging.

A officer has been designated as Nodal Officer for Disaster Management

Sources of materials required for response operations have been identified

Reported  By :

Designation                             Signature                                 Date

 Preparedness Checklist   for MSEB (to be filled in by the Department Head and submitted to the District Collector every six months)

Preparedness measures taken

Details/Remarks

The  department is familiar with disaster response plan and  disaster response procedures are clearly defined 

Orientation and training for disaster response plan and procedures  undertaken

Special skills required during emergency operations imparted to the officials and the staff.

Reviewed  and updated

·         Precautionary measures and procedures

·         the precautions to be taken to protect equipment 

·         the post-disaster  procedures to be followed.

A officer has been designated as Nodal Officer for Disaster Management

Sources of materials required for response operations have been identified

Reported  By :

Designation

Signature

Date

 Preparedness Checklist   for Maharashtra Jeevan Pradikaran (to be filled in by the Department Head and submitted to the District Collector every six months)

Preparedness Measures Taken

Details/Remarks

The  department is familiar with  disaster response plan and disaster response procedures are clearly defined

Orientation and training for disaster response plan and procedures undertaken

Special skills required during emergency operations imparted to the officials and the staff.

Reviewed  and updated

·         Precautionary measures and procedures

·         the precautions to be taken to protect equipment 

·         the post-disaster  procedures to be followed.

Adequate warning mechanisms for informing   people to store an emergency supply of drinking water have been developed.

Procedures established for the emergency distribution of water if existing supply is disrupted.

A officer has been designated as Nodal Officer for Disaster Management

Sources of materials required for response operations have been identified

Reported  By :

Designation

Signature

Date

 Preparedness Checklist  for Irrigation Department (to be filled in by the Department Head and submitted to the District Collector every six months)

Preparedness measures taken

Details/Remarks

The  department is familiar with  disaster response plan and disaster response procedures are clearly defined

Orientation and training for disaster response plan and procedures undertaken

Special skills required during emergency operations imparted to the officials and the staff.

Reviewed  and updated

·         Precautionary measures and procedures

·         the precautions to be taken to protect equipment 

·         the post-disaster  procedures to be followed.

Flood monitoring mechanisms can be activated in all flood prone areas from 1st  of June.

All staff are well aware of precautions to be taken to protect their lives and personal property.

Each technical assistant has  instructions and knows operating procedures for disaster conditions.

Methods of monitoring and impounding the levels in the tanks evolved. 

Methods of alerting officers on other dam sites  and the district control room, established

Mechanisms evolved for

·         forewarning  settlements in the downstream

·         evacuation

·         coordination with other dam authorities

A officer has been designated as Nodal Officer for Disaster Management

Sources of materials required for response operations have been identified

Reported  By :

Designation

Signature

Date

 Preparedness Checklist for Telecommunications (to be filled in by the Department Head and submitted to the District Collector every six months)

Preparedness measures taken

Details/Remarks

The  department is familiar with disaster response plan and  disaster response procedures are clearly defined 

Orientation and training for disaster response plan and procedures  undertaken

Special skills required during emergency operations imparted to the officials and the staff.

Reviewed  and updated

·         Precautionary measures and procedures

·         the precautions to be taken to protect equipment 

·         the post-disaster  procedures to be followed.

A officer has been designated as Nodal Officer for Disaster Management

Sources of materials required for response operations have been identified

Reported  By :

Designation

Signature

Date

Preparedness Checklist  for PWD (to be filled in by the Department Head and submitted to the District Collector every six months)

Preparedness Measures taken

Details/Remarks

The  department is familiar with  disaster response plan and disaster response procedures are clearly defined

Orientation and training for disaster response plan and procedures  undertaken

Special skills required during emergency operations imparted to the officials and the staff.

Reviewed  and updated

·         Precautionary measures and procedures

·         the precautions to be taken to protect equipment 

·         the post-disaster  procedures to be followed.

All officers are familiar with pre-disaster  precautions and post-disaster procedures for road clearing and for defining safe evacuation routes where necessary.

A officer has been designated as Nodal Officer for Disaster Management

Sources of materials required for response operations have been identified

Reported  By :

Designation

Signature

Date

 Preparedness Checklist for Agriculture Department (to be filled in by the Department Head and submitted to the District Collector every six months)

Preparedness Measures taken

Details/Remarks

The  department is familiar with  disaster response plan and disaster response procedures are clearly defined

Orientation and training for disaster response plan and procedures  undertaken

Special skills required during emergency operations imparted to the officials and the staff.

Reviewed  and updated

·         Precautionary measures and procedures

·         the precautions to be taken to protect equipment 

·         the post-disaster  procedures to be followed.

Information provided to all concerned  about the disasters, likely damages to crops and plantations,   and information about ways to protect the same.

The  NGOs and other relief organisations are informed about  the resources of the department

A officer has been designated as Nodal Officer for Disaster Management

Sources of materials required for response operations have been identified

Reported  By :

Designation

Signature

Date

 Preparedness Checklist  for Animal Husbandry Department (to be filled in by the Department Head and submitted to the District Collector every six months)

Preparedness measures taken

Details/Remarks

The  department is familiar with  disaster response plan and disaster response procedures are clearly defined

Orientation and training for disaster response plan and procedures undertaken

Special skills required during emergency operations imparted to the officials and the staff.

Reviewed  and updated

·         Precautionary measures and procedures

·         the precautions to be taken to protect equipment 

·         the post-disaster  procedures to be followed.

Hospital staff are aware of which hospital rooms/ buildings are damage-proof.

All veterinary hospitals and centres’ staff have been informed about the possible disasters, likely damages and effects,   and information about ways to protect life, equipment and property.

An  area of the hospital identified for receiving large numbers of livestock.

Emergency admission procedures with adequate record keeping developed .

A officer has been designated as Nodal Officer for Disaster Management

Sources of materials required for response operations have been identified

Reported  By :

Designation

Signature

Date

 Public and Private Sector Resources

 Infrastructure

Infrastructure available in the district as per the data is summarized below :

Man power :

Govt.sector :

a)         Police service personnel                                  :    3912

b)         Fire Brigade personnel                                    :        57

c)         Home Guards personnel                                 :      826

d)         Health Services personnel                               :    1238

f)          Civil Supply & Food     personnel                      :     117

g)         Power Supply personnel                                  :    3215

h)         Water Supply  personnel                                :      503

i)          Engg. Services  personnel                              :    6443

Private Sector

a)         Non - Govt. Organizations personnel              :   N.A.

b)         Private Hospitals personnel                             :      242

c)         Association of trades personnel                       :   13

d)         Religious Sectors personnel                            : 1638

e)         Colleges - I) N.C.C. Cadets

                              ii) N.S.S. Volunteers

Infrastructure

            No.of towns with fire brigade services                        2

            No.of private hospitals with surgical facilities             28

            No.of  public hospitals with surgical facilities             12

            No.of  X - ray machines - Govt.                                  12

            No.of X - ray machines -  private                                20

            No.of beds in Govt. Hospitals                                 2050

            No.of beds in private Hospitals                                 431

            No.of Ambulance Govt.                                               32

            No.of Ambulance private                                             28

            No.of blood banks Govt.                                                5

            No.of blood bank private                                               6

            No.of poison centers - Govt.                                       10

            No.of  pathological Labs. Govt.                                   14

            No.of  pathological ;labs                                                6

            No.of  water - quality testing centers Govt.                   1

            No.of  Trauma care centers - private                           5

            No.of   N.G.Os

            No.of   community based organisations

            No.of    Religious trusts                                                 4

            No.of    Association of traders                                      20

            No.of    colleges                                                            38

            No.of    power stations                                                  28     

            No.of    Telephone exchanges                                       52

            No.of    S.T.Depots                                                         9

            No.of    police stations                                                  23

            No.of    Four wheelers in district                           18,118

            No.of    Two  wheelers in district                           89,896

            No.of    Three wheelers in district                            7285

Technological Support

Technological support available in Aurangabad district is as below :

a) Satellite communication link with state , through National Informatics Center ( district

     computer center ) .

b) Wireless communication is available .

c) Telephones             in all Talukas headquarters.

d)  Fax service at district and taluka headquarters.

 

  Special Equipment At The District Level

Special equipment’s available in Aurangabad district is summarized below :

          Name of equipment                            No.      Department  incharge

a)         Earth moving equipment’s                  6          irrigation Dept.

            (Scrapers)

b)         pockland Machine                               4          PWD & Irrigation Dept.

c)         Bulldozers                                           12        PWD & Irrigation Dept.

d)         Drilling Rigs                                         7          G.S.D.A.

e)         Water Tankers                                                            Engg. Dept. & S.T.

f)          Road Rollers                                       20        PWD & Irrigation Dept

g)         Mobile Crane                                       2          Private

h)         Trucks/Tippers                                7054        Engg. Dept. & S.T.

i)          Tractors                                          1258        S.E sangli circle.

j)          Crushers                                                         P.W.D , Miraj

k)         S.T.Buses                                           511      Rural .urban

                    

  

MITIGATION STRATEGY

Requirement Of The District In Responding To Future Disasters

This section highlights the inadequacies either by way of man - power or infrastructure that the district administration suffers from , and which hamper a proper and co - oriented approach to disaster management action plan.

Warning Systems & Dissemination Methods

The warning system is available in the district . department handling the disaster situation have phone links , with their taluka centers , but facilities of wireless other than the one with police & a few with irrigation department are not now available , which is required . Tehsildars may be provided with wireless sets. Besides computer link through the network of N.I.C. centers should be upto taluka level and all villages should have phone - facility.

Evacuation Assistance Of Individuals , Groups Or Communities

The assistance depends upon the magnitude of the disaster . The police  , Home guards , revenue staff , Panchayat sameeti staff and municipal staff can be deployed for this task for which adequate training is necessary.  Besides  the local people’s participation in evacuation operations may be expected.

Rescue Operations

The rescue operations are carried out during the floods with the help of police , home guards ,revenue staff  and local persons. But at the time of major disaster like earthquake depending upon the severity of its effects in the area there will be necessity to have large No. of trained personnel’s.  The NGOs ,home guards and local persons also need to be trained for rescue operations . There would be new & sufficient No. Of special equipment’s like earth mover , excavators , boats , bull - dozers , water - tankers , ambulances , etc. there should be common kitchen for serving food to the affected persons.

Provision For Disposal Of Dead Bodies , Carcasses And Damaged Food

In case of disasters like earthquake , floods & epidemics , on large scale death toll may run in hundreds / thousands. In such a situation immediate requirement would be of sufficient No.of  stretchers ,for the fast movements of the dead bodies for their disposal. It is also necessary to have sufficient quantity of fire wood , & cloth which can be produced from the adjoining villages/ talukas on charity basis or by local purchases. The forest Dept. Will also be involved in firewood supply . Besides , Diesel / Electrical crematories may be provided at tahsil level and in urban area.

Other Requirements

There should be no problem to make available emergency food and water supply , but their would be shortage of medicines , which may be made available instantly from other centers. Material for erecting temporary bridges would be another requirement. The PWD staff may be trained in this respect. Sufficient No.of tents  and tabular housing structures may be supplied for emergency shelter. Adequate No.of spray pumps , D.D.T.powder , and like materials may be supplied to restore the health & sanitation. Crop insurance scheme may be implemented on large scale.

Requirement of material / equipment for district administration

Sr.No              Item                                         Quantities  required

1.                     Flat bottom boats                                  50

2.                     Fiber mechanical boats                          3

3.                     Life Jackets                                         200

4.                     Masks                                                  100

5.                     Anker with rope                                     25

6.                     Earth moving machinery                         2

7.                     Excavators                                              2

8.                     Bull dozers                                              2

9.                     Cranes                                                                3

10.                   Pockland machines                                4

11.                   Stretchers                                             50

12.                   Tabular housing structures                  500

 Disaster Specific Mitigation Measures

 Earthquake

Those who may unduly scared of an earthquake, should draw comfort from the fact that on a conservative estimate about 100,000 small shocks are felt all over the world in a year and as such it is very difficult to distinguish between fore-shocks and an event in itself.  The risk from earthquake to an individual life is, statistically, far less than the ones we take daily while commuting by train and car or cycling or even walking.  Air travel is also far more risky.

Structural  Measures

1.         All the Kacha & Semi permanent the district be surveyed & these found old & very            weak should be retrofitted or reconstructed as per zone IV norms.

Non  Structural  Measures

2.         In the AMC / M.C. areas, zone IV regulation  should immediately be brought into     force for all new constructions at the time for granting per -mission.

3.         A.M.C., M.Cs. & village Panchayats have to be  suitably empowered to inforce zone          IV regulation.

4.         Gram Panchayat must be given adequate training in this respect.

5.         Voluntary organizations, college students & political works at all levels should be   given short training so as to create awareness about the disaster.

Flood

The seriousness of the flood problem in the district can be judged from the extent of damage it causes.  In addition to the direct damages, there are indirect losses resulting from the disruption of rail, road traffic and dislocation of normal life.

Structural  Measures

1.         There is low flooding frequency in the district.  So also there is no probability of any           major floods in the district.  However, villages in the flood zone have been         identified.  A few of the villages need to be shifted to other safer sites.

2.         In the AMC areas, flooding is reported from the low-laying areas like Hilal Nagar,    Burhani colony due to heavy rains threatening the lives & property of the residents             of these localities.  There is need to survey the sites of these and other such localities          to  find out the causes of flooding such areas.  As a long term measure, protection    walls may be constructed by the AMC at  these places.  It is observed that as a part          of development works undertaken by the AMC in and around such localities  and       coming up of a No. of new colonies many structures have come up.  Likewise underground drainage also changed  the ground  levels at many places considerably.  As a result of this the flow of a rain water is diverted to various routes creating new             flood areas.  Hence there is need to prepare an action plan to include adoption of short term measures to face the situation on occurring the floods.  This may include            leveling some areas to divert the flow of water away from residential sites and keep             ready the evacuation plan to undertake the shifting of families to safer sites before     the onset of mansoon.

Non  Structural  Measures

3.         Local authorities such as AMC/ MCs/Vps should be suitably empowered to deal    effectively with those persons who  construct houses in & around such areas      knowingly that it is in the flood zone & is unsafe for any construction purposes.

4.         There is need to survey such existing localities in order to include it in the   evacuation plan & providing alternate safer site.

Structural  Measures

1.         In the AMC areas areas and in those villages where the drinking water supply source is different than the piped water supply, than the plan may be prepared to cover such areas by the regular piped water supply scheme in phased programme.

2          In all M.C. areas & even rural areas where piped water supply is in vague for quite a          long period, there is need to install the water filtration plants.

3.         The present source of water supply of such areas should be protected from          contamination.

Non Structural  Measures

4.         Bleaching powder should be adequately made available for such areas by the AMC.,         MC & the ZP as the case may be.

5.         Till such supply of drinking water is restored, people residing in this area should be given knowledge as to how the water can be made potable.  For this purpose health works should be assigned specific areas & their visits to such area should be fixed & made compulsory.

6.         Strict measures should be adopted to force the M.C. authorities & the Gram          Panchayat administration to start water quality monitoring system regularly & effectively.

7.         The rural hospitals should be upgraded as to start blood bank & surgical facilities.

 Industrial Hazards

Non Structural  Measures

The action plan to force the hazards from the industrial locations in Aurangabad district is being prepared by the Directorate of Industrial safety & Health for off-site emergencies since last  few years and a separate body  is formed which take care for implementation of response plan. In order to strengthen the working of the of the said plan,some essential l measure are proposed here.

1.         The emergency plan with individual units is not sufficient when the disaster occurred is on large scale and as such Mutual Aid Response Groups approach should be followed and put to practical use during emergency situations.

2.           An Emergency Response Center (ERC) should be established on the lines of Thane - Belapur industrial belt which is owned by Government & operated by Thane - Belapur Association.  In Aurangabad district, Bajaj & Garware can take lead & approach the Government for his facility.

3.         There is need to derive an easily implementable action plan from updated versions of the reports sofar prepared by the Directorate of Industrial Safety & Health.  It should be so specific as to indicate as to what to do & when.

4.         The G.I.S.(Geographical Information System) can be tried in this field.

5.         The safety equipments and other appliances purchased first at the time of starting the factory for use in emergencies and which remain unused for a longer period should be periodically examined from the points of view their working & utility.  It is often seen that due care is not taken for such items as an act of negligence on the part of security staff as a result of which at the time when they are really require to be pressed to operation there are found not in working order.

Fires

On an average 500 to 800 burn cases requiring hospitalization are brought to Government Medical College Hospital Aurangabad in a years.  Besides about equal number of cases go to other hospitals also.  Although there is a 30-bed ward meant for burn cases in Government Medical College Hospital.  But this ward, in no way can well equipped burns unit.  It is as good as any general ward of the hospital.  Similar is the condition in other hospitals in the city.  It is proposed that as a short term measure the present aforesaid burn ward in the Government Medical Collage Hospital be renovated by constructing modern burn & poison unit & providing all the necessary equipment’s & staff.  Also a separate burn unit of the same standard be started in  CIDCO complex in the building where presenting there is a dispensary of the Aurangabad Municipal Corporations

Structural  Measures

1.         All such towns in the district which do not have fire fighting stations the  concerned           M.C. be assisted by Government to establish such stations.

2.         The Cooperative Department should take necessary steps to provide fire fighting equipments at all the Cotton purchase centers to  reduce the depending on regular fire fighting service whenever available.

3.         The AMC Aurangabad should make provision to acquire fire tenders with  hydraulic system to reach upto 7 - floors.  The Government may give necessary financial assistance as per rule for this purpose.

4.         All fire tenders should be equipped with wireless sets / Mobile phones.

Non Structural  Measures

5.         There is need to strictly adhere to the safety measures in giving new etc. connection by the MSEB.  Also periodical checks & inspection is necessary to find out the condition of wires on the street poles connecting the meters & their maintenance.

6.         The procedural delay for moving the fire tender outside municipal limits must be removed.  It is suggested that the coordination authority for this purpose may be vested with the Assistant Director of Municipal Administrative.

7.         Connecting education programmes for fire safety should be  carried out regularly.

 Road Accidents

If we examine the statistics of road accidents in Aurangabad district we find that there is considerable increase in the No. of road accidents.  From 383 in 1985 it has gone upto 1947 in 1993 an increase of 421% over 8 years period.   Likewise, the increase in 1993 over the last year is 1082 i.e. 65 %.  Tracing the reasons for this increase we find that the increase in the No. of vehicles every year is alarming while on the other hand no particular improvement is found in the road conditions.

The Police services look after the traffic arrangement to prevent the accidents & help restoring smooth flow of traffic in cities & outside.

Under the jurisdiction of A.M.C.Police Commissionerate looks after the Traffic regulation. 

Of the total No. of vehicles on road in the district more than 65 % of the vehicle mores in the

AMC areas.  So also, transit traffic from other areas pass through the city.  Taking into

accounts the present  rate of increase in the population of vehicles, on an hand & the growing

number of cases of road accidents on the other, the  years to come would through challenge to

the authorities for regulation of traffic. The measures necessary to adopt for smooth flow of

vehicular traffic & to minimise the road accidents are given at the end of this chapter. 

In the areas under rural Police administration the Police have identified accident prone roads

 & places under different Police Station areas of the district.  Places listed by the rural Police

force are separately shown.

They have revealed the necessity to implement the following           “short-term measures to prevent/minimise the No.of accidents. They are given in the following paragraphs.

The Police authorities (Rural) also feel that in order to handle the    traffic smoothly & with efficiency particularly on occurrence of the        accidents, the police administration be provided with various equipment’s, vehicles & other important articles/materials the list     of which as produced as under.

1.         Ten-Tone heavy Cranes                     =     5

2.         Walk-Talkies                                       =   20

3.         Wireless Sets                                     =     6

4.         Ambulance vans                                 =     2  

5.         Opening of Police                               =      7

            relief Centres with

            medical facilities

Structural Measures

1.         The Chikalthana by pass, still incomplete, should be got completed as  early as possible.  This will  ease the situation as regards the transit traffic to Mumbai - Pune direction which  bitter to creating problems on entering the quantity & proceeding through the already crowded narrow city roads.

2.         As a long-term measure, at all places where the roads cross railway line, over-head bridges should be constructed.  The one such bridge presently under construction on Aurangabad - Paithan road with help push smooth vehicular traffic on this busy route & save the time of users.

3.         Survey of places of identify the area for putting up of the speed        breakers on the           points of the roads.

4.         Fretting sign boards at suitable places.

5.         At the sites on different roads which have been identified as accident prone spots, the rural police have proposed various short-term/Long-term measures which are necessary to minimise the possibilities of accidents in future & thus restore smoothes traffic.  The details are attached as appendix to this report.

6.         Special efforts need to be made to expedite the cases of acquiring of  land which will        speed up the work of completion of widening of roads as per the approved plan.

7.         Max. no of accidents have occurred on Jalna road.  A study team should be formed to examine the causes of accidents & suggest the remedial measures to improve the smooth flow of the traffic.

8.         In the traffic Cell of the Police Commissionerate, the strength of the staff & officers is inadequate.  It is necessary that this Cell is strengthened by posting following address Officers & Constable staffs.

            1.         ACP (Traffic)                           =          1

            2.         Police  Inspector                     =          1

            3.         Police Sub-Inspector              =          2

            4.         Assistant Sub-Inspector         =          2

            5.         Head Constable                      =          4

            6.         Constables                              =          20

              7.        Search light                             =         10

            8.         Glocine Boards                       =          20

            9.         Emergency lamps                  =          20

            10.       Gypsy vehicles                        =            6

9.         It is the experience that there has been continuos visits of VIPs to the city.  Also, at the time of celebration of all national days like Independence Day, Republic Day so also Maharashtra Day etc. and the Cabinet meeting in the city, traffic arrangement load to be specially undertaken on a larger area and hence the meeting for additional workforce in the said Cell.

10.       The traffic Cell also does not have sufficient means of Communication.  One additional Gypsy, 8 Motor cycles & 20 headquarters of the wireless are necessary which should be provided.

11.       Enforcement of rules for the prevention of child drivers by the          R.T.O. strictly.

12.       All the 4 - wheelers of 1978 make which are being used as public   carriages should         not be allowed to ply on roads by R.T.O.

13.       Likewise, the vehicles used by schools for carrying students in the             city should be examined & the above measure should be made        applicable strictly.      

14.       Three - wheeler carrying children to schools should not be permitted to carry more          than 5 children.

INSTITUTIONAL ARRANGEMENTS AT THE DISTRICT LEVEL

Disaster management would involve many layers of participating organization. The three focal levels would be State, District and  the site of the disaster. The State level agencies would be involved in policy decisions, resource allocation, prioritisation of activities and budget allocation and monitoring through  the Emergency Operations Centre.

The District Disaster Management Committee   (DDMC) is an apex  planning body and  will play a major role in  preparedness and  mitigation.

The district level response will be coordinated under the guidance of District Collector who will act as District Disaster Manager.

Responsibilities of Collector

The Collector shall be responsible for

v      preparation of the DDMAP  with the assistance of the DDMC.

v      setting up District Control Room

v      encouraging  formation of Mutual Aid and Response Groups (MARG)

v      Under the DDMAP, district level  agencies would be responsible for directing field interventions through various agencies right from the stage of warning to relief and rehabilitation.

v      At the disaster site,  specific tasks to manage the disaster will be performed.

v      Collector will be an integral part of the DCR.

v      Collector will be assisted by SOC.

·         SOC will be headed by a Site Manager.

·         Site Manager will coordinate the activities at various camp sites and affected areas.

·         The Site Operations Centre will report to the District Control Room.

v      Collector will coordinate all the field responses. Field Responses include setting up Transit Camps,  Relief Camps and Cattle Camps.

The desk arrangements provides for division of tasks, information gathering and record keeping and accountability of the desk officer to the DDM for specific functions. Each desk should have a Desk Officer assigned. The capacity of various desks to coordinate amongst themselves and with the units to be coordinated will ultimately decide the quality of response. Such a function of coordination would largely depend on the capacity to effectively keep a track on communications received and the decisions taken. Pro forma for “In and Out Messages and Register” are given in  Annexure I.

Figure I

Coordination structure at district level

Disaster  Management Committee

A Disaster Management Committee exists to assist the Collector in

v      reviewing the threat of disasters

v      vulnerability of the district to such disasters

v      evaluating  the preparedness and

v      considering suggestions for improvement of the response document DDMAP.

The Committee meets once a year under the chairmanship of the Collector and consists of the following functionaries

The Collector                                                                           

Chairman

The District Superintendent of Police

Member

The Chief Executive Officer, Zilla Parishad

Member

The Additional Collector

Member

The Resident District  Collector                                                

Member-Secy

The Commissioner of Police (if any)

Member

The Chief Fire Officer

Member

The District Health Officer

Member

The District Agriculture Officer

Member

The District Animal Husbandry Officer

Member

The Civil Surgeon

Member

The Executive Engineer, P. W. Department

Member

The Executive Engineer, Irrigation Department

Member

The Executive Engineer, Minor Irrigation Division

Member

The Executive Engineer, M.S.E.B.

Member

The Executive Engineer, MWSSB

Member

The Deputy Director of Education

Member

The Divisional Manager, Railways

Member

The Regional Transport Officer

Member

The Regional Manager, M.S.R.T.C.

Member

The District Publicity Officer

Member

The District Supply Officer

Member

The Local Station Director, A.I.R.

Member

The Local Station Director, Doordarshan

Member

The District Commandant, Home Guards

Member

The Divisional Forests Officer

Member

Sub-Divisional Officer(s)

Member

The Local Assistant Engineer, P. and T. Department

Member

The  Defence Units.

Member

District Level NGOs representative

Members

MARG representatives

Members


District Control Room

The District Control Room, under the control of the district collector, will be the nerve centre

v      to monitor

v      co-ordinate and

v      implement the actions for disaster management. 

In a disaster situation the District Collector is the central authority  exercising   emergency powers to issue directives to all departments to provide emergency response service.

Normal Time Activity

The normal time activity of the Disaster Manager is to

v      ensure that all warning and communication systems, instruments are in working condition.

v      receive information on  a routine basis from the district departments on the vulnerability of the various talukas and villages to disasters

v      the Disaster Manager will receive reports on preparedness from the relevant  district level departments  and other departments,  as per information details. These will be forwarded to the Emergency Operations Centre, Relief Commissioner and Divisional Commissioner.

v      Upgrade and update DDMAP according to changing scenarios in the district

v      Update data bank and maintain an inventory of resources as per  Table 1.

v      Inform Emergency Operations Centre (EOC) and  YASHADA of any changes including updating of data bank and annexures

v      Monitor preparedness measures, training activities  including simulation exercises undertaken by various departments

v      Ensure proper dissemination of DDMAP at the district level, local level and disaster prone areas

v      Encourage formation of MARG in industrial areas.

v      Organise post-disaster evaluation and update DDMAP accordingly

v      Prepare reports and documents on district level disaster events and submit the same to EOC.  The document should include

Ø           source and cause of the disaster,

Ø           description of the response effort,

Ø           recommendations for preventive and mitigation measures,

Ø           plans for upgrading emergency preparedness and response plans.

Table I

Inventory of resources, materials and equipment accessible to DCR

(to be updated by District Control Room every six months and sent to Emergency Operations Centre)

Material/equipment

Departments/Agencies available with

Normal stock/quantity/amount

AC-sheets

1. Asia Enterprises, Samarth Nagar

Ambulances

Central Govt, State Govt., Z.P. and Municipal Corporation

Asbestos sheets

1. Hyderabad Industries Ltd.

   Kranti Chowk, Aurangabad

2. Kanhaiyya Lal and Brothers

    Jalna Road, Aurangabad

3. Laxmi Hardware, Kranti Chowk,   

    Aurangabad

4. Patel Hardware, Kranti Chowk,  

    Aurangabad

5. Sapna Enterprises, Padampura,

    Aurangabad

Bamboo mats

M.A.Aziz Jadhav Mandi

National Bamboo Mart, Jadhav Mandi

Tayyaba Bamboo Mart, Mondha Road

Prakash Balli Shop, Jadhav Mandi

Kashinath Supekar, Jadhav Mandi

Blankets and durries

1. Sheetal Handloom, Kasari Bazar

2.Sheetal furnishings, Jalna Road

3. Rajdhani Handlooms, Tilakpath.

Blood

1.MGM Hospital

2.Kamal Nayan Bajaj hospital

3. Private Blood Banks

Boats/Rescue Boats

Irrigation Department

Bullies

M.A.Aziz Jadhav Mandi

National Bamboo Mart, Jadhav Mandi

Tayyaba Bamboo Mart, Mondha Road

Prakash Balli Shop, Jadhav Mandi

Kashinath Supekar, Jadhav Mandi

Buses

M.S.R.T.C.

Private Owners

Cattle-feed (Pre-mix)

1.Ahmed Khan

2.Anmol Marketing

3.Krishna Pashu Aahar

4.Mahalaxmi Agency

Construction equipments

1. Agarwal Equipment

2. Pratap technical Services

3.Trikal Building Products

Cooked food

Cooking vessels for use in relief camps

1. Champion Steel Centre, Pandaribaba

2.Anand Steel Centre

3. Alankar Bhandi Bhandar

Cranes

Drivers

Drilling rigs

G.S.D.A., Private

Earth moving equipments

1.Muley Brothers

2.A.K.bulldozers

3. Bharat Bulldozers and Crane services

4.J.K.Buldozers and Crane services

Firewood

Generators

GI-pipes

1. Asia Enterprises, Samarth Nagar

2.Bombay tube Co., Shahganj

3.rahul Sales corporation

3000 m(all sizes)

2000 m

1000 m

GI-sheets

1. Chintamani Steel Centre

2. Lalchand and Company

3. Maharashtra General Stores

4. Mutha B.S.

5. Pramod Traders

2000

2000

1000

1000

1000

Ham sets

Defence Department

7

Helicopter service

Jeeps

Mobile trauma care vans

Mobile X-Ray units

Govt Medical Colleges

2

Public address systems

Private

Govt

780

310

Pumps – diesel

              electric  

              hand pumps

Self breathing apparatus

Sign boards

Sniffer dogs

Tagging slips

Tankers

Telephone instruments

Tents

1. Dhanuka Tent House

2. Dole Mangal Kendra

3. Jadhav Mangal Kendra

4. Mahavir Suppliers

5. Shah Brothers

Taxi gas masks

Ajay Engineers and Equipments

Tractor

1. Bharat Auto Stores

2. Ganesh Tractors

3. Nath Automobiles

4. Umrao tractors

5. Prakash Motors

Government departments



Trucks

VHF sets with batteries

Wireless sets

Police (Urban)

Police (Rural)

MSEB

Irrigation

Private

43

21

103

7

12

Warning or Occurrence of Disaster

On the basis of reports from the possible disaster site, or on warning from agencies competent to issue such a warning, or on the receipt of warning or alert from Emergency Operations Centre, the Collector will exercise the powers and responsibilities of  the District Disaster Manager.

It is assumed that the district administration would be one of the key organisations for issuing warnings and alerts. Additionally, the list of  agencies competent for issuing warning  or alert is given below:

 

Disaster                                                                       Agencies

Earthquakes                                                      IMD, MERI,

Floods                                                               Meteorology Department, Irrigation Department

Cyclones                                                           IMD

Epidemics                                                         Public Health Department

Road Accidents                                                 Police

Industrial and Chemical Accidents                      Industry, MARG, Police,

                                                                         

Fires                                                                 Fire Brigade, Police

The warning or occurrence of disaster will be communicated to

v      Chief Secretary, Relief Commissioner, Emergency Operations Centre,

v      Office of Divisional Commissioner

v      All district level officials, Municipal Councils, MARG

v      The officials of central government located within the district

v      Non-officials namely, Guardian Minister of the district,  Mayor, ZP President, MPs and MLAs from the district or affected area

v      Local units of the Defence Services

On the receipt of warning, all community preparedness measures and counter-disaster measures would come into operation. Further, the occurrence f the disaster would essentially bring into force the following :

v      The District Collector will activate the District Control Room as the District Disaster Manager.

v      The DCR will be expanded to include desk arrangements with responsibilities for specific tasks.

v      All district level staff from various departments will be under the direction and  control of the District Disaster Manager. These would also include the district level staff of

Ø           Zilla Parishad

Ø           Municipal Authorities

Ø           MSEB

Ø           MWSSB

Ø           PWD

Ø           MSRTC

Ø           Irrigation

Ø           District Industries Centre 

Ø           Telecommunications.

v      Leave of all officers and staff working with the above organisations, as requisitioned by the District Disaster Manager,  would automatically  stand cancelled and the organisations would direct their staff to report on duty immediately.

v      The Relief Commissioner is the controlling authority in respect of Grants under “2245-Relief on account of Natural Calamities and also Loans and Advances”. He shall, therefore, ensure that adequate grants are placed at the disposal of the Collector under these budget head and that implementation of relief and rehabilitation measures is not hampered on account of paucity of funds or otherwise.

v      The District Disaster Manager  may   in  case of large-scale disasters  get in  touch with the local Defence units for assistance for rescue, evacuation and emergency relief measures.

v      The District Disaster Manager  will have the authority to requisition  resources, materials and equipments from private sector.

v      The District Disaster Manager  will have  power to direct the industry to activate their on-site or off-site disaster management plan and seek assistance from MARG, if required.

v      The District Disaster Manager will set-up  Site Operations Centre/s in the affected area with desk arrangements

v      The District Disaster Manager  will authorise establishment of transit and/or relief camps, feeding centres and cattle camps.

v      An on-going wireless communication and contact from the DCR  to the Site Operations Centres, Transit Camps, Feeding Centres, Relief Camps and Cattle Camps will be activated.

v      The District Disaster Manager  will send the Preliminary  Information Report and Action Taken Report, as per the available information, to the Chief Secretary/Relief Commissioner/Emergency Operations Centre and the Divisional Commissioner.

v      The District Disaster Manager  will authorise immediate evacuation whenever necessary

v      In the event of possibilities of disasters in adjoining districts, including those beyond the state borders, the District Disaster Manager will issue the alert warning to them.

v      In multi-district disasters, if Additional Relief Commissioner is appointed at the multi-district level,   the District Disaster Manager  will report to  the Additional Relief Commissioner.

In the absence of Collector, Additional Collector or Assistant Collector or Resident Deputy Collector will officiate and exercise all the powers and responsibilities of the District Disaster Manager  listed above.

Desk Arrangements in District Control Room  

District Disaster Manager

v      Establishing Priorities

 

v      Direct and coordinate the services  of

Ø           Defence Services, SRP, CRPF, Home Guards, Coast Guards, CISF

Ø           Fire Brigade, Civil Defence

Ø           DOT, Railways, AAI, Port Trust,  FCI,

Ø           DD,  AIR

Ø           MSEB, MWSSB, MSRTC, PWD

Ø           Meteorological Department, MERI, MPCB,

Ø           State Government Aircrafts and  Helicopters

v      Coordinate with NGOs, and aid agencies

v      Enlist  services of GOI/GOM laboratories and expert institutions  for specialised services

Desk Assignments

Functions

Operations Desk

Resident Dy.Collector

Aurangabad

Phone 334127 (O) 333300 (R)

A.  Response Action for

v      Rescue and evacuation

v      Emergency transport for the seriously injured at the earliest possible time

v      Emergency supplies of water and cooked food

v      Salvage Operations

v      Disposal of dead

v      Transfer of marooned persons to transit camps at the earliest possible time

v      Within shortest possible time  for  marooned persons, water, medicines, first-aid, cooked food

v      Transit camps (in accordance with standards laid down) to be set-up at the earliest

v      Food Distribution Centres (in accordance to the Checklist) to be set-up at the earliest

B. Implement  procurement/purchase/hire/requisition plans    of materials  available at the district level. 

C. Establishing communication links

v      EOC

v      Office of Divisional Commissioner

v      Police, Railways, Fire Brigade, Defence Services, Civil Defence,  FCI, CISF, CPWD, PWD, MSEB, Irrigation, MWSSB, RTO, MPCB, IMD, and Inter-departmental relief activities within the district.

v      Mutual Aid and Response Group

v      NGOs and NGO coordinating committee

v      Private donors

D.  Reporting

v      Dispatch of Preliminary Information Report and Action Taken Report to Emergency Operations Centre and  Divisional Commissioner.

v      Dispatch of all  information and any other as asked for by  Emergency Operations Centre and  Divisional Commissioner.

v      Report to Emergency Operations Centre and  Divisional Commissioner on deployment and reinforcements of staff and resources.

v      Identify specific items for follow-up actions on the directives of the District Disaster Manager

E. Supervision and Monitoring of disaster management and relief activities within the district

F. Market Intervention

v      Promote and encourage revitalisation of local economic activities for speedy recovery

v      Prevent hoarding, price hiking and corruption and unauthorised sale of relief materials

v      Initiate  legal action on those engaged in  hoarding, price hiking, corruption and unauthorised sale of relief materials

G. General

v      Disseminate details about legal and official procedures, eligibility criteria with respect to relief and compensation for loss of life, injuries, livestock, crop, houses,  required to be adopted, as received from EOC

v      Maintenance of records (date of joining, period of service, leave record, overtime, etc) for all the persons deployed for relief work within the district

v      Obtaining orders, instructions, clearances, clarifications from state and divisional headquarters

v      Ensure implementation of orders, instructions,  from EOC and divisional headquarters at the disaster site.

v      Requisition of accommodation, structure, vehicles and equipments for relief duty

v      Issue of passes and identification stickers for vehicles on relief duty

v      Issue of passes and identity cards to relief personnel including the persons from NGOs

v      Sanctioning expenses for reimbursement with the approval of the District Disaster Manager (DDM).

Services Desk

Dy.Collector

Collectorate, Aurangabad

Phone

A. A. Assess

v      Search and rescue requirements as per information

v      Relief requirements as per information

B. Organise and coordinate

v      Relief camps (in accordance with standards laid down) to be set-up

v      Arrangements for dry rations and family kits for cooking

v      Cattle camps

v      Relief supplies to Transit and Relief camps or to  Site Operations Centre.

v      Supplies  of fodder and cattle-feed to cattle camps

v      Supply of seeds, agriculture inputs and services to Site Operations Centre.

v      Welfare Services

v      law and  order  (e.g., prevent looting and theft)

C. Coordinate NGO activities through necessary support to ensure community participation

v      Establishing coordination mechanisms among district level NGOs and other state level NGOs such as Indian Red Cross, Ramkrishna Mission, Bharat Sevashram,  Swami Narayan Trust, Bharatiya Jain Sanghatna,  OXFAM, CARE, CASA, CARITAS

v      identification of NGOs to serve on committees,  task force

v      assign  well-defined  area of operations and report to EOC

v      assigning specific response functions to specialised NGOs and report to EOC

v      reporting upon procurement and disbursement of relief materials received through government and non-government channels

v      Mobilise and coordinate work of volunteers ensuring  community participation

Infrastructure  Desk

Superintending Engineer, PWD, Aurangabad

Phone 331022 (O) 331175 (R)

A. Organise and coordinate clearance of  debris

B. Temporary Repairs to  damaged infrastructure

v      power

v      water

v      transport

v      telecommunication

v      roads

v      bridges

v      canals

v      public buildings

C. Construction of Facilities

v      shelters with sanitation and recreation facilities

v      provision of hand-pumps and borewells

v      temporary structures for storage

v      educational facilities

v      medical facilities

v      postal facility

v      helipads




Health Desk

Civil Surgeon

Aurangabad

Phone 331019 (O) 331216 (R)

A. Organise  and maintain records on

v      treatment of the injured and sick

v      preventive medicine and anti-epidemic actions

v      disposal of dead bodies

v      disposal of carcasses

v      Reports  on  food, water supplies, sanitation and disposal   of waste

B. Assess, supply and supervise

v      Medical relief for the injured

v      Number of ambulances required and hospitals where they could be sent, (public and private);

v      Medical equipment and medicines required

v      special information required regarding treatment as for epidemics etc.

C. Supervision of maintenance of standards

v      Identification of source for supply of drinking water through tankers and other means of transport

v      transit and relief camps for cooking arrangements, sanitation, water supply, disposal of waste, water stagnation and health services.

v      Communities for storage of rations, sanitation, water supply, disposal of waste, water stagnation and health services.

v      standards in cattle camps with arrangements for water, fodder, disposal of solid waste, veterinary services

Logistics Desk

A. General

v      Assessment of  reinforcement needs including manpower and deployment of resources  as per information (formats given)

v      Requirement, availability and location of depots, and transportation of wood to the locations for mass cremation

v      Identification of location where mass cremation/burial can be carried out and Manpower and transport that would be required for this work;

v      Identification of location where carcasses can be disposed of  and Manpower and transport that would be required for this work;

v      Requesting for additional resources from other districts/divisional headquarters/EOC.

v      Arrangements with petrol pumps for supply of fuel for authorised relief vehicles against credit coupons

v      Coordinating and supervising issuing of  Village relief tickets to affected families

v      Ensuring safe storage, and transport of relief Supplies

v      Coordinate supplies distributed directly by NGOs and other organisations including private donors

v      Ensure proper maintenance of vehicles and equipment

B. Coordination of  Transport with

v      railways

v      MSRTC

v      Private transporters

v      Boat Operators

v      State Government Aircrafts

v      State Government Helicopters

C. Organising Transport for

v      Rescue parties

v      Relief Personnel

v      Marooned persons

v      Water, medicines, first aid and  cooked food for marooned persons

v      Volunteers

v      Relief Materials

v      Seriously injured and Sick




Agriculture Desk

Principal Agriculture Officer

Aurangabad

Organise and coordinate

v      Rehabilitation of  agricultural production

v      Ensuring  interim crop production through supply of seeds and other inputs

v      Services of extension staff

Communication and Information Management Desk (Communication Room)

Deputy Director (Information)

Aurangabad

Phone 331085 (O) 334063 (R)

A. Set-up  an information centre in DCR to organise sharing of information with mass media and  community

B. Monitor disaster warnings and weather conditions in coordination with and on the advise of

v      IMD,  Irrigation, MERI, Industries

C.  C. General

v      Send Out-Messages on behalf of DDM

v      Maintaining  In-Message, Out-Message Register

v      Collect information from Site Operations Centre

v      Organise  information for  EOC and information on demand from Divisional Commissioner/EOC.

v      Serve as data bank required for managing operational aspects of disaster situations

D. Keep  readily available all the information contained in DDMAP, including

v      Office and residence telephone numbers, fax numbers, and mobile numbers where applicable of Chief Secretary and other Secretaries including Divisional Commissioner

v      Phone numbers, names, addresses and pager numbers where applicable of the officers and staff of the district and Emergency Operations Centre

v      List of people  on the spot who can organise and co-ordinate the relief activities,

v      Phone numbers, fax numbers, wireless, etc. of the other control rooms;

v      Phone numbers, names, and addresses of the field officers

v      Phone numbers, names, and addresses Non-officials (like MPs, MLAS, and Corporators) in the District

v      Planning Information required including maps incorporated in DDMAP 

v      Disaster Site Map and indications on  extent to which other areas may be affected, etc. 

v      Information regarding alternate routes, water sources, layout of essential services which may be affected, etc.

Resources  Desk

District Treasury  Officer, Collectorate

Aurangabad

Phone 334501

A. Maintenance of

v      Books of account for all cash receipts according to source of funding

v      Books of accounts for all cash disbursements according to source of funding

v      Stock register for all relief materials

v      Issue register for all relief materials

v      Dead stock register for all non-consumables (inventory)

v      Record of all personnel payment on TA&DA, daily wages and other incidentals made to relief personnel.

v      Records of all  expenses incurred on administration and disaster management.

v      Records of all transfer of funds (as advances) to other government departments (suspense account)

v      Records  of all cash vouchers and credit vouchers

v      Records of all gratuitous relief

v      Records of all compensation paid

v      Preparation of records relating to finance and accounts as per the formats for dispatch to Emergency Operations Centre

B. Issuing of receipts for

v      All cash receipts

v      All materials receipt

C. General

v      All payments of  approved expenses, dues, claims, daily wages

v      Reimbursement of expenses approved by administration

v      Issue of cash vouchers and credit vouchers for petrol and diesel



Role of Divisional Commissioner

On the occurrence of disaster, the Divisional Commissioner will

v      Provide for reinforcement of resources from other districts within the division

v      Keep in constant touch with Chief Secretary, Relief Commissioner, Emergency Operations Centre

Site Operations Centre and Relief Camps

Planning Assumptions

v      A small scale disaster can be managed through Collector’s office without comprehensive desk arrangements at the DCR.

v      A Disaster  affecting

·         a number of villages

·         doing considerable damage to housing                      

·         spread geographically over a large area and different locations

Þ     creates problems of management and logistics 

Þ     Decentralisation of relief activities will improve the efficiency of DCR. This will require organisation of desk arrangements at the camp sites.

Þ     Site Operations Centre and location of Relief Camps will ensure effective decentralisations and organisation of relief activities.

Site Operations Centre

Depending on the nature of disaster and the type of damage, it may be necessary to set-up a number of relief camps and/or cattle camps.

·         In such a situation, the DDM may decide to set-up a Site Operations Centre to reduce the pressure on DCR for field coordination.

·         Depending on the disaster locations and the number of camp sites, the DDM may decide to set-up more than one Site Operations Centre.

·         The Site Operation Centre and the camps would be wound up after the relief and rehabilitation work is called off or after the relief camps and cattle camps are dismantled whichever is later.

The activities for the Site Operations Centre are given in Table III.

·         The Site Operations Centre will be managed by Site Manager of the rank of Sub-Divisional Officer/Deputy Collector.

It may be noted that a coordinating structure of this type may have many areas of overlap with the DCR and therefore the activities  need not be duplicated. The basic functions of the Site Operations Centre will be to facilitate communication and coordination between DCR and the camp sites. A skeleton structure as given in Table II should be able to perform these tasks.

Relief Camps

Relief Camps would be set-up preferably on settlement lines and unless the disaster is a localised phenomenon, the DDM may decide to set-up as many camps as the number of villages affected. Also the size of the camp will be one of the considerations particularly in urban areas to decide on the number. The administrative structure for such relief camps  responsible for direct service to “victims” is given in Table III. Each relief camp will be assigned to a Camp Officer, of the rank of Tahsildar. In some of the disasters, it may be necessary to set-up Feeding centres only for the victims.

The DDM may agree  to assign some such relief camps or feeding centres to willing non-governmental organisations (NGOs) with demonstrated capability and required manpower. However, such camps would also come under coordinating mechanisms established through Site Operations Centre/s or DCR

Table II

Site Operations Centre 

(at a convenient location from the disaster  site for coordinating site operations)

Activities

A.  Response Action for

v      Rescue and evacuation

v      Salvage Operations

v      Disposal of dead

v      Transit camps (in accordance with standards laid down)

v      Feeding Centres (in accordance to the Checklist) for  two weeks to be set-up at the earliest

v      Emergency supplies of water and cooked food

B.  B. Communication  with

v      Emergency Operations Centre

v      District control room

v      District administration staff in the area

v      Camp Officer for transit camps, relief camps and cattle camps.

v      NGOs and NGO coordinating committee

     C. Communicate to DCR

v      Search and rescue requirements

v      Resource requirements

v      Cash Compensation

v      Receive, store, secure, transport, relief materials for transit, relief and cattle camps, and affected villages.

v      All information  and subsequent demands to district control room

D. Organise

v      Preventive medicine and anti-epidemic actions

v      Inspection of  food, water supplies, sanitation and disposal of waste

Table III

Relief Camps  (Components)

(at a convenient location from the disaster  site for relief )

Desk Assignments

Functions

Operations  Desk A.  Undertake Response Action for

v      Salvage Operations

v      Feeding Centres  for  two weeks to be set-up at the earliest

B.  B. Coordination with

v      Site Operations Centre

v      District Control Room

v      District administration staff in the area

v      NGOs

v      Private donors

C. Manage

v      Dispatch of all information (as per the formats) and subsequent demands to DCR/Site Operations Centre

v      Organise shifts for staff and Supervision of the same

D. General

v      Maintenance of  records (date of joining, period of service, leave record, overtime, etc) for all the persons deployed for relief work at operations centre

v      Get sanction for expenses for reimbursement from the DDM through Site Operations Centre.

Services Desk

A. A. Assess

v      Resource requirements

B. B. Organise

v      Arrangements for dry rations and family kits for cooking within two weeks of the disaster

v      Relief supplies to families or to  households including water, clothing, and food

C. C. Provide Welfare services

v      Restoration of family (including locating  missing children, relatives, friends) 

v      Assistance in locating missing cattle

v      Assisting students to continue with their studies

v      Services for the orphans

v      Assisting individuals with special needs (pregnant women, infants, handicapped, old, widows etc)

v      Counselling services

v      Promotive services for mental health




Infrastructure  Desk A. Clear debris

B. Mobilise community participation and coordinate building of 

v      shelters for affected people with  sanitation facilities

v      temporary structures for storage

v      Kitchens

v      medical facilities

v      education facility

v      recreational facility

v      postal facility

v      temporary Repairs to  damaged infrastructure

 

Health Desk

A. Organise

v      disposal of dead bodies

v      disposal of carcasses

v      disposal of waste and waste water

v      Treatment of the injured and sick

v      Preventive medicine and anti-epidemic actions

v      Inspection of  food, water supplies, sanitation and disposal of waste

Logistics Desk

v      Issue Village relief tickets to affected families

v      Organise distribution of Relief Supplies

v      Receive, store, secure,  relief materials for relief camps, and affected villages.

v      Coordinate supplies distributed directly by NGOs and other organisations including private donors

v      Ensure proper maintenance of vehicles and equipment

v      Ensure optimum utilisation of resources such as fuel, food, and other relief materials

v      Mobilise and coordinate work of volunteers ensuring  community participation

v      Organise facilities for staff and volunteers




Communication and Information Management Desk

Collect and dispatch following information to Site Operations Centre

v      Data collection

v      Record keeping

v      Assistance in locating missing persons

v      Information Centre

v      Organisation  of information for Site Operations Centre  and on specific demands.

v      Maintaining In-Message and Out-Message Register

v      Sending all Out-Messages on behalf of Camp Officer of Relief Camp.

Resources Desk

A. Maintenance of

v      Books of account for all cash receipts 

v      Books of accounts for all cash disbursements

v      Stock register for all relief materials

v      Issue register for all relief materials

v      Dead stock register for all non-consumables (inventory)

v      Record of all personnel payment for daily wages and other incidentals made to relief personnel.

v      Records of all  expenses incurred on administration and disaster management at relief camp.

v      Records of all gratuitous relief

v      Records of all compensation paid

v      Preparation of records relating to finance and accounts as per the formats for dispatch to Site Operations Centre

B. B. General

v      All cash donations must be deposited with District Control Room and a receipt for the same obtained

v      All material donations must be entered in stock register  and made available for inspection to officer from the District Control Room or Site Operations Centre

v      Maintain record of all issue of cash vouchers and credit vouchers for petrol and diesel



Facilities/Amenities Provided in the DCR


Planning Assumption

v      The Collector’s office has an adjoining Meeting Room, which can accommodate approximately 30-40 people. Hence, this will be used as a Conference  Room.

v      The Communication Room is located next to  the Collector’s office

Layout

The DCR  has

v      adequate space for a large workstation

v      various desk arrangements during  disaster situations. 

The DCR is equipped with

v      necessary furniture and storewells for keeping

Ø           files of messages

Ø           stationery

Ø           other office equipment. 

v      Action Plans including sub-plans and local plans

v      Vulnerability Maps

v      List of key contact persons

[Are easily accessible with clear labels,  and not kept under lock and key]. 

Important phone numbers which are frequently required are displayed on the wall so that they can be seen easily,   while other phone numbers, names and addresses etc., are also  maintained on the computer to facilitate easy retrieval and cross-referencing..

Provision is made for

v      first-aid and other basic medical relief for the staff

v      a rest room with  adequate facilities and

v      a lunch room

[This is required especially during disaster  when staff may have to be on duty for long hours at a stretch].


Communication  Room (Main Message Room)

[The existing police wireless system continues to be in contact with  the reorganised DCR].

In addition, the following facilities are available in the communication  room

v      Telephones

v      Fax

v      Intercom units for contact  within the Collectorate

v      VSAT connection to the Divisional Commissioner and  EOC in Mantralaya 

v      Civil Wireless Network upto Tahsildar level

v      One PC with modem and  printer

v      Mechanical typewriter

v      Mobiles and Pagers (where available and necessary)

v      Photocopying machine

During disaster, hotlines from communication room to be connected to

Ø           Divisional Commissioner

Ø           EOC at Mantralaya

Ø           Superintendent of Police of the district

Ø           Civil Surgeon  of the district

Ø           Site Operations Centre

Separate tables are provided for each communication instruments such as 

v      VSAT

v      telephones

v      fax

v      computer

v      printer

v      typewriter

v      wireless

The phones, i.e. intercom, STD phone, EPBX extension, hotline etc., are of different colours, and with distinct rings if possible, to enable them to be distinguished from each other. An emergency light,  fire extinguishers, and a generator  for the computer and fax machine are also  provided in the communication  room.

Desk Requirements

Each of the desks have

v      an independent phone with STD facility

v      intercom units for contact  within the Collectorate  for all Desk Officers  in DCR and  Officers-in-charge from line departments and other agencies  at the district level

v      hotline for all Officers-in-charge to be connected to their respective agencies/departments.

v      Office space for secretarial facility has to be clearly demarcated.

[These telephones with STD facilities will be installed in DCR and kept in working condition under lock and key during normal circumstances].

Transport

Provision is made for a jeep with wireless communication assigned to DCR during normal times. Additional vehicles will be requisitioned as per the requirements during the emergency.

Staffing requirements for DCR

Three categories of staff are suggested for the DCR: Regular Staff for Communication Room,  Staff -on-call and Staff on Disaster Duty.

Regular Staff

The regular staff will be posted permanently in the DCR which will be responsible for manning the Communication  Room on a 24-hour basis.

The regular staff would include the following:

v      Desk  Officer - Communication  Room  

A  Deputy Collector from the Collectorate   will function as the Desk  Officer - Communication Room.  He will be in charge of the day-to-day operation of the Communication Room during official working hours. He will be assisted by officers of the rank of  Naib Tahsildars and Awal Karkuns  from the Collectorate  in rotation during non-working hours.

v      Communication  Room Assistant

The person holding this position will be the key person of the DCR and will be of the rank of an Awal Karkun. He will always be physically present in the Communication  Room.  He will be responsible for processing all messages and information received and maintained by the Communication Room and communicating the same to the Desk Officer and Collector.

v      Stenographer

The person holding this position will provide all secretarial assistance to the Communication Room. The person should be computer literate and should be able to operate  database systems.

v      Communication  operators (for 24 hours)

The communication operator will attend to wireless set as well as the VSAT connection in the Communication Room.

v      Driver cum Messenger/Attendant (for 24 hours)

Drivers will be required for the vehicle attached to the DCR and kept on stand-by duty. These drivers should also be trained to operate the wireless fitted in the vehicle attached to the DCR.

Staff-on-call

Staff-on-call will be available for immediate duty in case of a disaster.

Two Deputy Collectors will make up the Staff -on-call.  During a disaster, these officers will always be available "on call".

The staff-on-call will be appointed in rotation from some identified departments.  The rotation period could be of at least a month, to ensure some degree of continuity.

Staff on Disaster Duty

Staff on Disaster Duty will be required to shoulder additional responsibility in the case of a disaster. This, additional staff will be in the nature of a reserve   and may be drawn from various departments.  During normalcy, this staff  will not be called on to perform any duty in the DCR. This staff will be responsible for managing the desk arrangements mentioned earlier.

The departmental officers nominated as “Officer-in-Charge” from the concerned line departments and other agencies will be available in the DCR during the disaster period. 

Departments have appointed the   senior-most District Officer of  the department as “Officer-in-Charge”.

The Collector, Additional Collector, Assistant Collector, Resident Deputy Collector,  all  Deputy Collectors, SDOs and Tahsildars  are familiar with the functioning of DCR.

Officers-in-Charge drawn from various line departments and agencies will be provided orientation through training  programmes to be organised by YASHADA.

Multi-district  Disasters

In case of  disasters which have an impact on more than one district in a division the role of the Divisional Commissioner  comes into prominence . The Commissioner’s responsibilities shall include exercising  general supervision over the work of preparation of contingency plan undertaken by the Collectors in his Division and also on the relief and rehabilitation operations in those districts.

At the Divisional Commissioner’s level all the state departments and agencies have a regional head. It is very practical  for the Divisional Commissioner to seek the support of these regional heads towards the commitment of regional resources to a disaster situation.

For a disaster in more than one district (within or across the division), the role of Divisional Commissioner is to:

v      provide a unified command through inter-district control room

v      ensure need-based  resource allocations amongst districts

v      seek the support of regional heads of line departments for relief

v      Direct and Coordinate in response to requirements from district control room the services  of 

Ø           MSRTC

Ø           State Government  departments

Ø           SRP, CRPF, Home Guards, Coast Guards, CPWD, CISF

Ø           Fire Brigade, Civil Defence

Ø           Telecommunications

v      maintain a close liaison with the EOC

v      seek  policy guidelines, if necessary

v      Mobilise  services of Central/State government laboratories and recognised research centres for specialised services

In such a situation, the Divisional Commissioner  will act

v      as  the Additional Relief Commissioner for the disaster area,

v      his powers will be analogous to that of Relief Commissioner in the EOC.

Ø           will access funds from the State Government for this purpose

Ø           will be assisted by Deputy Commissioner, Revenue in  discharge of disaster

           management functions as is the normal practice.

Ø           will receive the support of other Deputy Commissioners and Assistant Commissioners

        and Line Department Heads.

[The district control rooms would continue to function in their respective districts and perform all the functions as per the DDMAP].

RESPONSE STRUCTURE

Planning Assumptions

v      The multi-disaster response plan  takes a generic approach to disaster situations to identify information requirements along with communication, coordination, monitoring and institutional arrangements.

v      The overall response structure remains constant irrespective of the type of disaster.

v      The flow chart  indicate the chain of command that should be set in motion in order to manage the disaster.

Key Officials of various Departments

Deptt.                    Head  of  Deptt.                                            Phone  Nos.

                                                                                           Office              Residence

1)    Revenue        Resident  Dy. Collector                       334127                333300

2 )    Police          Dy. Sptd. of  Police  (Home)                334871                334033

3)     Health          Civil Surgeon                                       331019                331216

4)     Finance        Dist. Treasury Officer                          334501             

5)     Z.P.              Chief Executive Officer                        331291               331292

6)     M.C.            Chief  Officer  M.C. Aurangabad         331194               331309

7)     P.W.D.         Spurintending Engineer  PWD              331022               331175

8)     Irrigation    Ex. Engineer  M.I. State                        334179

                              

9) Animal            Jt. Director                                             331192             486568

    Husbandry

9)      Forest           Conservator of                                       331209              331208

                             Forest,

10)     R.T.O.        Regional Transport                              331133             337300

                              Officer

11)    Industries    Gen. Manager, DIC                      331136             480530

12)    District           Dy. Director, Information                   331085            334063

 Information

13)    M.S.E.B.      S.. Eng. M.S.E.B.(O&M)                   331087             337045             

14) M.J.P.             S.E.                                                     322238             331091

15)  Telephones     General Manager                             350100               350101

                              Telephones                        

________________________________________________________________________________



Involvement and Assistance available to Departments from Private Sector/Academic Institutions

Police Department

The following colleges have NCC and NSS volunteers who can help the police.

Name of College /  Name of prog

Telephone

   strength  of students

 ramme Offcicers

   Boys

  Girls

Total

Government College of Arts

& Science Aurangabad

341476

110

45

155

Shri D.S.Birajdar  Pro.Officer

S.B.E.S College of Arts

332040

and Commerce Aurangabad

220

80

300

 Dr.B.S.Gheware, Pro.Officer

Shri S.B.Kulkarni,Pro.Officcer

 Mrs. A.M.Kathar, Pro.Officer

Milind Arts College Aurangabad

337836

101

24

125

Sri R.A.Jadhav, Pro.Officer

Shri L.B.Waghmare,Pro.Officer

 Deogiri College Aurangabad

381102

175

75

250

Shri Balasaheb Borse,Pro.Offr.

Shri S.S.Jadhav,Pro.Officer.

Dr.Babasaheb Ambedkar

321280

140

20

160

Arts & Commerce College

Aurangabad

Shri R.B.Surwase,Pro.Officer

Shri S.M.Jadhav,Pro.Officer

Govt.Medical College Aurangabad

334411

80

20

100

Dr.Vijay Gaikwad,Pro.Officer

Pratishthan Maha Vidyalaya

23062

130

70

200

Paithan Dist.Aurangabad

Dr.B.P.Ready,Pro.Officer

Shri B.S.Rai,Pro.Officer

Vasantrao Naik College, A'abad

482321

104

50

154

Shri N.S.Ragde, Pro.Officer

Mrs.H.J.Wankhede,Pro.Officer

Vivekanand Arts & Sardar Dilipsingh

337351

222

38

26o

Commerce College, Aurangabad

Dr.R.S.Wanare,Pro.Officer

Shri D.J.Wanmare,Pro.Officer

Name of College /  Name of prog

Telephone

   strength  of students

 ramme Offcicers

   Boys

  Girls

Total

S.B.Science College Aurangabad

332192

125

50

175

Dr.Kanchan Deshmukh,Pro.Officer

Dr.V.N.Pardesi,Pro.Officer

Pandit Jawaharlal College,A'bad

67

33

100

Shri L.U.Meshram,Pro.Officer

I.B.P.Mahila College of Arts

nil

150

150

and Commerce,Aurangabad

Dr.(Mrs.)V.V.Prohit,Pro.Offcier

Mrs.V.P.Bansod,Pro.Officer

Maulana Azad College,Aurangabad

332929

106

19

125

Shri Pathan Ayub Khan

Milind Science College A'bad

334856

50

50

100

Shri R.D.Salve,Pro.Officer

Dr.B.A.M.University(NSS Unit)

50

25

75

Aurangabad

Programme Officer

Mrs.S.S.Awchar,Pro.Officer

Ayurvedic College,Kanchanwadi

59

41

100

Aurangabad

Dr.A.K.Burley,Pro.Officer

Aurangabad College for women

332462

Nil

75

75

Navakhanda,Aurangabad

Shri S.V.Pathan,Pro.Officer

Sir Syed College,Aurangabad

321285

50

25

75

Shri Pathan Vasiullah Khan

Institute of Science,Nipat Ranjan

32

18

50

Road, Aurangabad

Dr.S.K.Markandya,Pro.Officer

Rajiv Gandhi Night College,

93

12

105

N-5, CIDCO,Aurangabad

Shri G.R.Tungaonkar,Pro.Offcier

DKKM Homoeopathy Medical

31

19

50

College Guru Ganesh Nagar,A'bad

Dr.R.B.Thobre,Pro.Officer

Vinayakrao Patil College,

2086

162

88

250

Vaijapur Dist A'bad

Shri N.K.Patil,Pro.Officer

Yashwantrao Chavan College,

67

33

100

Sillod.

Shri N.Y.Kanade,Pro.Officer

Name of College /  Name of prog

Telephone

   strength  of students

 ramme Offcicers

   Boys

  Girls

Total

Shri Shivali College of Arts &

21042

44

6

50

Commerce,Kannad Dist.A'bad

Shri L.S.R.Patel,Pro.Officer

Sant Dnyaneshwar College

85

15

100

Soyegaon,Dist.A'bad

Shri G.S.Sonawane,Pro.Officer

Muktanand College,Gangapur

55

20

75

Shri D.R.Khairnar,Pro.Officer

Chistiya College,Khuldabad

58

17

75

Shri E.N.Shaikh

Arts and Commerce College,

40

10

50

Deogaon(Rangari)Tq.Kannad

Dist.Aurangabad

Shri V.B.Kandare,Pro.Officer




List  of   Fire-wood  stockists  and  Saw  Mills who can provide firewood for disposal of dead bodies and carcasses

 No.

Name

Address

Tel No.

1

Balaji Wooden Industries

Banjara Colony, Khokadpura , Aurangabad

320042

2

Bhagwati Timber Mart

No. 41/8/26 Mondh Road

332485

3

Bhagwati Ply & Timber

4-5-6 Arhat Market  Mondha Road, A'bad

338184

4

Bharat Timber Mart

Opp. Amarpreet Hotel Jalna Road, A'bad

332873

5

Captain Saw Mill

Mondha Road , Jafar Gate A'bad

329583

6

Ganesh Timber Mart

Samshan Maruti Road, Aurangabad

326653

7

ganesh Wooden Industries

Banjara Colony, Khokadpura ,

333687

8

Govind Saw Mill

Mondha Road Aurangabad

 --

9

Harsul Saw Mill

Mondha Road Aurangabad

337770

10

Jawahar Saw Mill

New Baijipura, Aurangabad

331658

11

Jawahar Saw Mill

Kranti Chowk, Aurangabad.

324845

12

Kailash Timber Industries

Samshan Maruti Road, Aurangabad

332719

13

Kabra Saw Mill

Samshan Maruti Road, Aurangabad

321195

14

Laxmi Saw Mill

Kranti Chowk, Aurangabad.

323408

15

Mahadev Saw Mill

Mondh Naka Jalna Road,

329368

16

Maharashtra Saw Mill

Near Tisgaon Pune Road, A'bad

554170

17

New Bharat Saw Mill

Samshan Maruti Road, Aurangabad

 --

18

New Shivb Timber Mart

Samshan Maruti Road, Aurangabad

26653

19

Omya Timbver Mart

Near Abhinay Cinema, Aurangabad

336657

20

Patel Saw Mill

Kranti Chowk, Aurangabad.

333267

21

Patel Saw Mill

Near Airport, Chikalthana, A'bad

482391

22

Patel Industries

Opp. API, CIDCO, Aurangabad

482044

23

Patel Timber Industries

Near Abhinay Cinema, Aurangabad

333391

24

Patel Timber Mart

MIDC, Chikalthana, Aurangabad

482195

25

Patidar Wooden Work

Kranti Chowk, Aurangabad.

333638

26

Shri. Sarswati Timber Mart

Mondha Road Aurangabad

337065

27

Shakti Timber Mart

Samshan Maruti Road, Aurangabad

333481

28

Shri. Shanker Vijay Saw Mill

Kranti Chowk, Aurangabad.

334659

29

Shanti Timber Industries

Samshan Maruti Road, Aurangabad

337055

30

Sharda Timber Mart

Samshan Maruti Road, Aurangabad

336484

31

Shri. Shiv Timber Mart

Mondha Road Aurangabad

336731

32

Shri. Durga Timber & Plywood

N-6, CIDCO, Aurangabad

482195

33

Shri. Ram Timber Mart

Opp. AIR Station, Aurangabad

334199

34

Siraj Saw Mill

Near Kali Baudi, Aurangabad

339157

35

Tayyaba Timber Mart

Near Kali Baudi, Aurangabad

321156

36

Shri Umya Timber Mart

Near Abhinay Cinema, Aurangabad

37

Vishnu Sawmill & Timber Mart

Ajab Nager, Kranti Chowk, A'bad

332797

38

Vijay laxmi Saw Mill

Waluj Road, Aurangabad

554413

39

Surya Saw Mill

Kranti Chowk, Aurangabad.

333011


PWD

The names and addresses of contractors in Aurangabad district. These contractors can help in repairs of roads, bridges and buildings, construction of relief camps, clearance of debris etc.    

List of Civil Work Contractors in Aurangabad District.

Sr.

Name

Address

Telephone

 

No.

 

1

Agrawal Construction Co.

Nirala Appartment Shilpa

331338

 

Nagar St.Road.

 

2

P.M.Choradya

10,Ahsinsa Nagar AIR Road

333717 (O)

 

335752 (R)

 

3

D.V.Engineers & Contractor

68,Pannalal Nagar.

331934

 

4

Deshmukh Villas

Yesh Shri Colony

 --

 

5

Patil U.P.

12,Sahakar Nagar.

3334748

 

6

Maula Alim Khan

Behind Gurudwara.

 --

 

7

Ozha Group of Engineers

Renjaionwar Colony CIDCO.

482978

 

8

Mohite M.N.

Sundernagar Nageshwadi.

338333

 

9

K.K.Construction

8,Apna Bazar Jalna Road.

24056 (O)

 

332545 (R)

 

10

S.P.G.Construction

50,Shrey Nagar.

335547

 

11

Sayojana Construction Co.

N-4,CIDCO.

483021

 


Agricultural Department

The list of wholesalers of seeds, fertilisers and pest control chemicals.

Fertilisers

Sr. No

Name of the Agency

Address

Telephone

 

 

 

1

Adarsh kurshi Seva Kendra

New Mondha

333510

 

2

Ashok Agencies

New Mondha

333168

 

3

Baba Agencies

Nawabpura Mondha

 

Road

 

4

Gukuldas Navander

Shahganj

 

5

Darakh Agencies

New Mondha

324577

 

6

Deepak Fertilisrs & Petro Chemicals.

CIDCO

483233

 

7

Maruti Fertilisers Chemicals Ltd.

Nutan Colony

332111(O)

 

336515 (R)

 

8

Sanjay Fertilisers

Jadhav Mandi

 

9

Maharashtra Coop Protection

New Mondha

337495/

372913

10

Pensh Agro inputs Markeeting

 

Pvt Ltd.

New Mondha

328242

 

11

M.R.Traders

Sindhi Colony

324519

 

12

S.M.Darak & Sons

Sarafa Road.

336789

 

Seeds producers & Distributors

Sr.

Name of the Agency

Address

Telephone

No.

1

Ajeet Seeds Pvt-Ltd.

2nd Floor Tapadiya

323016

Terrace Adalat Road

332572

2

Akash Seeds.

Kailash nagar Dada

Colony

3

Arya Seeds

Tapadiya Terrace Adalat

332066

Road

4

Amar Shaheed Beej

Nawabpura, Mondha Road

333302

Bhandar

5

Nath Seeds Ltd

Nath House

333363

333314

6

Pro-Agro Seeds Co.Ltd.

Plaza Town Centre, CIDCO

483323

484761

7

Krishna Agro Sales &

 Shahganj

329264

Services

328589

8

Vijay Beej Bhandar

New Mondha

333477

9

S.M.Darak & Sons

Sarafa Road

324789

10

Gokal Seeds

Jadhav mandi

333886

11

Meher Seeds Corporation

Nawab Pura

329130

12

Umesh Krushi Seva Centre

New Mondha

332565

13

Sangeeta Agencies

New Mondha

337574

14

Godavari Seeds Pvt Ltd.

New Mondha

320949

Pesticides

1

Ashok Pest Control

Rokadya Hanuman Colony

Services

2

Best Pest Control Services

Radha Appartments Khara

323235

Kunwa

3

Perfect Pest Control

Priya Dashmi Colony N-5

482758

G-33,CIDCO

334723

4

Pest Control (India) Ltd

21, Tilak Nagar

337192

5

Rukmani Pest Control

Shivshankar Colony

 -

6

Scientific Pest Control

Samrath nagar

 -



R.T.O

List of Private Bus Owners

Sr.

Name of Owner or Agency

Address

No.of

Telephone No.

No

buses

1

Punjab Tour's & Travels

Adalat Road

1

21431/26431

2

Shri Nath Tour's & Travels

Kranti Chowk

1

3

Diamond Tour's & Travels

Adalat Road

2

336040/338646

4

Ghatge & Patil Tour's & Travels

16, Shoping Centre Printravel

1

335096

5

Jet Travels

Adalat Road

4

3370806/330366

6

Jet Deluxe

Adalat Road

4

7

Royal Cars

Kranti Chowk

1

302067/335988

8

Seva Tour's & Travels

Samarth Nagar

1

9

Samrat Tour's & Travels

Tapadia Tarrace

6

10

Himalaya Tour's & Travels

Tapadia Tarrace

2

11

Travel Track

Jalna Road

2

12

Vibhuti Tour's & Travels

Adalat Road

4

13

Royal White House

Adalat Road

4

14

Humsafar Travels

Osmanpura

3

335957

15

Sangita Tour's & Travels

Adalat Road

2

16

India Tour's & Travels

Mill Corner

2

333052

17

Sai Sangam Travels

Adalat Road

9

18

Manmandir Travels

Tapaid Terrace Adalt Roat

19

Prasanna Travels

Bus stand Road

4

20

Jugnu Travels

Tapaid Terrace Adalt Roat

4

21

Jaideo Travels

Adalat Road

 -

22

Rajhans Travels

Kranti Chowk

4

23

CityLink Travels

Mill Corner

6

24

Sainee Travels

Adalat Road

6


Health Department

List of    Private Doctors with Speciality .

Sr.

Name & Qualification

Address

Telephone No.

No

Physician and Cardiologists

1

Dr. S.R. Bhatiea M.D.

Jalna Road

336431

334631

2

Dr.R.B.Bhagwat M.D.

Kamal Nain Bajaj Hospital

331448

331609

3

Dr.Bhide Sandhya M.D.

Dashmesh Nagar New

331697

Osmanpura

4

Dr.Anil Boralkar M.D.

Kranti Chowk

23454

20041

5

Dr.Raji Deshpande M.D.

Seva Hospital Sindhi Colony

334309

6

Dr.Santosh Deshpande M.D.

Aniket Hospital CIDCO

330306

7

Dr.S.P.Ekbote M.D.

Kamal Nain Bajaj Hospital

331448

482767

8

Dr.Sawji M.H. M.D.

Kamal Nain Bajaj Hospital

334133

9

Dr.Kikas Ratnal Parkar M.D.

331994

10

Dr.Rajarkar D.V.M.D.

Venkatesh Hospital

337994

11

Dr.Parwaz Qureshi M.D.

Roshangate

12

Dr.Kishor Pargaonkar M.D.

20,Pushpa Nagri

331862

331565

13

Dr.Kudre Murthy Shrikant

Khadkeshwar

332918

14

Dr.Jillan Parsi S. M.D.

Motiwala Nagar

337245

15

Dr.Jaiswal K.B. M.D.

Sawetri Colony Chelipura


Radiologist/Ultrosonologists

Sr.

Name

Address

Tel. No.

 

No.

 

1

Dr.P.A.Badjatya,M.D.

Ellora Diagnostic Centre,A'bad

2

Dr.Sunil Deshpande,M.D.

Kamalnain Bajaj Hospital,A'bad

          331448

3

Dr.V.T.Jadhav,M.D.

Trupati CT Scan,A'bad

320621

4

Dr.Ramesh Malani .,M.D.

Opp.M.S.E.B.Office,A'bad

338794

5

Dr.Lahoti Gokuldas,M.D.

Opp.St.Francis D'Sales H.S.

321149

Jalna Road,A'bad

6

Dr.Rajindra Kshirsagar

Dr.Hegdewar Hospital,A'bad

331994/

331995


Urologists / Nephrologists

1

Dr.Suhas Bavikar,M.D.

Samarth Nagar,A'bad

329019

2

Dr.S.S.Borkar,M.D.

Kamalnayan Bajaj Hosp.A'bad

331448

3

Dr.P.P.Pargaonkar,M.D.

Janki Hospital,Bhagyanagar

332745

4

Dr.P.T.Patel, M.D.


Trust  Hospitals

1

Dr.Hegdewar Hospital

Bhagya Nagar

331994/331995

2

Kamalnayan Bajaj

Adalat Road, A'bad

331448

3

Lion Hospital

N-1,CIDCO,A'bad

482032

4

Mahatma Gandhi

N-6, CIDCO

484406

Memorial Hospital

5

Marathwada Cancer Hospital

Chikakalthana

484192

6

Satya Vishnu Trust Hospital

Opp.Himayat Baugh

336353

7

Sumanjanjali Pratishtn

Khadkeshwar

336900


List of private Hospitals at the Taluka Places in Aurangabad District

Sr.No.

Name of incharge of

Hospital

No.of beds

No.of Doctor

Tq.Paithan

1

Dr.Chakurkar

10

2

2

Dr.Joshi

6

1

3

Dr.Bhosle

10

1

4

Dr.Mandhane

10

1

5

Dr.Sraf

10

1

6

Dr.Lehare

10

1

7

Dr.Londhe

10

1

8

Dr.Devade

10

1

9

Dr.Bobade

10

1

Vaijapur

1

Dr.Pardesi

4

1

2

Dr.Shah

6

1

3

Dr.Joshi

6

1

4

Dr.Bhopale

6

1

5

Dr. Annadate

6

1

Khuldabad

1

Dr.Hashmi

4

1

Kannad

1

Trupathi Hospital

5

1

2

Dr. Jadhav

5

1

3

Dr. Sk. Mukhtar

5

1

Sillod

1

Dr. Mandlecha

6

1

2

Dr. Jaiswal

6

1

3

Dr. Shah

6

1

4

Mumta Hospital

10

1

5

Dr. Karnawat

6

1

6

Dr. Zolwar

10

1

7

Dr. Sonar

6

1


Animal Husbandry

List of Authorised Dealer of Veterinary Medicines in Aurangabad District.

Sr.

Name of Stores

Address

Telephone

1

Astro Enterprises

Near Anjali Cinema

339822

2

Kamghenu Pashu

Kranti Chowk Police

339293(S)

Aushadhalaya

Station Road

334515(R)

3

Nitin Agencies

Bhora Niwas,Khadkeshwar

332612

4

Vishwa Distributors

Shop No.2 Nishant Garden

328732


Network of Veterinary Services in Aurangabad District

Sr.No.

Taluka

Veterinary Centres

Veterinary

 

 

Sub-Centres

1

Aurangabad

1.Vet.Hospital Aurangabad Head Quarter

1. Pal

2.Veternary Centres Aurangabad City

2.Phulambari

Cantonment

3. Mali Wada

3.Kingaon

4.Karmad

4.Chikalthana

5.Pimpri

5.harsul

6.Gocatgaon

6.shekta

7.Ladsawangi

7.Ganori

8. Dhamam Gaon

8.Chitepimpal gaon

9.kumbhe Phal

10.Naigaon

11.Bhiddon

12. Warud Qzai

2

Kannad

1.Kannad

1.Karanjkheda

2.Nagad

2.Wasdi

3.Deogaon Rangori

3Chopner

4.Chincholi

4.Bahirgaon

5.Nachmvee

5.Hatnur

6.Aurala

6.Wadner

7.Mulwadi

7.Dealana

8.Chilkalthana

9.Borsar

3

Gangapur

1.Gangapur

1.Waluj

2.Turkabad Kharadi

3.Shendur vad

4.Siddhnath wad gaon

5.kaigaon Taka

6.Dongaon

7.Kate Pipalagaon

8.Jambhada

9.Gajgaon

4 Khuldabad 1.Khuldabad V.D. 1.Kasabkheda
    2.Bajar Sawangi 2.Takli Raja
    3.Sultanpur 3.Gaue borgaon
    4.Ghodegaon VAC. 4.Bodkhar
       

5

Vaijapur

1.Vaijapur v.D.

2.lasurgaon

3.Shivur

4.Manur

5.Loni

6.Mahalgaon VAC

7.Sawkheda gangapur

8.Viregaon

9.khandala

10.Gadhepimpalgaon

11.Dahegaon

12.Babhulgaon

13.Nagthana

14.Manegaon

15.Dhondalgaon

6

Paithan

1.paithan

1.Apegaon

2.Adule

2.Wahegaon

3.Dharkin

3.Deogaon

4.Pachod

4.Rahatgaon

5.Bihamavdua

5.kadethan

6.Porgaon

6.Adgaon

7.Dawalwadi

8.Thergaon

9.Bidkin

10.Balanagar

11.Dhakephae

12.Chitepimpalgaon

13.Bokud jalgaon

7

Sillod

1.Sillod

1.Borgaon

2.Vadod Bajzr

2.Golegaon

3.Bharadi

3.Shivana

4.Ajintha

4.Udamgaon

5.Ghatnanda

5.Babra

6.Panvardod

6.Nillod

7.Palod

7.Alland

8.Anvi

8.Andhari

9.Palsi

9.Amthana

10.jabahi

8

Soegaon

1.Soegaon

2.Barati

3.Sawad Bajor

4.Fardapur

5.Godegaon

6.Wadgaon TAjaji

 



District Information Officer District Industries Officer

Earthquakes

Planning Assumptions

Earthquakes have large spatial and temporal impacts. Resource requirements are both  intensive and extensive for management of earthquakes, in terms of  the number of agencies involved and the nature of coordination required.

Lead Agencies

v      The lead  agencies involved in the management of earthquakes are revenue, police,  fire, and medical services.

v      Due to extensive damage to infrastructure, the Telecommunication, MSEB, MWSSB and Public Works Departments play an important role in the management of this disaster.

v      As a result of earthquakes, floods and epidemics can also occur.  Therefore stress is laid on measures taken to ensure coordination with health and irrigation departments. 

Nature of Damages

The impact of earthquakes differs for urban and rural areas, primarily because of the nature of infrastructure, quality of housing and occupational differences. In rural areas, it is primarily the housing and physical structures (including irrigation infrastructure) which may suffer extensive damage, without necessarily destroying the crops.

In urban areas, in addition to housing and physical infrastructures, it may also disturb the service infrastructure such as water supply, sewage, telephones, electricity etc., which are essentially underground installations and hence exposed to a direct impact.

Possible Impacts

v      Effects on Individual

Ø           Loss of Life

Ø           Injuries demanding surgical  needs

Ø           Family disruption

Specific demands raised or required 

Ø            Orthopedic surgery and fractures needing treatment

Ø            Individuals trapped under debris need to be located and rescued which calls for not only earth moving equipments, but the services of sniffer dogs.

Ø            Expertise of fire brigade and defence services may be essential in the rescue operations.

Ø            In case of separation of family members information counters  play an important role.

Ø            In case of family disruption resulting from death of major earner, economic rehabilitation of the family may have to be planned as a long-term strategy.

Ø            Loss of life, property and livestock may require damage assessment procedures to avoid litigations and delays in gratuitous relief and compensation.

v      Damage caused

Ø           Houses                                                                                                                      

Ø           Personal Belongings                                                                                                                       

Ø           Livestock  

Specific demands raised or required

Ø            Partially damaged houses needs technical inspection to decide the habitation worthiness and the extent of repairs required.

Ø            Certain partially damaged houses may require demolition.

Ø            As far as possible, reconstruction will take place on the same sites to avoid delays, secure cultural continuity and avoid costly land purchase. In extreme situations,  new sites for resettlement may have to be identified when removal of rubble and debris is non-viable.

Ø            Salvaging personal belongings from the debris needs clearance from technical personnel to ensure safety of persons engaged.

Ø            As far as possible, family members only will be permitted to salvage their individual family belongings.

v      Damage to infrastructure resulting in disruption of services                                                                                                 

Ø           Buildings

Ø           Dams                                                                                                                        

Ø           Bridges                                                                                                                      

Ø           Road Surface and Rail Lines                                                                                                                    

Ø           Power Stations                                                                                                                              

Ø           Water pipelines and water tanks                                                                                                               

Ø           Sewer lines                                                                                                                                   

Ø           Underground Cables                                                                                                                      

Specific demands raised or required

Ø            Care needs to be taken to ensure that all electrical supplies to damaged area are disconnected promptly by MSEB.

Ø            Underground cables need thorough inspection before power is restored.

Ø            Breaches or cracks in the dam need Irrigation Department to secure the breaches or grouting the cracks.

Ø            In case of damage to bridges, relief operations may require temporary bridges which can be put up with the assistance of army.

Ø            Certain roads needing resurfacing will need immediate action from PWD.

Ø            MWSSB in consultations with health authorities should restore  existing water supply with necessary repairs. This may call for replacement of pipelines or arrangements for storage in portable PVC water tanks.

Ø            In some cases, restoration of existing water supply may be time-consuming and therefore water tankers may have to be pressed into service.

Ø            Identification of nearby water sources and checking water’s  potability  may also be required.

Ø            Damage to sewer lines is to be looked into. Alternate arrangements by way of temporary latrines (technical details given on Pg. No ) may have to be constructed.

Ø            Extensive damage to residential buildings resulting in disruption of telecommunication facilities requires provision/installation of public telephones (PCO) to facilitate communication.

Ø            Damage to hospital, school buildings and other public facilities may disrupt the services. In such a case restoration of services through temporary arrangements is the first priority.

Ø            PWD may have to take repairs or reconstruction of such public facilities on a priority basis.

v      Environmental Effects                                                                                                                   

Ø           Alteration in river and stream flow

Ø           Liquefaction                                                                                                                                  

Specific demands raised or required

Ø            Areas indicating signs of liquefaction should be declared out of bounds and strict vigil should be kept by police to prohibit  trespassing.

Ø            Foundations of the building in the area prone to liquefaction need technical assessment.

Ø            Alteration in river and stream flow particularly when it covers a settlement create immediate demands for evacuation and relief till such time that the areas for new settlement identified and rehabilitation works are executed.

v      Economic and Social consequences

Ø           Loss of livelihood                                                                                                                           

Ø           Disruption of market and Loss in production                                                                                                          

Ø           Migration                                                                                                                   

Ø           Disruption of social structure including breakdown of social order and organisations                                                                                         

Ø           Law and order problem                                                                                                                  

Ø           Psychological after-effects such as individual trauma and depression                                                                                                               

Specific demands raised or required

In addition to immediate relief requirements for effective and early recovery process, checking migration

Ø            restoration of production units, and employment avenues

Ø            provision of individual counselling and community counselling

Ø            Reconstruction of social structures and organisation of community requires participation of non-governmental organisations District administration must invite or coopt voluntary agencies to ensure this aspect.

Ø            For combating depression, engage people in all possible activities related to relief and rehabilitation through a deliberate strategy of community participation.


v      Secondary effects                                                                                                                          

Ø           Fires                                                                                                                          

Ø           Rains                                                                                                                         

Ø           Landslides                                                                                                                 

Specific demands raised or required

Ø            Fires resulting from earthquake are essentially a result of damage to infrastructure such as power supply.

Ø            Immediate service of fire brigade is essential to check further damage.

Ø            Immediate discontinuation  of power would restrict the possibility of occurrence to a large extent.

Ø            Rains following earthquakes essentially disrupt rescue and relief operations. Rescue and relief teams therefore must prepare themselves in anticipation and get community cooperation to overcome such difficulties.

Ø            Rains also have implication for storage of food, fuel for cooking (firewood or coal) and fodder for the cattle. Protective structures therefore for the storage of all relief material becomes essential. Plastic materials and water-proof containers are required.

Ø            Damage to road access due to landslides needs immediate clearing and PWD has to keep itself prepared for such an eventuality.

Ø            Settlements on the hill-slope prone to landslides need to be shifted to safer places.

Floods Planning Assumptions

Ø           Floods occur with warning, while flash flood occur with very little warning. 

Ø           Flood prone areas in India are demarcated as either blue or red lines depending on the frequency of occurrence.  Blue lines are those areas where floods can occur once every five years whereas red lines are areas where floods can occur once every hundred years.

Ø           The resource requirements for management of flood is extremely intensive involving large scale mobilization of resources.

Lead Agencies

Ø           The lead  agencies are the revenue, police,  irrigation,  and medical services.

Ø           Extensive damage to infrastructure and public utilities is possible hence the role of  supporting agencies such as MSEB, Telecommunications and PWD  is crucial.

Ø           The loss to crop or plantation demands involvement of Agriculture Department, ZP

Ø           Loss of cattle will bring in the role for Animal Husbandry, ZP.

Ø           The assistance and intervention of the EOC is essential to support the district administration  in the management of these disasters.

Ø           Additionally, secondary disasters such as epidemics  may be caused due to floods and must be monitored by Public Health Department.

Possible Impacts

v      Effects on Individual

Ø           Loss of Life

Ø           Injuries demanding medical attention

Ø           Water-borne infection

Specific demands raised or required

Ø            In most cases, orthopedic surgery, fractures, cuts and bruises need immediate attention.

Ø            Cases of water-borne infection need medication.

Ø            Mass immunisation, when  necessary, to  protect individuals from  water-borne diseases.

Ø            Marooned individuals, including those  trapped on tree-tops and building terraces  need to be located and rescued which calls for boats, or at times helicopter services.

Ø            Alternatively when large sections of community are marooned instead of evacuation it may be necessary to organise dispatch of relief supplies to marooned locations. This creates a special need for transport facility.

Ø            Expertise of fire brigade and defence services  may be essential in the rescue operations.

v      Impact at family level                                                                                                                    

Ø           Separated families                                                                                                                         

Ø           Missing persons                                                                                                                             

Ø           Family disorganisation

Specific demands raised or required

Ø            In case of separation of family members information counters would play an important role.

Ø            In case of family disruption resulting from death of major earner, economic rehabilitation of the family may have to be planned as a long-term strategy.

Ø            Loss of life, property and livestock may require damage assessment procedures to avoid litigations and delays in gratuitous relief and compensation.

v      Damage caused

Ø           Houses                                                                                                                      

Ø           Personal Belongings                                                                                                                       

Ø           Livestock                                                                                                                   

Ø           Crops and plantations

Ø           Land

Specific demands raised or required

Ø            Partially damaged houses needs technical inspection to decide the habitation worthiness and the extent of repairs required.

Ø            Certain partially damaged houses may require demolition.

Ø            As far as possible, reconstruction should take place on the same sites to avoid delays, secure cultural continuity and avoid costly land purchase. In extreme situations,  new sites for resettlement may have to be identified when removal of rubble and debris is non-viable.

Ø            Salvaging personal belongings from the debris needs clearance from technical personnel to ensure safety of persons engaged.

Ø            As far as possible, family members only should be permitted to salvage their individual family belongings.

Ø            Damage to crops, plantations or agriculture land will need a long-term intervention.

v      Damage to infrastructure and disruption of services                                                                             

Ø           Buildings

Ø           Godowns and storages

Ø           Dams                                                                                                                        

Ø           Bridges                                                                                                                      

Ø           Road Surface and Rail Lines                                                                                                                    

Ø           Power Stations                                                                                                                              

Ø           Water pipelines and water tanks                                                                                                               

Ø           Sewer lines                                                                                                                                   

Ø           Underground Cables                                                                                                                      

Ø           Ports and Jetties                                                                                                                            

Ø           Communication Lines

Specific demands raised or required

Ø             Care needs to be taken to ensure that all electrical supplies to damaged area are disconnected promptly by MSEB.

Ø             Underground cables need thorough inspection before power is restored.

Ø             Damage to electric poles and transmission lines needs restoration.

Ø             Breaches or cracks in the dam need Irrigation Department to secure the breaches or grouting the cracks.

Ø             In case of damage to bridges, relief operations may require temporary bridges which can be put up with the assistance of army.

Ø             Certain roads needing resurfacing will need immediate action from PWD.

Ø             Roads blocked due to uprooting of trees and electric poles may need to be cleared on a priority basis.

Ø             MWSSB in consultations with health authorities should restore  existing water supply with necessary repairs. This may call for replacement of pipelines or arrangements for storage in portable PVC water tanks.

Ø             In some cases, restoration of existing water supply may be time-consuming and therefore water tankers may have to be pressed into service.

Ø             Identification of nearby water sources and checking the potability of the same may also be required.

Ø             Damage or choking of  sewer lines is one of the most ticklish issue. Alternate arrangements by way of temporary latrines (technical details given on Pg. No ) may have to be constructed.

Ø             Extensive damage to residential buildings resulting in disruption of telecommunication facilities requires provision of public telephones (PCO) to facilitate communication.

Ø             Damage to hospital, school buildings and other public facilities may disrupt the services. In such a case restoration of services through temporary arrangements is the first priority.

Ø             PWD may have to take repairs or reconstruction of such public facilities on a priority basis.

Ø             Disposal of damaged foodgrains is one of the major step and needs community cooperation.

Ø             Provision for distribution of cooked food or dry rations may have to be made.

v      Environmental Effects                                                                                                                   

Ø           soil erosion                                                                                                                 

Ø           silting                                                                                                                         

Ø           water pollution                                                                                                                               

Ø           denudation of land

Ø           increase in salinity

Specific demands raised or required

Ø             Silting in residential areas and buildings is one of the major problems requiring extensive community involvement.

Ø             NGOs have demonstrated a tremendous capacity to mobilise community participation in desilting operations for reoccupancy of the residences and also the wells providing drinking water.

Ø             Agriculture department may have to undertake soil-testing and propose appropriate measures for restoration of agriculture land.


v      Economic and Social consequences

Ø           Loss of livelihood                                                                                                                           

Ø           Disruption of market and Loss in production

Ø           Migration                                                                                                                   

Ø           Disruption of social structure including breakdown of social order

Ø           and community organisations                                                                                                          

Ø           Law and order problem                                                                                                                  

Ø           Psychological after-effects like depression,  trauma etc.

Specific demands raised or required

In addition to immediate relief requirements for effective and early recovery process and  checking migration

Ø             restoration of production units, and employment avenues

Ø             provision of individual counselling and community counselling

Ø             Reconstruction of social structures and organisation of community requires a professional intervention which can best come from non-governmental organisations Voluntary agencies will have to be invited or coopted for relief activities to ensure this aspect.

Ø             For combating depression, engage people in all possible activities related to relief and rehabilitation through a deliberate strategy of community participation.

v      Secondary effects                                                                                                                          

Ø           Epidemics                                    

Ø           Landslides

Specific demands raised or required

Ø             Rescue and relief teams  must be alert to the possibility of outbreak of epidemics and therefore ensure standards of services with respect to storage, cooking, and handling of food materials as also disposal of waste in relief camps, medical centres and feeding centres.

Ø             Water-quality monitoring mechanisms will have to be set-up to prevent  outbreak of epidemics.

Ø             Rains also have implication for storage of food, fuel for cooking (firewood or coal) and fodder for the cattle. Protective structures therefore for the storage of all relief material becomes essential. Plastic materials and water-proof containers are required.

Ø             Damage to road access due to landslides needs immediate clearing and PWD has to keep itself prepared for such an eventuality.

Ø             Settlements on the hill-slope prone to landslides need to be shifted to safer places.

Epidemics

Planning Assumptions

Ø           The existing  water quality monitoring and vector control programmes reduces the possibility of spread of epidemics to a considerable extent.

Ø           Efficient response from  pathological and testing laboratories helps in early diagnosis of the possible epidemic.

Lead Agencies

Ø           The revenue and health department inlcuding the medical service is the main agency involved in disaster management during epidemics.

Ø           In the case of  epidemics accompanying floods the water supply and sanitation department, MWSSB and  irrigation department are the support agencies

Ø           Apart from these support services, assistance is also sought from the police and home guards, public works department, state transport and the media.  

Possible Impacts

v      Effects on Individual

Ø           Loss of Life

Ø           Diseases needing Epidemiological Treatment

Specific demands raised or required

Ø             Mass immunisation, when necessary,  to  protect individuals.

Ø             In some cases, existing water supply may be contaminated and therefore water tankers may have to be pressed into service.

Ø             Identification of nearby water sources and checking the potability of the same may also be required.

Ø             Rescue and relief teams  must be alert to the possibility of spread  of epidemics and therefore ensure standards of services with respect to storage, cooking, and handling of food materials as also disposal of waste in relief camps, medical centres and feeding centres.

Ø             Water-quality monitoring mechanisms will have to be set-up to prevent  spread  of epidemics.

Ø             In case of vector-borne diseases, the exact vector and related control methods will have to be followed. The required materials are listed on (pg. No)

Ø             Life-saving drugs including saline will be required in large quantities

Ø             Disposable kits for treatment of affected people and arrangements for proper disposal of these.

Ø             Personal protection kits for medical personnel and volunteers assisting in treatment of patients.

Ø             Arrangements for disposal of personal belongings and other solid waste materials.

Ø             Monitoring arrangements including testing facilities with the help of laboratories and hospitals.

v      Economic and Social consequences

Ø           Migration

Ø           Evacuation

Ø           Law and order problem

Ø           Psychological after-effects especially isolation

Specific demands raised or required

In addition to immediate medical relief requirements for effective and early recovery process and  checking migration

Ø           restoration of potable water supply 

Ø           provision of

Þ          quarantine of infected cases at family and hospital level

Þ          programme of immunisation

Þ          water quality monitoring

Þ          pathological testing laboratories

Þ          individual counselling

Þ          family counselling

Ø           Involvement of  NGOs in mobilising community efforts for the control of epidemics by ensuring  standards of environmental sanitation, disposal of waste and personal hygiene.

Road Accidents

Planning Assumptions

Ø           The major road accidents are highly localised.

Ø           The response machinery that is to be activated is at a much more local level

Ø           In case of road accidents involving toxic and highly inflammable materials, there is  need for temporary evacuation.

Lead Agencies

Ø           The lead  agencies are  revenue, police and the regional transport office.

Ø           In   major accidents involving  loss of life and injuries to  a large number of people, services of  agencies such as fire services, health department   will be needed

Ø           In the case of a vehicle plunge in the river,  services of divers for rescue operations are required.

Possible Impacts

v      Effects on Individuals

Ø           Loss of Life

Ø           Trauma Care

Ø           Burns

Ø           Injuries demanding surgical treatment

Ø           Poisoning or exposure to toxic material

Specific demands raised or required

Ø             In most cases, orthopedic surgery and fractures need immediate attention.

Ø             Individuals trapped in the vehicles need to be rescued which at times calls for metal cutting devices.

Ø             Expertise of fire brigade and defence services may be essential when the accident involves vehicles carrying hazardous chemicals, toxic materials or explosives.

Ø             Divers may be required if the accident involves a vehicle falling off a bridge into water.

Ø             The  police may require to cordon off the area.

Ø             Chemical accidents may generate a demand for treatment for burns and exposure to poisonous substances which may mean a specialised service not generally available along the highways.

Ø             Nature of injuries may demand immediate transfer of injured to centres offering trauma care.

Ø             Loss of life, property and goods may require damage assessment procedures to avoid litigations and delays in gratuitous relief and compensation including insurance.

v      Damage caused

Ø           Vehicles

Ø           Goods

Specific demands raised or required

Ø           Salvaging the goods from the accident site needs clearance from technical personnel to ensure safety of persons engaged.

v      Environmental Effects

Air pollution if vehicle carrying hazardous chemicals are involved

v      Disruption of services

Ø           Road network

Ø           Traffic

Specific demands raised or required

Ø             The spills from vehicles carrying hazardous materials may require stoppage of traffic and cleaning of road surface. Various materials are recommended depending on the nature of spill. Also, specialised  agencies may have to be called for undertaking spill cleaning operations.

Ø             Diversion of traffic resulting from such accidents may require traffic control to give information  at various entry points located also far away (which need quick identification) from the site of accident so as to avoid inconvenience to the travellers.

Ø             Special cranes may be required for clearing the accident site.

v      Economic and Social consequences

Law and order problem                                                                                                              

Specific demands raised or required

Ø             Security of goods and materials in the vehicles involved in the accident needs protection. The details of goods need to be officially recorded.

v      Secondary Effects

Ø           Fires

Ø           Gas leak affecting settlements near the accident site

Specific demands raised or required

Ø             It may be necessary to inform the settlements around to take necessary precautionary measures, if the accident involves leakage of toxic gases.

Ø             It may be advisable to send a team of medical personnel from poison centres to visit the settlements around the accident site when toxic leak is reported.

Fires

Lead Agencies

Ø           The main agencies involved in disaster management are the revenue department, local fire service (municipality or municipal corporation), medical services (hospitals) and police (local police station),

Ø           In the event of a major fire, the local fire service would need to co-ordinate with the MSEB and the  water supply department for assistance in containment of the fire.

Ø           Major evacuation may  call for support from DCR.

Possible Impacts

v      Effects on Individuals

Ø           Burns

Ø           Injuries demanding surgical treatment

Ø           Loss of Life

Specific demands raised or required

Ø            Serious burn cases may need immediate transport for admission  to burn wards in the hospital

Ø            In many  cases, panic behaviour may lead to injuries requiring treatment for orthopedic surgery and fractures.

Ø            Expertise of fire brigade  may be essential in the rescue operations and control of fire particularly when population density is very high.

Ø            In case of separation of family members information counters would play an important role. (This is normally observed in case of fires in large slums)

Ø            In case of family disruption resulting from death of major earner, economic rehabilitation of the family may have to be planned as a long-term strategy.

Ø            Loss of life, property and livestock may require damage assessment procedures to avoid litigations and delays in gratuitous relief and compensation.

v      Damage caused

Ø           House                                                                                                                       

Ø           Personal Belongings                                                                                                                       

Specific demands raised or required

Ø             Partially damaged houses needs technical inspection to decide the habitation worthiness and the extent of repairs required.

Ø             Certain partially damaged houses may require demolition.

Ø             Transit arrangements may have to be identified when the structure needs reconstruction.

Ø             Salvaging personal belongings from the debris needs clearance from technical personnel to ensure safety of persons engaged.

Ø             As far as possible, family members only should be permitted to salvage their individual family belongings.

v      Damage to infrastructure and disruption of services

                                                                                                       

Ø           Buildings                                                                                                                    

Ø           Overhead lines                                                                                                                              

Ø           Communication Lines

Specific demands raised or required

Ø             Care needs to be taken to ensure that all electrical supplies to damaged area are disconnected promptly by MSEB officials in the area.

Ø             Underground cables need thorough inspection before power is restored.

Ø             Extensive damage to residential buildings resulting in disruption of telecommunication facilities requires provision of public telephones (PCO) to facilitate communication.

Ø             Damage to hospital, school buildings and other public facilities may disrupt the services. In such a case restoration of services through temporary arrangements is the first priority.

Ø             PWD may have to take repairs or reconstruction of such public facilities on a priority basis.

Ø             Some fires may demand traffic control measures including identification of alternate routes and diversion of traffic.

Ø             In congested areas controlling curious onlookers may block movement of rescue and fire workers. The police will need to cordon off the area for smooth operations.

v      Economic  consequences

Ø           Loss of livelihood                                                                                                                           

Ø           disruption of market                                                                                                                       

Ø           loss in production                                                                                                                           

Specific demands raised or required

In addition to immediate relief requirements for effective and early recovery process,

Ø           restoration of markets, production units, employment avenues

Ø           Provision of damage assessment

Industrial and Chemical Accidents

Planning Assumptions

Ø           Off-site industrial accidents are in the form of fires, explosions and toxic gas leaks.

Ø           The responsibility of declaring an industrial accident as off-site rests with the management of the industrial unit where the accident has occurred.

Ø           The most crucial decision  in off-site industrial accident management is the recognition / identification of the stage at which the  responsibility is handed over from the  management to the public authorities.

Ø           The public authority will be  the District Collector when the disaster is likely to impact a larger area.

Lead Agencies

The main participating agencies in the management of off-site industrial disasters are :

Ø           revenue

Ø           police, fire, medical services

Ø           civil defence agencies

Ø           public works department

Ø           Industry

Ø           MARG

Ø           Public Health and regulatory environmental agencies.

Ø           To enable effective immediate response, specialists are required to

¨       provide fast, reliable information on the properties of the substance released,

¨       its potential hazard,

¨       protective equipment required,

¨       containment and control measures to be taken and

¨       advice on the decontamination and emergency termination activities required.

Possible Impacts

v      Effects on Individual                                                                                                                     

Ø           Loss of Life

Ø           Burns

Ø           Injuries demanding Surgical  treatment

Ø           Exposure to  toxic material

Specific demands raised or required

Ø             In most cases, orthopedic surgery and fractures need immediate attention.

Ø             Expertise of fire brigade, mutual aid and response groups (MARG), may be essential.

Ø             The  police may require to cordon off the area.

Ø             Chemical accidents may generate a demand for treatment for burns and exposure to poisonous substances which may mean a specialised service  not generally available with medical practitioners.

Ø             Nature of injuries may demand immediate transfer of injured to poison centres.

Ø             Loss of life, property and goods may require damage assessment procedures to avoid litigations and delays in gratuitous relief and compensation including insurance.

Ø             Areas indicating spread of toxic gases should be declared out of bounds and strict vigil should be kept by police to prohibit  trespassing.

Ø             Alteration in  wind direction when  it covers a settlement create immediate demands for evacuation and relief till such time that an all-clear signal is given.

v      Environmental Effects                                                                                               

Ø           water pollution                                                                                                                               

Ø           air pollution

Ø           effect on vegetation

Specific demands raised or required

Ø             On a long-term basis monitoring of air, water  and soil quality will have to be carried out.

v      Disruption of services                                                                                                                   

Ø           Road network                                                                                                                                

Ø           Electricity                                                                                                                  

Ø           Water supply                                  

v      Economic and Social consequences

Ø           Loss of livelihood                                                                                                                           

Ø           Disruption of market

Ø           Damage to food stocks                                                                                                                  

Ø           Loss in production                                                                                                                          

Ø           Migration                                                                                                                   

Ø           Law and order problem                                                                                                                  

Ø           Social and Psychological effects                                                                                                               

Specific demands raised or required

In addition to immediate relief requirements for effective and early recovery process and  checking migration

Ø             restoration of production units, employment avenues

Ø             provision of individual counselling and community counselling

Ø             For combating depression, engage people in all possible activities related to relief and rehabilitation through a deliberate strategy of community participation.

Cyclones

Planning Assumptions

Cyclones can be predicted sufficiently in advance but its impact location over land is uncertain.

Ø      The resource requirements for management of cyclone impact  is extremely intensive involving large scale mobilization of resources.

Lead Agencies

Ø      The lead  agencies are the Fire, Police and Health departments.

Ø      Extensive damage to infrastructure and public utilities is possible hence the role of  supporting agencies such as MSEB, Telecommunications and PWD  is crucial.

Ø      The loss to crop or plantation demands involvement of Agriculture Department

Ø      Loss of cattle will bring in the role for Animal Husbandry.

Ø      The assistance and intervention of the EOC is essential to support the district administration  in the management of these disasters.

Ø      Additionally, secondary disasters such as epidemics  may be caused due to floods resulting from cyclones  and must be monitored by Public Health Department.

Possible Impacts

v      Effects on Individual

Ø      Loss of Life

Ø      Injuries demanding surgical  needs

Ø      Family disorganisation

Specific demands raised or required

Ø      In most cases, orthopedic surgery, fractures, cuts and bruises need immediate attention.

Ø      Mass immunisation is necessary to  protect individuals from  water-borne diseases.

Ø      Marooned individuals, including those  trapped on tree-tops and building terraces  (in  case of tidal wave) need to be located and rescued which calls for boats, or at times helicopter services.

Ø      Alternatively when large sections of community are marooned instead of evacuation it

      may be necessary to organise dispatch of relief supplies to marooned locations. This

      creates a special need for transport facility.

Ø      Expertise of fire brigade and defence services (Navy, Coast Guards) may be essential in

      the rescue operations.

v      Damage caused

[Cyclones may be accompanied by heavy rains, or at times  tidal waves]. 

Ø      Houses                                                                                                                        

Ø      Personal Belongings                                                                                                                         

Ø      Livestock                                                                                                                     

Ø      Crops and Plantations

Ø      Forests

Specific demands raised or required

Ø      Partially damaged houses needs technical inspection to decide the habitation worthiness

      and the extent of repairs required.

Ø      Certain partially damaged houses may require demolition.

Ø      New sites for resettlement may have to be identified when removal of rubble and debris is non-viable.

Ø      Salvaging personal belongings from the debris needs clearance from technical personnel to ensure safety of persons engaged.

Ø      As far as possible, family members only should be permitted to salvage their individual family   belongings.

v      Damage to infrastructure and disruption in services

Ø      Buildings

Ø      Godowns and storages

Ø      Dams                                                                                                                           

Ø      Bridges                                                                                                                        

Ø      Road Surface and Rail Lines                                                                                                                       

Ø      Power Stations and Power Lines                                                                                                       

Ø      Water Tanks                                                                                                                

Ø      Ports and Jetties                                                                                                                               

Ø      Communication Lines

Ø      Railway Signals

Specific demands raised or required

Ø      Care needs to be taken to ensure that all electrical supplies to damaged area are

      disconnected promptly by MSEB.

Ø      Overhead lines need thorough inspection before power is restored.

Ø      Breaches or cracks in the dam need Irrigation Department to secure the breaches or

      grouting the cracks.

Ø      In case of damage to bridges, relief operations may require temporary bridges which

      can be put up with the assistance of army.

Ø      Certain roads needing resurfacing will need immediate action from PWD.

Ø      MWSSB in consultations with health authorities should restore  existing water supply

      with necessary repairs. This may call for replacement of pipelines or arrangements for

      storage in portable PVC water tanks.

Ø      In some cases, restoration of existing water supply may be time-consuming and

      therefore water tankers may have to be pressed into service.

Ø      Identification of nearby water sources and checking the potability of the same may also

      be required.

Ø      Choking of sewer lines is one of the most ticklish issue. Immediate  arrangements for

      clearing the sewer lines is necessary.

Ø      Piped gas supply should be immediately terminated in the affected area to avoid

      secondary consequences. If necessary, and feasible gas cylinders should be supplied till

      the gas line is checked thoroughly and  restored.

Ø      Extensive damage to residential buildings resulting in disruption of telecommunication

     facilities requires provision of public telephones (PCO) to facilitate communication.

Ø      Damage to hospital, school buildings and other public facilities may disrupt the services.

Ø      In such a case restoration of services through temporary arrangements is the first  

Ø      priority.

Ø      PWD may have to take repairs or reconstruction of such public facilities on a priority

     basis.

Ø      Disposal of damaged foodgrains is one of the major step and needs community 

     cooperation.

Ø      Provision for distribution of cooked food or dry rations may have to be made.

Ø      Rains also have implication for storage of food, fuel for cooking (firewood or coal) and  

     fodder for the cattle. Protective structures therefore for the storage of all relief material

     becomes essential. Plastic materials and water-proof containers are required.

v      Environmental Effects                                                                                                                   

Ø      soil erosion                                                                                                                   

Ø      silting                                                                                                                            

Ø      water pollution                                                                                                                                 

Ø      increase in salinity

Specific demands raised or required

Ø      Silting in residential areas and buildings is one of the major problems requiring extensive  

      community involvement.

Ø      NGOs have demonstrated a tremendous capacity to mobilise community participation in

     desalting operations for reoccupancy of the residences and also the wells providing   

     drinking water.

Ø      Agriculture department may have to undertake soil-testing and propose appropriate 

      measures for restoration of agriculture land.

v      Economic and Social consequences

Ø      Loss of livelihood                                                                                                                             

Ø      Disruption of market and Loss in production                                                                                                             

Ø      Disruption of social structure               including breakdown of social order

Ø      and community organisations                                                                                                             

Ø      Migration                                                                                                                     

Ø      Law and order problem                                                                                                                    

Ø      Psychological after-effects                                                                                                               

Specific demands raised or required

Ø      In addition to immediate relief requirements,  for effective and early recovery process and  checking migration

Ø      restoration of production units and employment avenues

Ø      provision of individual counselling and community counselling

Ø      Reconstruction of social structures and organisation of community requires a professional

      intervention which can best come from non-governmental organisations Voluntary   

      agencies will have to be invited or coopted for relief activities to ensure this aspect.

Ø      For combating depression, engage people in all possible activities related to relief and rehabilitation through a deliberate strategy of community participation.

v      Secondary effects             

Ø           Epidemics

Ø           Landslides

Specific demands raised or required

Ø      Rescue and relief teams  must be alert to the possibility of outbreak of epidemics and therefore ensure standards of services with respect to storage, cooking, and handling of food materials as also disposal of waste in relief camps, medical centres and feeding centres.

Ø      Water-quality monitoring mechanisms will have to be set-up to prevent  outbreak of epidemics.

Ø      Damage to road access due to landslides needs immediate clearing and PWD has to keep itself prepared for such an eventuality.

Ø      Settlements on the hill-slope prone to landslides need to be shifted to safer places.

Non-governmental Organisations (NGOs) and Voluntary Agencies

The non-governmental organisations and voluntary agencies play an important role in disaster management  and provide a strong band of committed volunteers with experience in managing the disasters. Their strength  lies in the choice of their manpower, the informality in operations and flexibility in procedures. These organisations enjoy a fair degree of autonomy and hence can respond to changing needs immediately.

The NGOs can be assigned specific locations and roles by the District Collector to undertake relief work within the overall institutional framework. The list of NGOs in the district with their specific nature of work, and specific roles of NGOs during disaster management is given in the following sections. These NGOs would work in close co-ordination with the district administration and maintain the standards of services, information exchange and reporting requirements so as to enable the Collector to have a total picture of resource availability, disbursements and requirements.  As and where possible, NGOs may also be able to improve the quality of delivery of welfare services in the camps organised and manned by administration.

List of NGOs and specific assistance available from them

List  of Non-Government Organisation (NGOS) in Aurangabad District

Sr. No

Name of the Organisation

Address

Telephone No.

 

 

 

1

Lions Club of Aurangabad (Chief )

Bajrang Chowk

482153

482973

2

Lions Club of Aurangabad (Centre)

Chintamani Colony

331854

3

Lions Club of Aurangabad Midtown

Opp.Gadiya Park

332852

332851

4

Lions Club of Aurangabad Chikalthana

N-3, CIDCO

482564

482034

5

Lions Club of Aurangabad CIDCO

N-4, CIDCO

486492

332136

6

Lions Club of Aurangabad Waluj

Bhagwati Colony

333631

333715

7

Leo Club of Chilkalthana (Junior)

 --

 --

8

Leo Club of Chikalthana (Senior)

 --

 --

9

Rotract Club of Aurangabad

5,Trimurthy Complex Jawahar

 --

Colony

10

Rotract Club of Aurangabad (West)

New osmanpura Near Police

 --

Station

11

Rotract Club of Aurangabad (Main)

C/o Wami Rekha 45, Saraong

 --

Society,

12

Rotract Clubof Aurangabad (Midtown)

C/o Vishwas Ajit Osmanpura

331652

13

Rotract Club of Aurangabad (New Town)

C/o Makrawd Paithankar

 --

14

Rotract Club  of Aurangabad(Main)

C/o Dr. Borker R.A. Bhakti

 --

Nagar, CIDCO.

15

Rotary Club of Aurangabad (Main)

C/o Deodat Palnitkar Shriphal

332475

Bhagya Nagar

16

Rotary Club of Aurangabad (East)

Osmanpura

23131

335567

17

Rotary Club of Aurangabad (Central)

 --

18

Rotary Club of Aurangabad (Midtown)

C/o, jaggan nath Mandlik,

337795(o)

Shray Nagar.

337590(R)

19

Indian Development Foundation

C/o S.T. Sonavare Kutwalpura

20

Gaints Group of Aurangabad

Bansilal Nagar.

331788(O)

339199(R)

21

Gaints Group of Aurangabad (Chilkathana)

C/o Shri Mohan Kothari.

485671 (O)

485659(R)

22

Gaints Group of Aurangabad (Waluj)

C/o Shri Jugal Kishore

564145(O)

 Bansilal Nagar.

334365(R)

23

Janarath

19, Samadhan Colony Near

323479

Dist Court.

24

Manav Vikas Prakalp

C/o Shri Ankush Bhalekar

337281

Adalat Road.

25

Priya darshan Bhau Uddeshi Sanstha

236, New Eknath nagar

 -

Osmanpura.

26

Apang Niradhar Vikas Samiti

C/o Shri Ramesh Dhabade

 -

Millcorner A'bad.

27

Arogya Vayasan Mukut Kendra

Manudya, 17, Ranjit Nagar

A'bad

28

Bharti Kanti Dham

C/o A.V.Puranik Dixit Wada,

Nutun Colony, A'bad.

29

Bharti Kissan Sangh

Keshav krupa,47, Pannalal

329089

Nagar, A'bad.

30

Centre for Human Development

B-18,MIDC,Rly Stn. A'bad.

31

City Bus Wahtuk Welfare Committee

C/o Vasant Naryan Solunke

5-9 S.T. Quarter, A'bad.

32

Dashmesh Parivar

Mondha Naka A'bad.

33

Donar's Club

Arihant Nagar, A'bad.

326364

34

Foster Development

C/o Dr.Manvendra Kachode

Khokad pura, A'bad.

35

Health Vision Society

C/o Dr. Charekar Bldg.

Opp.L.I.C.Off. Adalat Road.

36

Hindu Urdu Society

C/o Wajahad Qureshi 3-11-101

Nizamuddin Road, A'bad.

37

Indian Development Foundation

C/o S.T.Sonavane

Kotwalpura, A'bad.

38

Lions Club of Aurangabad (Main)

Pandenivas,Chauraah.

39

Lokmiter Mandal

Raigaon Taluka Kannad.

40

Maharashtra Samaj Seva Mandal

C/o K.S. Narvade, Samrath

Naga, A'bad.

41

Manava Vikas Prakalp

C/o Ankush Bhalekar

Adalat Road, A'bad.s

42

Nath Agro Research Foundaion

C/o N.K. Gopal M.s Nath

Seeds Paith Road.

43

Sardar Jaisingh Cultural & Education

Osmanpura A'bad.

44

Sarva-to-Pari Seva Bihavi Sanatha

N-6, f/1-8, CIDCI, A'bad.

45

Sawali

Pranav, 12, Bhagya Nagar,

333620

Adalat Road, A'bad.

46

Sawal Niradhar Isteri Kalyan Sanstha.

C/o Kamal Vasant Muley.

Bhagya Nagar, A'bad

 -

47

The Marathwada Navjivan Mandal.

C/o Sudha Kaldate Samitra

Colony A'bad.

  

NGOs to be involved in specific activities during disaster management  operations

Encouraging Community Preparedness

Disasters may result in cutting off essential services and in spite of administrative preparedness it may not be possible for the administration to reach out immediately.

Mitigation efforts and  preparation of the disaster management action plan for local areas are essential elements and pre-requisites. Preparedness to a large extent would reduce the impact and the damage. Training and simulation exercises for enhancing the community’s preparedness and response capability will simultaneously strengthen and enhance the capacity of the administration to undertake necessary preparedness or evacuation measures. The district administration is  encouraging and supporting initiatives towards community preparedness measures including formation of Community Emergency Response Teams (CERTs).

On the basis of discussions, apart from the NGOs mentioned earlier, the following Private Sector units, Mahila Mandals and CBOs have been identified as resource groups for involvement in community preparedness measures. They will all undergo training for the same. These Private Sector units, Mahila Mandals,  CBOs, NGOs would adopt a conscious effort towards community level preparedness measures. They would also promote the formation of CERTs.

As a part of general preparedness at  community level, the families in the community would be made conscious about the type of hazard that the household situation presents and the threats  from outside. Also, communities would be encouraged to undertake exercises in risk and vulnerability analysis and preparation of community response plan to possible disasters.  Thus local local disaster management action plans for hot-spot areas in the context of specific vulnerability would be developed. For areas with high concentration of industries MARGs have been set-up, whereas for areas prone to other types of disasters Community Emergency Response Teams (CERTs) are being set-up. Special efforts have also been taken to involve Sugar Co-operatives towards Community Preparedness Measures.

Private Sector Units in Aurangabad

Traders Associations

Sr.

Name of

Address

Telephone

No.

Association

Office

Resi

1

Aurangabad Automobiles

C/o Bharat Engineering

& Tyres Dealer's

company,Opp.High Court

Association.

Aurangabad.

   i) President

482793

331919

   II) Secretary

33469

 --

2

The General Kirana

C/oShri Mansukhlalji Bantiya,

Merchant's Association

Juna Mondha, Aurangabad,

   i) President

 --

 --

   II) Secretary

323431

323900

3

Retai Kirana Merchants

C/o Shri Ram Chandra

Association

S.Khandre Gulmandi,

 --

 --

Aurangabad.

4

Marathwada Chemists &

C/o Yeshwant Agencies

32731

 --

Drugists Association

Aushadhi Bhavan,

Aurangabad.

5

Aurangabad Furniture

C/o Shri K.C.Suryawanshi,

Dealer's & Manufacturer's

Raja Bazar

323913

 --

Tilak Path,Aurangabad

328803

6

Aurangabad Consumer's

Supari Hanuman Road,

324888

 --

Products Associations

Aurangabad.

7

Aurangabad Kapad

C/o Shri Bhagchandji

Dealer's Association

Binayake, Tilak Path,

Aurangabad.

   i) President

329605

324305

   II) Secretary

329137

327171

8

Aurangabad Timber

C/o Shri Ramji Devshi Patel

Merchant's & Saw mills

Shankar Vijay Saw mill,

Association

Kranti chowk, Aurangabad.

   i) President

334659

333687

   II) Secretary

332797

 ---

9

Saraf Association

C/o Shri Suresh Mohanlal

326090

 --

warma Kasari Bazar,

Aurangabad.

10

Aurangabad Readymade

C/o Anil kumar

Garments Association

Sahuji,Apsara Dresses City

325064

336717

Chowk, Aurangabad.

11

Aurangabad Paper,

Chadda Jeet Papers &

336592

 --

Stationery & Book

 cards Opp.Janta Bazar

Dealer's Association

, S.B. Colony,

337588

 --

Aurangabad.

12

Aurangabad Hotel

Hotel Mewad Nageshwar

 --

 --

Associaton

wadi, Aurangabad.

Aurangabad.

13

Aurangabad Hotel

Akshay deep complex,

484494

 --

Associaton

Near Cidco Bus Stand,

Aurangabad.

Aurangabad.

14

Aurangabad Bakery

Delux Food Products,

333439

 --

Associaton

Cantonment Area,

Aurangabad.

15

Aurangabad Electrical

Mukund Electricals,

337681

 --

Merchants Associaton

Supari Hanuman Road,

Aurangabad.

16

Tax Practitioner's

C/o Shri Bangad C.A.

338832

337520

Associaton

Tapadiya Terrace, Adalat

Road Aurangabad.

17

Aurangabad     Colour

Color Home Tilak Path,

324129

 --

Dealer's Associaton

Associaton

18

Aurangabad  Typewritting

Anil Typewritting Institute,

 --

 --

& Zerox Associaton

Dewan Deodi, Associaton

19

Aurangabad Industrial

Nilesh Enterprises Jafergate

334903

 --

Suppliers Associaton

Mondha Road, Associaton

20

Aurangabad Tailor

K.S.Rao Tailors Tilak Road,

 --

 --

Associaton

Aurangabad

21

Aurangabad Plywood

Girdhardas & Company

333801

 --

Dealers Associaton

 Opp. Mangal Paper Mart,

338021

 Supari Hanuman Road,

 Aurangabad.

22

Aurangabad Petrol &

Print Travel Petrol Pump

329707

Diesel Associaton

 Adalat Road,Aurangabad.

323733

23

Aurangabad T.V.

C/o National Electronics

337418

Dealer's Associaton

Opp. Z.P. Aurangabad

24

Aurangabad

Parchayi Photo Studio,

338444

 --

Photograper's

Sabzi Mandi, Aurangabad

Associaton

25

Aurangabad Kerosene

Chunni Lal Asaram & Co.

337124

 --

Dealer's Associaton

Juna Mondha, Aurangabad

26

Aurangabad Stone

Anjali Marbles Near Abhinay

329987

  --

Dealer's Associaton

Theatre, Aurangabad

27

Aurangabad Agro and

Gokul Seeds Jadhav Mandi,

Fertiliser's Associaton

Aurangabad

28

Aurangabad Opticals

c/o 12, Land Development Bank

324710

Dealer's Associaton

Bulding Karanti Chowk,

335954

Aurangabad

29

Aurangabad  Cinema

Anjali Cinema Khadkeshwar,

331113

 Associaton

Aurangabad

30

Aurangabad Bangle

Om Bangle Store Shah Bazar,

 --

 --

Dealer's Associaton

Aurangabad

31

Aurangabad Watch

Time-N-Tune City Chowk,

336717

 --

Dealer's Associaton

Aurangabad

334975

32

Aurangabad Cutlary &

Premie Traders, Kumbharwada,

337450

 --

General Merchant's

Aurangabad

 Associaton

33

Aurangabad Technical &

Praful Motor garage, Jafargate,

332789

Mechanical Sanghatna

Aurangabad

335772

 Associaton

34

Aurangabad STD/PCO

Mass Communication, STD/PCO

334263

484495

 Associaton

Centre, Osmanpura,

331244

Aurangabad

35

Aurangabad Cycle

Vijay Cycle Mart, Paithan gate,

332470

332378

Dealer;s Associaton

Aurangabad

36

Aurangabad Cantonment

No.261, Dana Bazar Cantonment

337060

 --

Vayapari Associaton

Aurangabad

37

The Semi wholesaller &

Sugar Traders, Old Mondha,

337215

 --

General Merchant's

Aurangabad

 Associaton

38

Aurangabad Iron & Steel

Maharashtra Iron & General

323211

325471

Merchant's Associaton

Stores, Aurangabad

39

Aurangabad  Press

Paper Trading Corpn. Dawan

333043

 Associaton

Devadi, Aurangabad

333961

40

Aurangabad Machinary

Kiran Machinary Store,Shahganj

333593

Dealers Association

Aurangabad.

41

Aurangabad Cement

C/o Radha Kishan Rana

 

Dealers Association

Old Mondha Aurangabad.

42

Aurangabad Transport

c/o Abbas Transport ,old Mondha

332472

Association

Aurangabad.

337772

43

Aurangabad Bhandi

C/o Mr.Suresh Jain,Near

Dealers Association

Nishan Aurangabad

44

Aurangabad Bhajipala

C/o Dada Miyan Coudhari

& Fruits Dealers

Bhaji Market Shahganj A'bad

Association

45

Aurangabad Sports

Champions' Boutiques

Dealers Association

Kranti Chowk Aurangabad.

46

Aurangabad Tel-Vikri

C/o Shri Vasudeo rao

Merchants' Association

Kasbekar Khadkeshwar

Aurangabad.

47

N-7 Vayapari

C/o Shri Ramesh Gandhi,

482694

Association of CIDCO

N-7, CIDCO,Aurangabad.

48

Aurangabad Chartered

C/o Shri R.H.Charakha,

Accountants' Association

Dwarka Complex

Aurangabad

Cooperatives

537   Coooeratives societies registered in Aurangabad District

List of Sugar Factories in Aurangabad as on 31.3.1998

        Sr.No.

Name of Sugar Factory

Taluka

Telephone No.

 

1

Dnyaneshwar Sahkari Sakhar

Paithan

32036

Karkhana,MIDC Paithan

32035

2

Deogri Sahkari Sakhar karkhana,

Aurangabad

633348

3

Siddeshwar S.S.K Ltd Bhavan

Sillod

22470

4

Gangapur S.S.K.Ltd

Gangapupr

21358

5

Kannad  S.S.K.Ltd

Kannad

21054

List of CBOs (Mahila Mandals and Yuvak Mandals) who will work towards community preparedness measures

Talukawise list of Mahila Mandal in District Aurangabad.

Name

Address

Aurangabad city

Adrash Jain Mahila Mandal

Keli Bazar

Gujrati Vanita Mandal

Pan Dariba

Jagrati Mahila Mandal

C/oVidayan Wardhani High

School Deodi Bazar

Jai Tulja Bhavani Mahila

Audhyogik Sahkar Sanstha

N-6,CIDCO

Ladies Club

Labour Colony

Yashodhan Mahila Mandal

Aurangabad

Vimukta jati Bhatkya

Kaikadiwada,Sabzi Mandi

Jamati Mahila Mandal

Mahila Vikas Mandal

H.No.28/B Cantonment

Sphurti Mahila Mandal

Narayani 26-A Secto N-5

CIDCO

Mahila Seva Samiti

Near Subedari

Pallwakar Mahila Vikas Mandal

Madhukar Nagar Hudco

Aurangabad Taluka

Pragati Mahila Mandal

Khodegaon Taluka A'bad

Samta Mahhila Mandal

Vitkheda Taluka A'bad

Shital Mahila Seva Bhavic Sanstha

 --

Names of Mahila Mandals in other districts

Taluka Sillod

Sant Miralani Mahila Mandal

Bhagyashri Mahila Mandal

Sharadhda Mahila Mandal

Llaxmi Mahhila Mandal

Taluka Kannad

Panchshai Mahila Mandal

Amrapali Mahla Mandal

Yashodhara Mahlila Manda

Kala Vikas Mahila Mandal

Taluka Khuldabad

Kranti Mahila Mandal

Pragati Mahila Mandal

Rohini Mahhila Manda

Rambai Mahila Mandal

Taklimali Magaswargiya Mahila Mandal

Aurangabad Taluka

Pallwakar Mahila Vikas Manda

Pragati Mahila Manda

Samta Mahhila Manda

Shital Mahila Seva Bhavic Sanstha

Gangapur Taluka

Rama bai Mahila Manda

Panch Sheel Mahila Manda

Jijamata Mahila Manda

 Savitri bai Mahila Manda

Vaijapur Taluka

Rambai Shrikishan Sanskirti Mahila

Vikas

Mahila Manda

Naunit Mahila Mandal

Laxmi Mahila Manda

janseva Mahila Mandal

Soegaon Taluka

Sanjivani Mahhila Mandal

Parerna Mahhila Manda

Paithan Taluka

kavita mahila Manda

akansha Mahila Mandal

Vaishali Mahila Manda

Yashodhra Mahila Manda

Adersh Mahila Manda

Dnyandeep Mahil Manda

 Jagruti Mahila Mandal

Sawali Mahila Mandal


List of Youths Organisation in Aurangabad  District

Sr. No.

Name of organisation .

Address

Aurangabad City

1

Amar Jyoti Club ,

Anguri Baugh

 Aurangabad

2

Aurangabad Brahaman  Yuvak

Kotwalpura

   Mandal

Aurangabad.

3

Aurangabad Mitra Mandal.

C/O Md. Yousuf

Buddhi Lane

Aurangabad .

4

Bhausing pura Yuvak Mandal

Bhausing pura

Aurangabad

5

Dalit Yuvak Aghadi.

760 , Pension Pura

Aurangabad.

6

Friends Club

Nas galli

Aurangabad.

7

Gopal Samaj Nav Yuvak

38/39 , Arihant

Mandal.

Nagar Sindhi

Colony

Aurangabad.

8

Hans Club

C/O , Yousuf

N.Karim Buddi

lane Aurangabad.

9

Janta Club

C/O Dadu Khan

Qilla Ark ,

Aurangabad.

10

Janta Mitra Mandal .

Sille Khana

Aurangabad.

11

Kokan Mitra Mandal .

C/O Dashreth

Marathawad Vibhag.

Raje , 67 Eknath

Nagar ,

Aurangabad.

12

Marathwada Apang Mitra

Nagsen Coop.

Mandal.

Housing Socy .

Jinsi A'bad

13

Mitra Sadhana Mandal .

C/o Bhise Nandlal

Bldg ,Nawab

pura, A'bad.

14

Modern Youth Club

Sarsawati Colony

A'bad.

15

Nav Tarun Mandal .

C/o Parlikar Juna

Bazar , A'bad .

16

New Mitra Mandal .

C/o Deoram

Nagre Nageshwar

wadi , A'bad .

17

Officers Club .

Commissioner's

office , A'bad.

18

Priti  Club .

New Monda

19

Rajesh Club

Gokul Nath

Mohella A'bad

20

Renuka Mitra Mandal .

Pan Dariba ,

A'bad.

21

Santosh Mitra Mandal .

C/o Jagardhane

Rangar Galli ,

A'bad .

22

Shri Ganesh Club A'bad

C/o Shankar lal

Babulal ,

Jafargate , A'bad .

23

Siddhanth Mitra Mandal

C/o Wagh mare

Eknath Nagar ,

A'bad.

24

Star Club

Sille Khana ,

 A' bad .

25

The Royal Club .

C/o  Suptd Post

office H.O.P .

A'bad .

26

Vikram   Barble  Club .

Panchakki  Road

 A'bad.

27

World Youth  Organisation .

291, Eknath

Nagar  A'bad .

28

Lokmanya  Tilak Tarun Mandal

15/c Sarsawati

Colony , A'bad.

29

Shivneri Kirida Mandal .

N-9-35 - 4

Dnyaneshwar

Nagar CIDCO,

A'bad

30

Marathwada Yuvak Mandal.

Pandariba

31

Rashtra Mata Yuvak Kirida

DRT . Wishwas

Mandal

Nagar A'bad .

32

Tilak Kirida Mandal .

Sille  Khana .

33

Bapu Magar Yuvak Mandal .

Bapunagar

Khokadpura.

34

 Ajantha  Kirida Mandal.

Khara  Kuvan.

35

Saungi Yuvak Mandal .

Saungi A'bad.

36

Jansava Mitra Mandal.

Ganash Bhavan

Anguri Bagh

A'bad.

37

Sajay Gandhi Yuvak Kirida

Juna    Bazar

Mandal

A'bad .

38

Rajputh Bhamta  Yuvak Sang

Aurangabad.

39

Tarun  Mitra Mandal .

CIDCO N.9 127/2

40

Rokdiya Hanuman yuvak

Hanuman Colony

Mandal

A'bad.

41

Shri Shivaji Yuvak Mandal .

Aurangabad .

42

Janjagruth  Yuvak Mandal .

Daulthabad .

43

Adarsh  Natya  Mandal .

Kanchanwadi ,

A'bad .

44

Nav  Yuvak Sangatna

Satara , A'bad .

45

Dongar  Kinhi  Yuvak  Kalyan ,

N-22/06 , CIDCO ,

Kirida wa Shickshan  Prasarak

11vi  Yougna ,

, Mandal .

Garkhada Parisar

, Shivaji Nagar ,

A'bad .

Sillod Taluka

46

Jay Kishan  Yuvak Mandal .

Kaygaon .

47

Rameshwar  Gramin Yuvak

Bhalgaon .

Mandal .

48

Pragya Yuvak Mandal .

Sillod  .

49

Nav Tarun Mandal .

W- Bazar.

50

Gramin Vikas Yuvak  Mandal .

Vadsi .

51

Nav Tarun  Yuvak Mandal .

Kasod .

52

Ganesh Tarun  Yuvak  Mandal.

Shavti  Khurd ,

53

Gramin Yuvak Mandal .

Jalgaon .

Paithan Taluka

54

Vijay Yuvak Mandal .

Lohgaon .

55

Chahtrapati  Yuvak Mandal

Paithan  .

56

Hanuman Yuvak Mandal .

Tharegaon .

57

Natagi Subash Yuvak Mandal .

Bidkin .

58

Jhunjar  Yuvak Mandal .

Mamachowk

Soegaon Taluka

59

Balaji Nav Yuvak Mandal .

Jarandi .

60

Yuvak Mandal .

Banuti .

Kannad Taluka

61

Ganesh  Sanskrutik Mandal .

Sakar Karkhana

Kannad.

62

Hanuman Sanskurtik Vikas

Chapaner .

Mandal .

63

Nav Tarun  Yuvak Mandal .

Bahirgaon .

64

Mahera  Yuvak Mandal .

Mahera .

Khuldabad Taluka

65

Davgiri Yuvak Mandal .

Madiwada .

66

Adarsh Yuvak Mandal .

Verud

67

Madiwada Yuvak Mandal.

Madiwada .

68

Kaylash Trust .

Verud.

69

Jagdamba Yuvak Mandal .

Galleborgaon .

70

Sanghmitra Mahila n Mandal.

Galleborgaon .


Mutual Aid and Resource Groups (MARGs)

There are various MARGs set up in the various industrial areas of Aurangabad district, principaly Chikalthana, Waluj and Aurangabad.

The objective of setting up MARGs in these areas are

·         Make the industrial zone self-sufficient

·         Encourage pooling of resources to tackle industrial accidents

·         Manage both on-site and off-site industrial accidents

·         Provide for a degree of expertise in managing disasters

·         Reduce the response time for managing disasters

·         To integrate the on-site plan of industries with an off-site plan.

·         Assist the district administration in managing disasters

Guidelines for the formation of MARGs are given in Annexure I.

Community Emergency Response Teams (CERTs)

In most disasters, community members are the first to respond before any outside assistance can reach the disaster site. Therefore in certain disaster prone areas a group of young volunteers or Community Emergency Response Teams are being formed and trained to undertake essential tasks which would reduce loss of life and property and at the same time build  confidence in self-management. Essentially CERTs would contribute in the following areas:

1.     Organising  training and preparedness exercises at the community level

2.     Ensuring family preparedness on the receipt of warning

3.     Ensuring communication links both within the community and with administration

4.     Controlling rumours and panic behaviour and undertaking confidence building activities

5.     Mobilising youth and able-bodied persons from the community to provide volunteers support, wherever required

6.     Organising local work teams for immediate rescue, and relief e.g. cooked food, first aid, assistance in law and order

7.     Assisting the handicapped who need special help

8.     Facilitating movement of relief teams during evacuation and relief and ensuring appropriate tagging as and when necessary

9.     Guarding major installations and evacuated properties till the administration takes over.

These CERTs  are expected to support the efforts of the Gram Panchayat and Tahsildar.

Villages where CERTs can be formed

Although Aurangabad  district does not have a serious flood problem,  there are many flood prone villages along the major rivers and in almost all the tahsils – the list is given in Section III. Such “Community Emergency Response Teams” need to be formed in these flood prone villages. In this direction an effort has been made by identifying rural growth centres where the population is large and the villages have central location from the point of view of market and educational facilities. In these villages respectable villagers who have influence and are the members of the local Peace Committe would be the ideal members of CERTs.

Areas of Community Participation

Administration and NGOs at the disaster site should ensure  maximum  community participation in all stages of operation in order to maintain community morale and confidence, maximise the use of local resources, reduce costs of operation and promote a faster recovery. It is important to note that the so-called “victims” are not all that helpless and offer a tremendous manpower resource and ingenuity to overcome the crises. Disaster management situations offers a wide range of choice and demands a immediate decision making. The participation of communities and their representatives would reduce the pressures on administration with regard to the choice and uncertainties of community’s response to the decision-making process.

Based on local dynamics, ethos and the experience of the Latur earthquake, an appropriate strategy to ensure community support has been evolved. Such efforts to enlist community support and participation have gone a long way in reassuring the community about the administration’s intent and seriousness about managing the disaster.

Efforts to enlist community participation is being ensured by

v      identifying situational, opinion and position leaders in the community and voicing administration’s confidence in their capabilities to undertake the tasks.

v      Consultations and dialogues expressly indicating the need for assistance would encourage the community and its leaders to come forward.

v      Regular feedback meetings and an open book approach to demonstrate  transparency.

v      Involving community  in decision making at local levels

The major areas of community participation are being identified and include the following :

During Evacuation

For appropriate security and law and order evacuation would be undertaken with assistance from community leaders and community based organisations (CBOs).

The entire family would evacuate together as a unit. However, to avoid stampede and confusion and in cases of inadequate transport or limited time, emergency evacuation would be undertaken in the following order :

·         seriously injured and sick   

·         children,  women and handicapped

·         Old

·         Able-bodied

For emergency evacuations , the families would be encouraged to take along water, food, clothing and emergency supplies to last at least three days. 

In addition, the families would be encouraged to assemble the following kit.  

·         Adeqaute supply of water in  closed, unbreakable containers.

·         Adequate supply of non-perishable packaged  food and dry rations

·         A change of clothing and rain gear.

·         Blankets and bedsheets, towels

·         Buckets, Plates and mugs made of plastic

·         Soap, toothbrushes, toothpaste

·         A battery-powered radio, torch, lantern, matches

·         Cash and jewellery

·         Personal medicines

·         A list of important family documents including ration card, passport, bank passbook address/telephone book (of relatives), certificates, driving licence, property documents, insurance documents etc.

·         Special items including foods, for infants, elderly or disabled family members.

People would be asked to shut off electricity and water at main switches and valves before leaving. 

People would be asked to listen to a battery-powered radio and follow local instructions.

In other cases, people would be advised to  follow these steps:

·         Wear protective clothing.

·         Secure their homes.  Close and lock doors and windows.

·         Turn off the main water valve and electricity

·         Leave early enough to avoid being trapped.

·         Follow recommended evacuation routes.  Not to  take shortcuts.  They may be blocked.

·         Not to move into flooded areas. 

·         Stay away from downed power lines.

·         Animals may not be allowed in public shelters. With respect to livestock, community would be instructed to set the livestock  free before evacuating in order to avoid extensive loss of livestock. If possible, the community may be advised to carry the livestock along if the evacuation does not involve transportation by vehicles.

During the Disaster

Community  leaders would be responsible for ensuring the following community behaviour :

·         People stay calm and panic behaviour is not encouraged. Regulate helter-skelter running or crowding of people.

·         Encourage people to stay at a secured place and protect themselves from injuries.

·         People do not enter  damaged buildings or  structures or even their own houses

·         People do not  touch electric poles, utility wires/cables

·         People do not use telephones except in life-threatening situations

·         Preparedness of community  for recurrence of the disaster, increase in severity, or consequential emergencies

·         Check for injuries.  Do not attempt to move seriously injured persons unless they are in immediate danger of death or further injury. 

·         Undertake first-aid activities as per the guidelines given in preparedness and mitigation document of DDMAP

·         Visually inspect utility lines and appliances for damage.

·         If water pipes are damaged, shut off the water supply at the main valve.

·         People stay away from damaged areas, unless their assistance has been specifically requested by police, fire or relief organizations.

·         Mobilise people to put out small fires and people inside are made to evacuate.

·         People do not throw away any damaged goods until an official inventory has been taken. 

·         Help  police, if requested,   to maintain law and order  and watch the evacuated property during the disaster



During Relief and Rehabilitation

Immediately after the disaster, the members of the community may look depressed and helpless, but very soon gets euphoric when they find that after all everything is not lost. Participation of community at this stage helps in early recovery and promotes mental health. It is necessary to see that member of the community are continuously engaged in some sort of helping activity to draw them out of their depression.

Relief authorities at the site would therefore:

·         Encourage self-help in every activity of their day-to-day living.

·         Encourage assistance for location and identification of dead, disposal of dead bodies, disposal of carcasses  and disposal of damaged food stocks

·         Encourage contribution of labour (loading, unloading, distribution, temporary constructions, salvage and restoration of water supplies, Food distribution, relief camps, cattle camps etc.)

·         Enlist assistance for  updating  records of damages and losses.

·         Enlist assistance in maintenance of  law and order

·         Enlist assistance in maintaining sanitation standards and disposal of waste

·         Promote cultural and recreational activities in order to protect the mental health and sustain the ethical and moral values.

Encouraging Family Level Preparedness

In order to assist the families to prepare themselves, community education programme will be undertaken to acquaint members of the community with the nature of each disaster, the type of damage that can occur, the demands it would generate both at family and community level and the manner in which it will be responded to. Even with the best of planning, it is difficult to assess the exact impact of the disaster and the response time. Under the circumstances then, families have to prepare themselves for a prolonged period before the administration can reach them. Although collective efforts of the community can reduce the hardship to some extent a large part of the burden would be on the family itself. Hence families would be encouraged to check for the in-house hazards as also use the given emergency checklist and prepare itself accordingl

Checking for in-house hazards

·        Encourage people to inspect their houses once every year to find and correct potential hazards such as any household items that can move, fall, break, or cause a fire.

·        Check for electrical hazards.

¨       Undertake repairs or replacement of hazardous cables, plugs, connections.

¨       Remove unwanted plug points or unused cables.

·        Check for combustible materials in the household

¨       Appropriateness of storage place (light, ventilation, heat and  reach of children)

¨       Appropriateness of containers  of flammable liquids such as kerosone/diesel (quality of material, quantity of material, covers, leakages)

¨       Precautions undertaken for managing the spills

·        Check for fire hazards.

¨       Separation of household goods from inflammable materials

¨       Separation of fuel from combustible materials

¨       Cleaning of valves, pressure stoves and supply points

Emergency Planning and Checklists

Families need to prepare themselves for any kind of disaster.  This would require specific information about emergency water and food and a recommended checklist of emergency supplies which will enable the family to sustain itself till adequate facilities for relief are organised.

Emergency checklist:

·         Find out which disasters could occur in the  area.

·         Ask how to prepare for each disaster.

·         Know the members of the CERT

·         Ask how warnings are given in an emergency.

·         Learn about the community's evacuation routes.

·         Learn about designated shelters

·         Ask about special assistance for elderly or disabled persons.

·         Learn about emergency plans at the workplace.

·         Learn about emergency plans for the  children’s school or day-care center.

Create an emergency plan:

·         Meet with household members. Discuss with children the dangers of  fire, severe weather, earthquakes and other emergencies.

·         Discuss how to respond to each disaster that could occur.

·         Talk to children about the likely disasters

·         It is easier for children to understand what is happening during a disaster if they already know what can take place. Point out that some of the disasters are indeed natural events and although they are dangerous, they do not have to be life-threatening if adequate precautions are taken. Try not to alarm the children in discussing possible disasters.

·         Teach children about the safety precautions for each disaster.

·         Learn how to turn off the water and electricity at main switches.

·         Create a network of relatives, friends or co-workers to assist the disabled in an emergency.

·         Provide for medical alert tags or bracelets to identify the handicapped person

Disaster supplies kit

·        For emergency evacuations , the families should be encouraged to take along adequate supply of water, food, clothing and emergency supplies. 

·        The families should be encouraged to assemble the  disaster supplies kit as described earlier.  

Evacuation Preparedness

When community evacuations become necessary, local officials would provide information to the public through the media.  Government agencies, and other disaster relief organisations would provide emergency shelter and supplies. 

The amount of time the families  have to evacuate will depend on the disaster.  If the event can be monitored, like a cyclone, families could have a day or two to get ready. But many disasters offer no time for people to gather even the most basic necessities.  This is why evacuation plan is necessary.

The checklist for emergency planning given above would be useful for evacuation planning as well.  Additionally, families should also get their disaster supplies kit organised for evacuation and follow the steps for evacuation as outlined earlier.

Shelter

Taking shelter is critical in times of disaster.  This may mean staying in an enclosed structure during a severe storm without electricity for days.

In many emergencies, local authorities would set up public shelters in schools, municipal buildings and places of worship.  While they often provide water, food, medicine and basic sanitary facilities, families should plan to have their own supplies as well. 

 Living in Designated Emergency Shelters

1.       Stay in the shelter until local authorities say it's okay to leave.  The length of the stay can range from a few hours to few days.

2.       Restrict smoking to well-ventilated areas.  Ensure that smoking materials are disposed of safely.

3.       Cooperate with local authorities  and others staying in the shelter.  Living with many families  in a confined space can be difficult and unpleasant.

4.       Listen to  radio broadcasts.

5.       Watch for fires.

6.       Assist local authorities as volunteers in the management of water, cooked food and other relief supplies including medical care, if required

7.       Make arrangements for pets and cattle before going to a public shelter.  They  are not allowed in a public shelter due to health reasons.

8.       Organise recreation for children

9.       Assist local  authorities with the assistance of  community members to maintain law and order

Helping  after Disaster

When disaster strikes, people everywhere want to help those in need. To  ensure that this compassion and generosity are put to good use, the media can highlight these facts:

·        Financial aid is an immediate need of disaster victims. Financial contributions should be made through local administration or a well-known voluntary organisation to help ensure that contributions are put to their intended use.

·        Before donating food or clothing, wait for instructions from local officials. Immediately after a disaster, relief workers usually don't have time or facilities to set-up distribution channels, and too often these items go to waste.

·        Volunteers should go through a well-known voluntary agency since these agencies will know what is needed and are prepared to deal with the need. Local authorities also coordinate volunteer efforts for helping in disasters.

·        Organisations and community groups wishing to donate items should first contact local officials, and voluntary agencies working on relief to find out what is needed and where to send it. Be prepared to deliver the items to different places, tell officials when you'll be there, but do not expect them to provide for  transportation, driver, and unloading.

Disaster Specific Family Preparedness Measures

Fires

[In addition to what has been listed under family preparedness as a generic response, fire accidents demand specific preparedness and responses. Given below are the preparedness measures and responses which are  specific to fire accidents].

Fire spreads quickly; there is no time to grab valuables or inform administration. Heat and smoke are even more dangerous than the flames; inhaling the super-hot air can sear the lungs.  Fire produces poisonous gases that make you disoriented and drowsy.  Instead of being awakened by a fire, it may induce a deeper sleep.

In case of fire know what to do, how to escape, how to safeguard the occupants. Have a plan.

Fire safety tips

·        Teach family members to stay low to the floor (where the air is safer in a fire) when escaping from a fire.

What to do during a fire

·        Use water to put out small fires.  Do not try to put out a fire that is getting out of control. Call the fire department. Make sure everyone knows how to call the fire department.

·        Never use water on an electrical fire. 

·        Smother oil and grease fires in the kitchen with baking soda or salt, or put a lid over the flame if it is burning in a pan.

·        If the clothes catch on fire, the person should stop, drop and roll until the fire is extinguished.  Running only makes the fire burn faster. Those assisting should pour water and not try to control it with bare hands.

·        Feel for heat near the top of the door before opening. If it's hot, don't open it unless it is an escape route. In such a case Feel the bottom of the door with the palm of your hand before opening it. If the door is cool, leave immediately.  Be prepared to crawl.  Smoke and heat rise, and the air is clearer and cooler near the floor.  If the door is hot, escape through a window. If escape is not possible, signal and call out for help, alerting the fire fighters.

·        Close doors of the rooms on fire. It will hold back the fire and keep out poisonous smoke until help arrives.

·        If escape is not possible, stay near the floor, where the  air is better. If all doors are closed, open a window for air. If   possible, stuff wet rags around doors to hold back smoke and heat.

·        Stay out. Do not, for any reason, go back into a burning house. If  someone is missing, tell the fire fighters.

What to do after a fire

·         Do not enter a fire-damaged structureunless authorities say it is okay.

·         When entering a fire-damaged structure, look for signs of heat or smoke.

·         Have an electrician check your household wiring before the current is turned on. 

·         Beware of structural damage.  Roofs and floors may be weakened and need repair.

·         Keep records of all clean-up and repair costs. 

·         Do not throw away any damaged goods until an official inventory has been taken. 

·         In case of tenancy, contact the landlord. 

·         Secure personal belongings or move them to another location.

·         Discard food  and medicines that have been exposed to heat, smoke or soot.

·         Do not try to open a safe or strong box.  It can hold intense heat for several hours.  If the door is opened before the box has cooled, the entering air combined with the high internal temperature can cause the contents to burst into flames.

·         If the local administration say the structure is unsafe and must be vacated :

¨       Ask local police or CERT volunteers to watch the property

¨       Take jewellery, cash, and financial records and other important documents.

¨       After vacating, notify the new residential address to friends, relatives, police and fire departments, delivery services, employers, schools and the post office

Earthquakes

[In addition to what has been listed under family preparedness as a generic response, earthquakes demand specific preparedness and responses. Given below are the preparedness measures and responses which are  specific to earthquakes].

The actual movement of the ground in an earthquake is seldom the  direct cause of death and injury. Most casualties result from falling objects and debris. Earthquakes also may trigger landslides and  generate huge ocean waves, each of which can cause great damage. There    are many actions which can be taken to reduce the dangers.

Preparing for an Earthquake

·        Prepare a home Earthquake plan

·        Choose a safe place in every room - under a sturdy table or desk or against an inside wall where nothing can fall on you.

·        Practice drop, cover, and hold on at least twice a year. Drop  under a sturdy desk or table, hold on, and protect the eyes by pressing the face against the arm. If there is  no table or desk nearby, sit on the floor against an interior wall away from windows or tall furniture that could fall on you.

·        Teach children to drop, cover, and hold on  

During an Earthquake

·        Stay calm.

·        Inside, stand in a doorway or crouch under a desk or table, away from windows. Watch for falling objects. If  in bed, hold on and stay there, protecting the head  with a pillow. Drop, cover, and hold on

·        Outdoors, stand away from buildings, trees, telephone, and  electrical lines.

·        On the road, drive away from subways, flyovers and bridges. Stop in safe area. Stay in vehicle.

After an Earthquake

·        Check for injuries. Provide first aid.

·        Check for water, sewage breaks and for downed electrical lines and short-circuits. Turn off appropriate utilities. Look for and extinguish small fires. Eliminate fire hazards.

·        Check for  building damage and potential safety problems.

·        Clean up dangerous spills.

·        Turn on radio and listen for instructions from local authorities/police/fire brigade

·        Don't use the telephone except for emergencies.

·        Expect aftershocks. Each time you feel one, drop, cover, and hold on

Floods and Flash Floods

[In addition to what has been listed under family preparedness as a generic response, floods demand specific preparedness and responses. Given below are the preparedness measures and responses which are  specific to floods].

Floods are the most common and widespread of all natural hazards.  Some floods develop over a period of days, but flash floods can result in raging waters in just a few minutes.  Flash floods carry rocks, mud and other debris and can occur without any visible sign of rainfall.  Land slides are another danger created by flooding.

Before a Flood

·        Find out if the area is flood-prone from the local authorities.

·        Understand the flood levels and learn about the history of flooding in the community.

·        Learn flood warning signs and community alert signals and know the terms used to describe flooding.

During a Flood Watch

·        Listen to a battery-operated radio for the latest flood information. Fill buckets and other water containers with clean water in case water becomes contaminated.

·        Be aware of flash floods. Flash floods will rise faster and  cut off the escape routes. If there is any possibility of a flash flood occurring, move immediately to higher ground.  Do not wait for instructions to move.

·        Move valuable household possessions to the upper floors or to safe ground if time permits.

During a Flood

If Indoors:

·        Turn on battery-operated radio or television to get the latest emergency information.

·        Get your preassembled emergency supplies.

·        If told to leave, do so immediately.

If Outdoors:

·        Climb to high ground and stay there. Avoid walking through any floodwaters. If it is moving swiftly, even shallow water can sweep you off your feet.

·        Do not allow children to play in flood waters

If In A vehicle:

·        If  travelling towards a flooded area, turn around and go another way.

·        If the vehicle stalls, abandon it immediately on the side of the road and climb to higher ground. Many deaths have resulted from attempts to move stalled vehicles.

·        If trapped in a vehicle that is going under water, get out of the submerged vehicle by opening a window or door and swimming to safety.

 After a Flood

·        Flood dangers do not end when the water begins to recede. Listen to a radio or television and don't return home until authorities indicate it is safe to do so.

·        When entering buildings, use extreme caution.

·        Examine walls, floors, doors, and windows to make sure that the building is not in danger of collapsing.

·        Watch out for animals, especially poisonous snakes, that may have got into the house with the flood waters. Use a stick to poke through debris.

·        Watch for loose plaster and ceilings that could fall.

·        Throw away food that has come in contact with flood waters.

·        Remove water from the house to avoid structural damage.

Epidemics

[In addition to what has been listed under family preparedness as a generic response, epidemics  demand specific preparedness and responses. Given below are the preparedness measures and responses which are  specific to epidemics ].

Different epidemics will have different etymology and consequences. Water-borne, vector-borne or  viral epidemics will need different levels of preparedness and response. Some epidemics may have a quick onset whereas others may take a longer time to spread. The public health department is primarily concerned with issuing the epidemic warning and declaring the areas as epidemic prone.

After the warning

·        Understand the specific nature of the epidemic including the causation, nature of spread, symptoms  and medication

·        Understand the specific precautionary and preventive measures to be taken by the family members.

·        Ensure intake of safe water and food. Take extra measures to protect food stocks.

·        Receive all recommended vaccinations, inoculations and encourage the neighbours to help health authorities to prevent spread of epidemics

·        Avoid stockpiling preventive medicines at family level. This may create a severe shortage of essential drugs.

·        Take extra-care in disposal of family waste and also assist in community efforts in disposal of waste

·        Keep in constant touch with epidemic information and public health staff in the area

During the Epidemic

·        Report any symptoms to the health authorities immediately

·        Understand if there is a need for quarantine

·        Understand the nature of treatment and possible emergencies

·        Do not leave the epidemic area without a clearance from the health authorities

·        Report arrival of any guests from the epidemic area

·        Discourage relatives and friends from outside epidemic area to visit your areas

·        Understand the steps to be taken in the disposal of personnel belongings of the patient including disposal of excreta

·        Understand the procedure for disposal of the dead body of the epidemic victim

Road Accidents

[In addition to what has been listed under family preparedness as a generic response, road accidents  demand specific preparedness and responses. Given below are the preparedness measures and responses which are  specific to road accidents].

Road Accidents are a major killer and take place without any warning.  Accidents may involve passenger vehicles, goods vehicles, vehicles carrying hazardous and toxic materials. The damage therefore may involve injuries and deaths, chemical spills, fires or release of toxic gases.

On accident event (involving passenger vehicle)

Those at the accident site should follow the following priorities

·         Look for and rescue the injured or those trapped in the vehicles

·         Arrange for transport of the injured to the nearest medical care centre

·         Place the dead bodies on one side to avoid obstructions

·         Organise locally traffic control using the available manpower to avoid traffic jams

·         Discourage people from crowding near the accident spot

·         Discourage people from looting the goods from the accident vehicle

·         Arrange to inform the nearest traffic police post through passing vehicles on either side

On accident event (involving hazardous and toxic elements)

·        Do not go anywhere near the accident spot unless the hazardous and toxic elements are properly understood and  discourage others. The contents may explode or catch fire

·        Prevent people at the accident site from lighting of matches for cigarettes etc.

·        Discourage people from collecting the spills from the accident vehicle as the chemicals might be deceptive and lead to toxic exposure or explosions

·        Arrange to inform the nearest traffic police/fire brigade through passing vehicles

·        Identify the wind direction and move in the opposite direction

·        Do not allow any traffic congestion near the accident spot

·        Stop the traffic at a sufficient distance (at least half a kilometre) from the accident spot in all directions till the nature of chemicals is properly understood

Dissemination of DDMAP

In order for the DDMAP to be effective it would be disseminated at two levels ;

·         to the district authorities, government departments, NGOs and other  agencies and institutions within the district and

·         to general public.

Effective dissemination of plan requires a well designed and focused training  and awareness programmes. The responsibility for dissemination of the plan is  vested with the District Disaster Manager,  at the Collectorate, and training activities will be carried out under the guidance and direction of  YASHADA, as well as through awareness programmes organised by each of the agencies participating in disaster management such as Irrigation Department organising warning and evacuation exercises or Fire Brigade demonstrating rescue operations. The District Disaster Manager would also involve NGOs in preparing suitable public awareness material to be distributed to the public. The specific NGOs to be involved in these exercises are given below.

List of NGOs to be involved in Plan Dissemination

 

Sr.

Name of the Organisation

Address

Telephone

 

No

No.

 

1

Lions Club of Aurangabad (Chief )

Bajrang Chowk

482153

 

482973

 

2

Lions Club of Aurangabad (Centre)

Chintamani Colony

331854

 

3

Lions Club of Aurangabad Midtown

Opp.Gadiya Park

332852

 

332851

 

4

Lions Club of Aurangabad Chikalthana

N-3, CIDCO

482564

 

482034

 

5

Lions Club of Aurangabad CIDCO

N-4, CIDCO

486492

 

332136

 

6

Lions Club of Aurangabad Waluj

Bhagwati Colony

333631

 

333715

 

7

Leo Club of Chilkalthana (Junior)

 --

 --

 

8

Leo Club of Chikalthana (Senior)

 --

 --

 

9

Rotract Club of Aurangabad

5,Trimurthy Complex Jawahar

 --

 

Colony

 

10

Rotract Club of Aurangabad (West)

New osmanpura Near Police

 --

 

Station

 

11

Rotract Club of Aurangabad (Main)

C/o Wami Rekha 45, Saraong

 --

 

Society,

 

12

Rotract Clubof Aurangabad (Midtown)

C/o Vishwas Ajit Osmanpura

331652

 

13

Rotract Club of Aurangabad (New Town)

C/o Makrawd Paithankar

 --

 

14

Rotract Club  of Aurangabad(Main)

C/o Dr. Borker R.A. Bhakti

 --

 

Nagar, CIDCO.

 

15

Rotary Club of Aurangabad (Main)

C/o Deodat Palnitkar Shriphal

332475

 

Bhagya Nagar

 

16

Rotary Club of Aurangabad (East)

Osmanpura

23131

 

335567

 

17

Rotary Club of Aurangabad (Central)

 --

 

18

Rotary Club of Aurangabad (Midtown)

C/o, jaggan nath Mandlik,

337795(o)

 

Shray Nagar.

337590(R)

 

19

Indian Development Foundation

C/o S.T. Sonavare Kutwalpura

 

20

Gaints Group of Aurangabad

Bansilal Nagar.

331788(O)

 

339199(R)

 

21

Gaints Group of Aurangabad (Chilkathana)

C/o Shri Mohan Kothari.

485671 (O)

 

485659(R)

 

22

Gaints Group of Aurangabad (Waluj)

C/o Shri Jugal Kishore

564145(O)

 

 Bansilal Nagar.

334365(R)

 

23

Janarath

19, Samadhan Colony Near

323479

 

Dist Court.

 

24

Manav Vikas Prakalp

C/o Shri Ankush Bhalekar

337281

 

Adalat Road.

 

25

Priya darshan Bhau Uddeshi Sanstha

236, New Eknath nagar

 -

 

Osmanpura.

 

26

Apang Niradhar Vikas Samiti

C/o Shri Ramesh Dhabade

 -

 

Millcorner A'bad.

 

27

Arogya Vayasan Mukut Kendra

Manudya, 17, Ranjit Nagar

 

A'bad

 

28

Bharti Kanti Dham

C/o A.V.Puranik Dixit Wada,

 

Nutun Colony, A'bad.

 

29

Bharti Kissan Sangh

Keshav krupa,47, Pannalal

329089

 

Nagar, A'bad.

 

30

Centre for Human Development

B-18,MIDC,Rly Stn. A'bad.

 

31

City Bus Wahtuk Welfare Committee

C/o Vasant Naryan Solunke

 

5-9 S.T. Quarter, A'bad.

 

32

Dashmesh Parivar

Mondha Naka A'bad.

 

33

Donar's Club

Arihant Nagar, A'bad.

326364

 

34

Foster Development

C/o Dr.Manvendra Kachode

 

Khokad pura, A'bad.

 

35

Health Vision Society

C/o Dr. Charekar Bldg.

 

Opp.L.I.C.Off. Adalat Road.

36

Hindu Urdu Society

C/o Wajahad Qureshi 3-11-101

Nizamuddin Road, A'bad.

37

Indian Development Foundation

C/o S.T.Sonavane

Kotwalpura, A'bad.

38

Lions Club of Aurangabad (Main)

Pandenivas,Chauraah.

39

Lokmiter Mandal

Raigaon Taluka Kannad.

40

Maharashtra Samaj Seva Mandal

C/o K.S. Narvade, Samrath

Naga, A'bad.

41

Manava Vikas Prakalp

C/o Ankush Bhalekar

Adalat Road, A'bad.s

42

Nath Agro Research Foundaion

C/o N.K. Gopal M.s Nath

Seeds Paith Road.

43

Sardar Jaisingh Cultural & Education

Osmanpura A'bad.

44

Sarva-to-Pari Seva Bihavi Sanatha

N-6, f/1-8, CIDCI, A'bad.

45

Sawali

Pranav, 12, Bhagya Nagar,

333620

Adalat Road, A'bad.

46

Sawal Niradhar Isteri Kalyan Sanstha.

C/o Kamal Vasant Muley.

Bhagya Nagar, A'bad

 -

47

The Marathwada Navjivan Mandal.

C/o Sudha Kaldate Samitra

Colony A'bad.




The training programmes will be organised for different levels of functionaries. The district level officials and identified NGOs, Private Sector organisations will receive the training at YASHADA under their Training of Trainers (TOT) programme in order to equip them to extend training facilities to functionaries at taluka and village level as well as organise simulation exercises within the community.  Some of the select government training institutions at the district level will participate in such TOTs and undertake training programmes for government functionaries. Efforts will be therefore directed to decentralise training activity to the extent possible so as to enable YASHADA to serve as resource centre and provide training expertise to various groups.

The materials for awareness programmes at community level would be prepared in the local language to ensure widespread dissemination. Media would be extensively used for public awareness programmes. These will include 

Þ     newspapers including local ones

Þ     TV

Þ     local cable networks

Þ     radio

Þ     folk media

Þ     publicity material

Schools, colleges and other public institutions would be specifically targetted.

In addition to dissemination of literature related to the DDMAP, disaster response drills should be conducted on a regular basis especially in the disaster prone areas to maintain the readiness of communities  and departments as regards  operational procedures, personnel and equipment and orderly response.

Local agencies such as fire, police and ambulance staff  would be familiar with the disasters possible in an area. Mutual aid organizations and public emergency response organizations would be included in these drills

The objectives of  full scale  drill include evaluation of  the following:

·         practicality of the plan (structure and organization)

·         adequacy of communications and interactions among agencies and the public

·         emergency equipment effectiveness

·         adequacy of first aid and rescue procedures

·         adequacy of emergency personnel response and training

·         public relations skills

·         evacuation and  count procedures

Plan Evaluation

The purpose of evaluation of  DDMAP is to determine

·         the adequacy of resources

·         coordination between various agencies

·         community participation

·         partnership with NGOs

The ease of understanding and using the plan will also be important considerations.

The plan will be updated when  shortcomings  are observed in

·         organizational structures

·         technological changes render information obsolete;

·         response mechanism following reports on drills or exercises;

·         assignments of state agencies.

Adaptation, improvisation and optimisation are corner stones of any planning pertaining to disasters. It must be emphasized that the Documents or Manuals prepared as  disaster management plan have a limited purpose. These can at best serve as reminder of tasks and activities.

Individuals and agencies assigned specific responsibilities within this Plan will prepare appropriate supporting plans and related standard operating procedures, periodically review and update alerting procedures and resource listings, and maintain an acceptable level of preparedness.

The DDMAP would be evaluated by both  the district and the state.

Post-Disaster Evaluation

A post-incident evaluation would be done after the withdrawal of relief and rehabilitation activities in order to assess

·         the nature of state intervention and support, 

·         suitability of the organization structure,

·         institutional arrangements,

·         adequacy of Operating Procedures,

·         monitoring mechanisms,

·         information tools,

·         equipment,

·         communication system, etc.,

The  impact studies on the above  operations for long-term preventive and mitigation efforts are also to be undertaken.

At the community level, evaluation exercises may be undertaken to assess the reactions of the community members at various stages in the disaster management cycle and to understand their perceptions about disaster response in terms of 

·         adequacy of training,

·         alert and warning systems,

·         control room functions,

·         communication plans,

·         security,

·         containment

·         recovery procedures,

·         monitoring

Plan Update

The DDMAP is a “living document” and the Collector  along with YASHADA will update it every year taking into consideration

·         the resource requirements,

·         updates on human resources

·         technology to be used

·         coordination issues

An annual conference for DMAP update will be organised by the Collector. All concerned  departments and agencies would participate and give recommendations on specific issues.

The following  guidelines would be adhered to while updating the DDMAP :

·         A procedure, would be in place to update the plan on a regular basis to ensure that  the items requiring updation are considered and are current.

·         When an amendment is made to a plan, the amendment date would be noted on the updated page of the plan.

·         A senior  official in every  agency  would be designated to ensure that all plan-holders are notified of changes as soon as possible.  Plan-holders would be requested to verify that they have received the changes.

Annexure I: Guidelines for Formation of MARG

In areas where there is a concentration of  hazardous industries,  Mutual Aid and Response Groups can be organised to make the industrial zone to be self-sufficient to a fairly large extent and manage industrial accidents, both on-site and off-site.

The pre-requisite for setting up such a group are

1.       General information on industries, settlements and geo-physical and climatic data

2.       Zoning of the Industrial area with listing of industries in each zone

3.       Identification of lead industry and the group leader and assistant group leaders with their names, addresses and telephones, who would act as liaison persons

4.       Identification of technical experts in each zone with their names and addresses who would respond to the call for assistance

5.       Identification of potential hazards/toxic materials with the list containing physical and hazardous properties, procedures for responding  spillage and leakage, cautions to be taken including emergency procedures, naturalisation procedures, protective equipments, emergency equipments, first-aid.

6.       List of hazardous chemicals and quantities stored by different industries

7.       Names, locations and telephone numbers of hospitals and poison centres

Guidelines For Seeking MARG Assistance

Preparation :

1.       All concerned industries should prepare an Onsite Emergency Control plan with following information.

·        Risk Analysis.

·        Safety and Environmental Audit

·        Worst case scenario.

·        List of inventories.

·        Hazard Identification

·        Material safety data sheets

·        Plant layout with escape routes

·        Demographic and geographic situation.

·        Location of Fire hydrants

·        Distances between the processes and facilities in plant and in immediate vicinity of plant be logged and determined in terms of time and distance.

·        Evacuation procedure

·        Emergency control organisation structure

·        Responsible personnel list with addresses and telephone numbers.

·        Available emergency control facilities.

2.       An effort has to be made to dovetail Onsite plan to Off-Site plan.

3.       Such plan should be available in the designated Emergency Control Centre of the factory, Directorate of Industrial  Safety and Health, Fire Brigade, Police, District/Corporation Officials and Collector and should be updated periodically.

4.       Training sessions and mock drills in First Aid, Fire Fighting, Evacuation,  First Responder.  Regular testing of plants processes should be conducted to appraise and train different levels of employees in emergency control.

During An Emergency :

1.       During an emergency, assistance should be sought from the immediate neighbouring MARG Member/s enlisted zonewise having appropriate expertise as per the guidelines and equipments, gadgets for controlling situation and Statutory Authorities simultaneously.

2.       All the personnel in each factory who are responders for emergency must be made aware about the availability of such MARG assistance and methods of getting it.

3.       Assisting organisation must be properly briefed by the unit seeking the assistance about the nature of emergency, materials involved and meteorology conditions (Wind direction), precise nature of help required to ensure proper response.

4.       Assistance can be requested in the form of either equipment or expertise or both with expert operating personnel.

5.       In case of equipment received from assisting organisation

·        It must be properly used

·        Returned promptly

·        In case of damage it should be repaired from approved agency and returned in working condition.

·        Consumables should be replaced/reimbursed.

6.       When a MARG member is extending help to Non-MARG member or other organisation make sure that

·        Appropriate equipment tested for the purpose is given.

·        If your personnel are attending the emergencies ensure that they are well-versed and have worked under such a situation and are able to give guidance.

·        The situation and the materials involved are being briefed to you correctly.

·        The guidance about plants, processes and materials involved is available on the spot from the organisation receiving the assistance

7.       It is understood that in case of any accident to any personnel while assisting, organisation that is receiving help extend its co-operation in bearing a reasonable part of expenses, beyond that covered by an insurance policy

8.       Following sequence of action is recommended while seeking help

·        First Deploy internal resources.

·        Inform civic Fire Brigade and get their assistance.  Inform the Statutory Authorities, keep appropriate MARG member in your zone/neighbourhood alerted about the emergency.

·        If found necessary request help from the MARG member to control specific situation for which it has got equipment and expertise.

·        Convey clearly what you want, expertise, equipment or both and exact nature of need.

·        Keep other MARG member in your zone alerted to render any further assistance, if the situation so demands.

General :

·        Each organisation is primarily responsible for keeping its plants in safe conditions, identifying, assessing, minimising and eliminating hazards and risk, maintaining necessary equipment for special kinds of risks that the organisation might be facing and training its personnel for emergency response and control.

·        It may seek help from others in the MARG by way of equipment, expertise and special materials, but this is only complementary to its own arrangements and commitment to safety and emergency control.

·        Mutual Aid and Response is sought only when your own efforts seems to be inadequate to meet the demand of the situation and that of civic response group is either not adequate or enough.

INVENTORY OF RESOURCES

Government Sector

DIRECTORY OF OFFICIALS 

1.  Revenue Department .

Sr.

Designation

        Phone    Nos .

No.

Office

Residence

1

Divisional Commissioner , A'bad

331294

331221

334501-3   PBX

Ext  .   201

2

Addl . Commr . A'bad .

334501-3   PBX

331197

Ext .     232

3

Asstt . Commr . (Revenue )

353562

334351 (R)

Ext .    216

4

Asstt . Commr . ( Gen)

Ext . 241

5

Asstt . Commr . (Dev )

330902

334743

6

Asstt . Commr . (Supply )

352850

334852 (R)

7

O S D   (EGS )

331472

  Ext . 260

8

OSD ( Planning )

334487

Ext . 217

9

Collector

331200 (P)

331100

334501-03 PBX

Ext . 222

10

Additional Collector

334256

486369

11

Residence Dy. Collector

334127

333300

Ext . 246

12

Dist.  Supply Office .

Ext . 214

331128

13

 Asst.Dist.  Supply Office .

Ext .

 -

14

Dist . Planning Officer .

334285

331721

15

Dy . Collector ( EGS )

Ext .

 -

16

Spl . Land Acquisition

Ext .

 -

( Coordinator )

17

Reception Office .

Ext : 243

334800

18

Head Clerk  ( Incharge of G .B )

Ext : 207

 -

19

Revenue Assistant

Ext :

 -


Sr.

Designation

        Phone    Nos .

No.

Office

Residence

SUB-DIVISIONAL OFFICERS

334501/3

20

 S .D .O.  A'bad .

Ext : 247

21

 S.D.O.  Vaijapur

22062

22096

22

 S.D.O.  Sillod

22172

22080

TAHSILDARS

23

Tahsildar   A'bad.

334728

323495

24

 ---"----  Paithan

23051

23003

25

 ---"----  Gangapur

21336

21404

26

 ---"----  Khuldabad .

41023

41034

27

 ---"----  Kannad .

21024

21066

28

 ---"---- Vaijapur .

22066

22196

29

 ---"---- Sillod .

22029

21060

30

 ---"----  Soegaon .

4323

 -

 Rural Development  Department .

Sr.

Designation .

                                 Telephone Nos .

No.

Office

Residence

1

C .E . O .   Zilla Parishad

331291

331292

2

Dy. C .E .O. (General )

331571

332529

3

Dy. C .E .O . (V. panchayats )

331575

4

Chief Account & Finance Office

331573

5

Education Office (primary )

331571

331175

6

Education Office (Secondary )

331571

331205

7

Ex. Engr . ( works )

331572

8

Ex. Engr . ( Irrigation )

33

9

Social welfare Office

331576

350744

10

Health Office

BLOCK DEVELOPMENT OFFICERS

12

B.D.O. Aurangabad.

334112

331184

13

B.D.O. Paithan

23026

14

B.D.O. Khuldabad

41025

41056

15

B.D.O. Kannad

21028

16

B.D.O. Vaijapur

22070

17

B.D.O. Sillod

22040

18

B.D.O. Gangapur

21328

19

B.D.O. Soegaon

4306

 HEALTH DEPARTMENT

Sr.

Designation

        Phone    Nos .

No.

Office

Residence

1

Civil Surgeon

331019

331216

2

 Govt.Medical College Hospital

334411/17 (pbx)

3

 Superintendent M.G.M

334411

 -

4

.Dy.Director Health Services

331357

331356

5

 Dean Medical College Hospital

331296

331367

6

 Govt.Dispensary Shahganj

334301

7

 Maleria Medical Officer

334396

8

Medical Officer,Health centre paithan

23037

9

Med.Officer, C.H.kannad

10

Med.Officer,C.H.Khuldabad

11

Med.Officer,C.H.Vaijapur

22116

12

Med.Officer,C.H.Gangapur

13

Med.Officer,C.H.Sillod

20046

14

Med.Officer,C.H.Soegaon


Maharashtra Jeevan Pradhikaran

Sr.

Designation

         Phone Numbers

No.

Office

Residence

1

Chief Engineer Aurangabad

 --

2

Superintending Engineer.

322238

33101

3

Executive Engr.Mechanical

4

Executive Engr.Works

331337

484803

Division A'bad No.1

 

5

Executive Engr.Works

Division A'bad No.2

331202

481696

6

Executive Engr.Project

Division A'bad

7

Sub-Divisional Officer

Works Sub-Division No.(1)

353799

Aurangabad

8

   "    "  Sub-Dn.No.(5)

334398

9

   "    "  Sub-Dn.No.(6)

334752

10

   "    "  Sub-Dn.No.(7)

11

   "    "  Sub-Dn.No.(8)

334398

12

Dy.Engineer Sub-Division

Sillod

22116

13

     "       "      Vaijapur

32555

14

     "       "      Kannad

21098

15

     "       "      Soegaon


Public Works Department

Sr.

         Phone Numbers

No.

Designation

Office

Residence

1

Chief Engineer Aurangabad

331616

33119

331815

2

Superintending Engr.A'bad

331022

331148

3

Ex.Engr.Works Divn.

331174

33114

4

Ex.Engr.Works Divn. (W)

331288

334485

5

Dy.Engr. North Sub-Divn

331178

6

Dy.Engr. South  Sub-Divn

331093

7

Dy.Engr.Sub-Dn.No.(1)

334017

8

Dy.Engr.Sub-Dn.No.(2)

331519

     Taluka Offices

9

Dy.Engr.,Sub-Divn.Paithan

23016

10

Dy.Engr.,Sub-Divn.Khuldabad

11

Dy.Engr.,Sub-Divn.Kannad

21498

12

Dy.Engr.,Sub-Divn.Vaijapur

32555

13

Dy.Engr.,Sub-Divn.Gangapur

41024

14

Dy.Engr.,Sub-Divn.Sillod

22569

15

Dy.Engr.,Sub-Divn.Soegaon


Maharashtra State Electricity Board.

 Phone    Numbers

 

Sr.No.

Designation

 

Office

Residence

 

1

Chief Engineer, A'bad Zone

 

2

Superintending Engr.A'bad

331087(p)

 

331567 (o)

 

3

Ex.Engr.(o&m) Urban Dn.

331365(p)

 

 

334165(o)

 

4

   "    "     "       Rural Dn

334488

485205

 

5

   "    "  EHV/O & M Dn.

334280

485167

 

6

   "    "  (O & M) Kannad

334280

 

7

   ''    '' O.& M Dn Kanna

21133

 

8

 Dy.Ex.Engr.Urban Sub  Division  I  A' bad

485064

488487

 

9

 Dy.Ex.Engr.Urban Sub Dn II A'bad

482580

 

 

10

 Dy.Ex. Engr Urban Sub Dn No.III A'bad

353700

485979

 

11

 Dy.Ex.Engr Urban Sub IV Containment

332981

-

 

12

 Asstt. Engr.(Rural) Sub Dn I A'bad

321217

-

 

13

 -----------do---------- (Rural) Sub Dn II

321217

-

 

14

 -----------do----------  Sub Dn G'pur

21410

-

 

15

 -----------do---------- Sub Dn K'bad

41044

-

 

16

 -----------do---------- Sub Dn Paithan

21410

-

 

17

 -----------do---------- Sub Dn Ajantha

 -

-

 

18

 -----------do---------- Sub Dn Kannad

21010

-

 

19

 -----------do---------- Sub Dn Siliod

220638

-

 

20

 -----------do---------- Sub Dn Vaijapur

22080

-

 


             Other  Government Offices

1

 Chief Administrator CIDCO

331370

2

 Regional office Polution Control Board A'bad

331998

3

 Joint Director Industrial Safety & Health A'bad

331326

4

Asstt. Commissioner Food & Drugs A'bad

331268

5

Dy.Director Geology & Mining

331508

Government Hospitals in Aurangabad

Sr.

Name

Location

Phone no.

1

Medical College Hospital

Panchakki Road,A'bad

PBX:334411/6 lines

2

Civil Hospital

Shivaji Maidan(Aam Khas)

331011

3

Durgaprasad Hospital 

Shahganj,Aurangabad

334301

4

Dental College Hospital

Panchakki Road,A'bad

331153

5

Police Hospital

Police Headquarters,A'bad

6

M.S.R.T.C Hospital

S.T Office A'bad

Medical Facilties at Taluka Headquarters

Sr. No.

Name of Institute

No. of

No. of

No. of

Doctors

Beds

Vehicles

1

Health Unit Paithan

4

30

2

2

Rural Hospital Pachod

3

30

1

3

Rural Hospital  Gangapur

3

30

1

4

Rural Hospital  Vaijapur

3

30

1

5

Rural Hospital  Khuldabad

3

30

1

6

Rural Hospital  Pishor

3

30

1

7

P.H.C. Kannad

2

10

1

8

Rural Hospital  Sillod

3

30

1

9

Rural Hospital  Soegaon

1

30

1

Private Sector

Educational Institutions in Aurangabad District

Sr.No.

Name of the institute

Phone

1

 Dr.Babasaheb Ambedkar Marathwada

334431

 Univercity

334435/40 PBX

2

 Govt Medical College Hospital

 334411/17

3

 Millind College of Arts. A'bad

337836

4

 ---------''--------- Science A'bad

334856

5

 S.B. College of Arts A'bad

332040

6

 ---------''--------- of Science A'bad

332192

7

 Dr.Ambedkar College A'bad

321280

8

 Vasantrao Nayak College A'bad

482321

9

 Govt. College of A'bad

331476

10

 Vivekanand College A'bad

337351

11

 Deogiri College A'bad

381102

12

 M. Azad College A'bad

332929

13

 A.M. College Paithan

23062

14

 Shivaji College Kannad

21042

15

 V.P.College Vaijapur

2086

16

 Sir Syed College A'bad

321285

17

 M.P. Law College A'bad

336621

18

 College for Women Navkhanda A'bad

332462

19

 Indra Bai Pathak Mahavidyalya

331848

20

 Babasaheb Ambedkar Arts College

324766

21

 Nutan Kala Maha Vidalaya A'bad

 -

22

 Pandit Jawahar lal Nerhu MahaVidyalaya

333320

23

 Yashyapak Arts College 

336648

24

 Adhayapak Maha Vidayalaya

 -

25

 Foster Development Adhayapak Mahavidya

-

26

 Govt. College of Education

334840

27

 -----------''-----------''------------------

334227

28

 Mahatma Phule College of Education

484143

29

 Marathwada College of Education  

37129

30

 Premchand Mugdaya College of Education

 -

31

 Savitri Bai College of Education

482415

32

 Sant Gadge Maharaj College of Education

482415

33

 Govt. Enginering College

334348

34

 Jawaharlal Nehru Enginering & Architecture College

482893

35

 M.G.M. Medical College Hospital

484406

36

 Kamla Nehru Pharmacy College

332878

37

 Physical Education College

331418

38

P.E.S. College of Physical Education

332489

39

 Ch.Shahaji Maharaj College of Physical

482415



Timber Merchants in Aurangabad District

 No.

Name

Address

Tel No.

1

Balaji Wooden Industries

Banjara Colony, Khokadpura , Aurangabad

320042

2

Bhagwati Timber Mart

No. 41/8/26 Mondh Road

332485

3

Bhagwati Ply & Timber

4-5-6 Arhat Market  Mondha Road, A'bad

338184

4

Bharat Timber Mart

Opp. Amarpreet Hotel Jalna Road, A'bad

332873

5

Captain Saw Mill

Mondha Road , Jafar Gate A'bad

329583

6

Ganesh Timber Mart

Samshan Maruti Road, Aurangabad

326653

7

ganesh Wooden Industries

Banjara Colony, Khokadpura ,

333687

8

Govind Saw Mill

Mondha Road Aurangabad

 --

9

Harsul Saw Mill

Mondha Road Aurangabad

337770

10

Jawahar Saw Mill

New Baijipura, Aurangabad

331658

11

Jawahar Saw Mill

Kranti Chowk, Aurangabad.

324845

12

Kailash Timber Industries

Samshan Maruti Road, Aurangabad

332719

13

Kabra Saw Mill

Samshan Maruti Road, Aurangabad

321195

14

Laxmi Saw Mill

Kranti Chowk, Aurangabad.

323408

15

Mahadev Saw Mill

Mondh Naka Jalna Road,

329368

16

Maharashtra Saw Mill

Near Tisgaon Pune Road, A'bad

554170

17

New Bharat Saw Mill

Samshan Maruti Road, Aurangabad

 --

18

New Shivb Timber Mart

Samshan Maruti Road, Aurangabad

26653

19

Omya Timbver Mart

Near Abhinay Cinema, Aurangabad

336657

20

Patel Saw Mill

Kranti Chowk, Aurangabad.

333267

21

Patel Saw Mill

Near Airport, Chikalthana, A'bad

482391

22

Patel Industries

Opp. API, CIDCO, Aurangabad

482044

23

Patel Timber Industries

Near Abhinay Cinema, Aurangabad

333391

24

Patel Timber Mart

MIDC, Chikalthana, Aurangabad

482195

25

Patidar Wooden Work

Kranti Chowk, Aurangabad.

333638

26

Shri. Sarswati Timber Mart

Mondha Road Aurangabad

337065

27

Shakti Timber Mart

Samshan Maruti Road, Aurangabad

333481

28

Shri. Shanker Vijay Saw Mill

Kranti Chowk, Aurangabad.

334659

29

Shanti Timber Industries

Samshan Maruti Road, Aurangabad

337055

30

Sharda Timber Mart

Samshan Maruti Road, Aurangabad

336484

31

Shri. Shiv Timber Mart

Mondha Road Aurangabad

336731

32

Shri. Durga Timber & Plywood

N-6, CIDCO, Aurangabad

482195

33

Shri. Ram Timber Mart

Opp. AIR Station, Aurangabad

334199

34

Siraj Saw Mill

Near Kali Baudi, Aurangabad

339157

35

Tayyaba Timber Mart

Near Kali Baudi, Aurangabad

321156

36

Shri Umya Timber Mart

Near Abhinay Cinema, Aurangabad

37

Vishnu Sawmill & Timber Mart

Ajab Nager, Kranti Chowk, A'bad

332797

38

Vijay laxmi Saw Mill

Waluj Road, Aurangabad

554413

39

Surya Saw Mill

Kranti Chowk, Aurangabad.

333011


List of Civil Work Contractors in Aurangabad District.

Sr.

Name

Address

Telephone

No.

1

Agrawal Construction Co.

Nirala Appartment Shilpa

331338

Nagar St.Road.

2

P.M.Choradya

10,Ahsinsa Nagar AIR Road

333717 (O)

335752 (R)

3

D.V.Engineers & Contractor

68,Pannalal Nagar.

331934

4

Deshmukh Villas

Yesh Shri Colony

 --

5

Patil U.P.

12,Sahakar Nagar.

3334748

6

Maula Alim Khan

Behind Gurudwara.

 --

7

Ozha Group of Engineers

Renjaionwar Colony CIDCO.

482978

8

Mohite M.N.

Sundernagar Nageshwadi.

338333

9

K.K.Construction

8,Apna Bazar Jalna Road.

24056 (O)

332545 (R)

10

S.P.G.Construction

50,Shrey Nagar.

335547

11

Sayojana Construction Co.

N-4,CIDCO.

483021


The list of wholesalers of seeds, fertilisers and pest control chemicals.

Fertilisers

Sr.

Name of the Agency

Address

Telephone

No.

1

Adarsh kurshi Seva Kendra

New Mondha

333510

2

Ashok Agencies

New Mondha

333168

3

Baba Agencies

Nawabpura Mondha

Road

4

Gukuldas Navander

Shahganj

5

Darakh Agencies

New Mondha

324577

6

Deepak Fertilisrs & Petro Chemicals.

CIDCO

483233

7

Maruti Fertilisers Chemicals Ltd.

Nutan Colony

332111(O)

336515 (R)

8

Sanjay Fertilisers

Jadhav Mandi

9

Maharashtra Coop Protection

New Mondha

337495/

372913

10

Pensh Agro inputs Markeeting

Pvt Ltd.

New Mondha

328242

11

M.R.Traders

Sindhi Colony

324519

12

S.M.Darak & Sons

Sarafa Road.

336789


Seeds producers & Distributors

Sr.

Name of the Agency

Address

Telephone

No.

1

Ajeet Seeds Pvt-Ltd.

2nd Floor Tapadiya

323016

Terrace Adalat Road

332572

2

Akash Seeds.

Kailash nagar Dada

Colony

3

Arya Seeds

Tapadiya Terrace Adalat

332066

Road

4

Amar Shaheed Beej

Nawabpura, Mondha Road

333302

Bhandar

5

Nath Seeds Ltd

Nath House

333363

333314

6

Pro-Agro Seeds Co.Ltd.

Plaza Town Centre, CIDCO

483323

484761

7

Krishna Agro Sales &

 Shahganj

329264

Services

328589

8

Vijay Beej Bhandar

New Mondha

333477

9

S.M.Darak & Sons

Sarafa Road

324789

10

Gokal Seeds

Jadhav mandi

333886

11

Meher Seeds Corporation

Nawab Pura

329130

12

Umesh Krushi Seva Centre

New Mondha

332565

13

Sangeeta Agencies

New Mondha

337574

14

Godavari Seeds Pvt Ltd.

New Mondha

320949


Pesticides

1

Ashok Pest Control

Rokadya Hanuman Colony

Services

2

Best Pest Control Services

Radha Appartments Khara

323235

Kunwa

3

Perfect Pest Control

Priya Dashmi Colony N-5

482758

G-33,CIDCO

334723

4

Pest Control (India) Ltd

21, Tilak Nagar

337192

5

Rukmani Pest Control

Shivshankar Colony

 -

6

Scientific Pest Control

Samrath nagar

 -

List of Private Bus Owners

Sr.

Name of Owner or Agency

Address

No.of

Telephone No.

No

buses

1

Punjab Tour's & Travels

Adalat Road

1

21431/26431

2

Shri Nath Tour's & Travels

Kranti Chowk

1

3

Diamond Tour's & Travels

Adalat Road

2

336040/338646

4

Ghatge & Patil Tour's & Travels

16, Shoping Centre Printravel

1

335096

5

Jet Travels

Adalat Road

4

3370806/330366

6

Jet Deluxe

Adalat Road

4

7

Royal Cars

Kranti Chowk

1

302067/335988

8

Seva Tour's & Travels

Samarth Nagar

1

9

Samrat Tour's & Travels

Tapadia Tarrace

6

10

Himalaya Tour's & Travels

Tapadia Tarrace

2

11

Travel Track

Jalna Road

2

12

Vibhuti Tour's & Travels

Adalat Road

4

13

Royal White House

Adalat Road

4

14

Humsafar Travels

Osmanpura

3

335957

15

Sangita Tour's & Travels

Adalat Road

2

16

India Tour's & Travels

Mill Corner

2

333052

17

Sai Sangam Travels

Adalat Road

9

18

Manmandir Travels

Tapaid Terrace Adalt Roat

19

Prasanna Travels

Bus stand Road

4

20

Jugnu Travels

Tapaid Terrace Adalt Roat

4

21

Jaideo Travels

Adalat Road

 -

22

Rajhans Travels

Kranti Chowk

4

23

CityLink Travels

Mill Corner

6

24

Sainee Travels

Adalat Road

6


List of Private Doctors with Speciality.

Sr.

Name & Qualification

Address

Telephone No.

No

Physician and Cardiologists

1

Dr. S.R. Bhatiea M.D.

Jalna Road

336431

334631

2

Dr.R.B.Bhagwat M.D.

Kamal Nain Bajaj Hospital

331448

331609

3

Dr.Bhide Sandhya M.D.

Dashmesh Nagar New

331697

Osmanpura

4

Dr.Anil Boralkar M.D.

Kranti Chowk

23454

20041

5

Dr.Raji Deshpande M.D.

Seva Hospital Sindhi Colony

334309

6

Dr.Santosh Deshpande M.D.

Aniket Hospital CIDCO

330306

7

Dr.S.P.Ekbote M.D.

Kamal Nain Bajaj Hospital

331448

482767

8

Dr.Sawji M.H. M.D.

Kamal Nain Bajaj Hospital

334133

9

Dr.Kikas Ratnal Parkar M.D.

331994

10

Dr.Rajarkar D.V.M.D.

Venkatesh Hospital

337994

11

Dr.Parwaz Qureshi M.D.

Roshangate

12

Dr.Kishor Pargaonkar M.D.

20,Pushpa Nagri

331862

331565

13

Dr.Kudre Murthy Shrikant

Khadkeshwar

332918

14

Dr.Jillan Parsi S. M.D.

Motiwala Nagar

337245

15

Dr.Jaiswal K.B. M.D.

Sawetri Colony Chelipura

Radiologist/Ultrosonologists

Sr.

Name

Address

Tel. No.

No.

1

Dr.P.A.Badjatya,M.D.

Ellora Diagnostic Centre,A'bad

2

Dr.Sunil Deshpande,M.D.

Kamalnain Bajaj Hospital,A'bad

          331448

3

Dr.V.T.Jadhav,M.D.

Trupati CT Scan,A'bad

320621

4

Dr.Ramesh Malani .,M.D.

Opp.M.S.E.B.Office,A'bad

338794

5

Dr.Lahoti Gokuldas,M.D.

Opp.St.Francis D'Sales H.S.

321149

Jalna Road,A'bad

6

Dr.Rajindra Kshirsagar

Dr.Hegdewar Hospital,A'bad

331994/

331995


Urologists / Nephrologists

1

Dr.Suhas Bavikar,M.D.

Samarth Nagar,A'bad

329019

2

Dr.S.S.Borkar,M.D.

Kamalnayan Bajaj Hosp.A'bad

331448

3

Dr.P.P.Pargaonkar,M.D.

Janki Hospital,Bhagyanagar

332745

4

Dr.P.T.Patel, M.D.

Trust  Hospitals

1

Dr.Hegdewar Hospital

Bhagya Nagar

331994/331995

2

Kamalnayan Bajaj

Adalat Road, A'bad

331448

3

Lion Hospital

N-1,CIDCO,A'bad

482032

4

Mahatma Gandhi

N-6, CIDCO

484406

Memorial Hospital

5

Marathwada Cancer Hospital

Chikakalthana

484192

6

Satya Vishnu Trust Hospital

Opp.Himayat Baugh

336353

7

Sumanjanjali Pratishtn

Khadkeshwar

336900


List of private Hospitals at the Taluka Places in Aurangabad District

Sr.No.

Name of incharge of

Hospital

No.of beds

No.of Doctor

Tq.Paithan

1

Dr.Chakurkar

10

2

2

Dr.Joshi

6

1

3

Dr.Bhosle

10

1

4

Dr.Mandhane

10

1

5

Dr.Sraf

10

1

6

Dr.Lehare

10

1

7

Dr.Londhe

10

1

8

Dr.Devade

10

1

9

Dr.Bobade

10

1

Vaijapur

1

Dr.Pardesi

4

1

2

Dr.Shah

6

1

3

Dr.Joshi

6

1

4

Dr.Bhopale

6

1

5

Dr. Annadate

6

1

Khuldabad

1

Dr.Hashmi

4

1

Kannad

1

Trupathi Hospital

5

1

2

Dr. Jadhav

5

1

3

Dr. Sk. Mukhtar

5

1

Sillod

1

Dr. Mandlecha

6

1

2

Dr. Jaiswal

6

1

3

Dr. Shah

6

1

4

Mumta Hospital

10

1

5

Dr. Karnawat

6

1

6

Dr. Zolwar

10

1

7

Dr. Sonar

6

1


List of Authorised Dealer of Veterinary Medicines in Aurangabad District.

Sr.

Name of Stores

Address

Telephone

1

Astro Enterprises

Near Anjali Cinema

339822

2

Kamghenu Pashu

Kranti Chowk Police

339293(S)

Aushadhalaya

Station Road

334515(R)

3

Nitin Agencies

Bhora Niwas,Khadkeshwar

332612

4

Vishwa Distributors

Shop No.2 Nishant Garden

328732


Network of Veterinary Services in Aurangabad District

Sr.

Taluka

Veterinary Centres

Veterinary

No.

Sub-Centres

1

Aurangabad

1.Vet.Hospital Aurangabad Head Quarter

1. Pal

2.Veternary Centres Aurangabad City

2.Phulambari

Cantonment

3. Mali Wada

3.Kingaon

4.Karmad

4.Chikalthana

5.Pimpri

5.harsul

6.Gocatgaon

6.shekta

7.Ladsawangi

7.Ganori

8. Dhamam Gaon

8.Chitepimpal gaon

9.kumbhe Phal

10.Naigaon

11.Bhiddon

12. Warud Qzai

2

Kannad

1.Kannad

1.Karanjkheda

2.Nagad

2.Wasdi

3.Deogaon Rangori

3Chopner

4.Chincholi

4.Bahirgaon

5.Nachmvee

5.Hatnur

6.Aurala

6.Wadner

7.Mulwadi

7.Dealana

8.Chilkalthana

9.Borsar

3

Gangapur

1.Gangapur

1.Waluj

2.Turkabad Kharadi

3.Shendur vad

4.Siddhnath wad gaon

5.kaigaon Taka

6.Dongaon

7.Kate Pipalagaon

8.Jambhada

9.Gajgaon

4

Khuldabad

1.Khuldabad V.D.

1.Kasabkheda

2.Bajar Sawangi

2.Takli Raja

3.Sultanpur

3.Gaue borgaon

4.Ghodegaon VAC.

4.Bodkhar

5

Vaijapur

1.Vaijapur v.D.

2.lasurgaon

3.Shivur

4.Manur

5.Loni

6.Mahalgaon VAC

7.Sawkheda gangapur

8.Viregaon

9.khandala

10.Gadhepimpalgaon

11.Dahegaon

12.Babhulgaon

13.Nagthana

14.Manegaon

15.Dhondalgaon

6

Paithan

1.paithan

1.Apegaon

2.Adule

2.Wahegaon

3.Dharkin

3.Deogaon

4.Pachod

4.Rahatgaon

5.Bihamavdua

5.kadethan

6.Porgaon

6.Adgaon

7.Dawalwadi

8.Thergaon

9.Bidkin

10.Balanagar

11.Dhakephae

12.Chitepimpalgaon

13.Bokud jalgaon

7

Sillod

1.Sillod

1.Borgaon

2.Vadod Bajzr

2.Golegaon

3.Bharadi

3.Shivana

4.Ajintha

4.Udamgaon

5.Ghatnanda

5.Babra

6.Panvardod

6.Nillod

7.Palod

7.Alland

8.Anvi

8.Andhari

9.Palsi

9.Amthana

10.jabahi

8

Soegaon

1.Soegaon

2.Barati

3.Sawad Bajor

4.Fardapur

5.Godegaon

6.Wadgaon TAjaji

 

Annexure I

Suggested Pro forma for “In” Message

Date :

Sr.No of In Message

Time at which message was

received :

Initials of the person receiving the

message :

Received from

Addressed to :

Text of message :

Message transferred to :   Name                                                  Designation

                                        Date                                                    Time :

Message transferred by :  Name                                                    Designation  

                                        Date                                                    Time :

Instructions/follow-up to be done :

Suggested Pro forma for “OUT” Message

Date :

Out Message Sr. No :

Time at which message was

sent :

Sr. No of In Message  to which out message relates :

Addressed from

Addressed to

Text of message :

Message transferred to :   Name                                                   Designation

                                        Date                                                      Time :

Message transferred by :  Name                                                   Designation

                                         Date                                                     Time :

Instructions/follow-up to be done :

Suggested Pro forma for “Out” Message register

Date
Time
of dis-
patch
Out Mess-age
Sr.No :
Related In Message No. if any
Add-ressed from

Add-ressed to

Copies to :

Mode
(WL /Tel/
Message)
of dispatch :

Instructions
/follow-up
to be done
Remarks
                   

Suggested Pro forma for “In” Message register

Date
Time of receipt
Mess-age
Sr.No :
Recei-ved
from
Address-ed to

Message trans-ferred to

Copies to :

Mode
(WL /Tel/ Message)
of receipt :

Instruct-ions/
follow-up
to be done
Remarks
                   

 

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