02/09/2014
Status Report
Government Resolutions
Post Disaster Rehabilitation
  Project Related Rehabilitation
  International (ECMWF)
  India
  Regional
 
IMD - Mumbai
 

District - Chandrapur

Introduction

 As a part of the overall preparedness of the state, the Government of Maharashtra has a State Disaster Management Action Plan to support and strengthen the efforts of the district administration. In this context, every district has evolved it's own District Disaster Management Action Plan (DDMAP). It is expected that these multi-hazard response plans would increase the effectiveness of administrative intervention.

Multi-disaster Response Plan

The DDMAP addresses the districts’ response to disaster situations such as earthquakes, floods, cyclones, epidemics,   off-site industrial disasters and roads accidents and fires. Some of these disasters  such as floods and earthquakes affect large areas causing extensive damage to life, property and environment while others such as epidemics only  affect large populations. In any case, the management of these disasters requires extensive resources and manpower for containment by remedial action.

The present  plan is a multi-hazard response plan for the  disasters and outlines the institutional framework required for managing such situations. However, the plan assumes a disaster specific form  in terms of  the actions to be taken by the various agencies involved in the disaster. The front-end or  local level of any disaster response organisation will differ  depending upon the  type of disaster, but at the level of the back-end i.e., at the controlling level at the district  it will almost remain same, for all types of disasters.

Objectives

The objectives of the District Disaster Management Action Plan are :

·         To improve preparedness at the district level, through risk and vulnerability analysis , to disasters and to minimise the impact of disasters in terms of human, physical and material loss.

·         To ascertain the status of existing resources and facilities available with the various agencies involved in the management of disasters  in the district  and make it an exercise in capability building of district administration. This enables the district to face a disaster in a more effective way and builds confidence across different segments of society. It will be a positive factor for long term development of the district.

·         To utilise different aspects of disaster mitigation for development planning as a tool for location and area specific planning for development in the district.

·         To use scientific and technological advances in Remote Sensing, GIS etc. in preparation of this plan with a view to ensure their continuous use for development planning.

·         To develop a framework for proper documentation of future disasters in the district, to have an update on critical information essential to a plan, to critically analyse and appraise responses and to recommend appropriate strategies

·         To evolve DDMAP as an effective managerial tool within the overall policy framework of Government of Maharashtra.

Response to disasters, in the absence of a defined plan,  would be arbitrary leading to overemphasis of some actions and  absence of other actions which could be critical. The objectives of any disaster management plan should be to localise a disaster and to the maximum extent possible contain it so as to minimise the impact on life, the environment and property. A formal plan for managing disasters is therefore necessary. This would include

a.      pre-planning a proper  sequence  of  response actions,

b.      allocation of responsibilities to the participating agencies,

c.      developing codes and standard operating procedures for various departments and relief agencies involved.

d.      inventory of existing facilities and resources

e.      mechanisms for effective management of resources

f.        co-ordination of all relief activities including those of NGOs to ensure a coordinated and effective response.

g.      Co-ordination with the State response machinery for appropriate support

h.      Monitoring and evaluation of actions taken during relief and rehabilitation

"Outline of Vulnerability Assessment" prepared by CSSD/EMC has been used as the basic instrument to collate district level information to meet the database requirements for the preparation of DDMAP.

Policy Statement

The underlying policy of the DDMAP is to protect life, environment and property while ensuring mitigation  of  the disaster to the maximum extent possible, relief to those affected  and restoration of  normalcy at the earliest.

Essentially, communities  draw their support from the social institutions, administrative structure, and values and aspirations they cherish. Disasters may temporarily disorganise the social units and the administrative system and disrupt their lives built around these values and aspirations. A systematic effort to put back the social life on its normal course with necessary technology support and resources will contribute significantly to the resilience of the community and nation. 

This policy forms the basis of the DDMAP strategy. It aims at capacity building and prompt utilization of resources in a disaster situation through a partnership of the GOM, NGOs, Private Initiatives and the community. In pursuance with this policy, DDMAP addresses itself to strengthening the pre-disaster and post-disaster responses of various actors and stakeholders including the “victims” of the disaster.

OVERVIEW OF CHANDRAPUR DISTRICT

Location

·         Chandrapur District is located between 19.30’ N to 20.45’N Latitude and 78.46’E longitude. It is the easternmost district of the state of Maharashtra.

·         Adjoining districts are Bhandara, Nagpur, & Wardha in the North, Gadchiroli is in the East. Yeotmal in the West and Adilabad District of Andhra Pradesh is in the South.

·         Mumbai is the State capital located on the Western coast and Chandrapur district is located in the South East of Maharashtra State. Maharashtra covers part of Western ghats with coastel line, Deccan platue and Satpura ranges.

·         Geographically Maharashtra is located 16.40 N to 22.10 N Latitude and 72.60 E to 80.9 E Longitude.

AREA AND ADMINISTRATIVE DIVISIONS

The State of Maharashtra consists of 31 districts, divided in 6 administrative divisions viz. Kokan, Nashik, Pune, Aurangabad, Amraoti & Nagpur. Chandrapur district is located in Nagpur Division

This district is divided into 4 Sub Divisions, having 12 Talukas as under:

                        SUB DIVISIONS                                  TALUKAS

                        ----------------------                                 --------------

            Chandrapur                                         Chandrapur, Mul, Saoli, Gondpipri

           

Warora                                                Warora, Bhadravati, Chimur

            Rajura                                                 Rajura, Korpana

            Bramhapuri                                         Bramhapuri, Nagphid, Sindewahi

Geographical area of this district is 10443 Sq. Kms. The population of the sistrict as per 1991  Census is 17,68,945.

There are 7 Municipal towns and 13 major rural centres having 815 village panchayats.

SALIENT FEATURES AND LAND USE PATTERN

Chandrapur district can be divided into two regions on the basis of district physiographic features.

1.      The plain and the fertile region lying in river valleys of the Wardha, the Penganga and

       the Wainganga rivers - The  widely spread  and flat terrain exhibits mostly rolling  

       topography with residual knolls of the hills in the southern portion while in the

       northern portion that is in Brahmapuri tahsil, fairly wide flood and alluvial plains

       covered with fertile loams are observed. The flat terrain of Chandrapur district on the

       whole lies generally between 250 m (MSL) . In the Penganga valley, flat terrain covers

       very little area in the south western portion of the district. The area occupied by the

       Penganga basin in the south-western parts of the district in Rajura and Chandur tahsils

       exhibits mostly hilly topography. The hils are known as Gadchandur and Manikgarh

       hills the altitude in general rises to 500m above MSL.

2.      The upland hilly region - The upland hilly region lies between the Wardha and the Wainganga rivers comprising parts of Warora, Chandrapur and mojor part of Brahmapuri tahsils. It has sandy soil. The mills in Wardha, Brahmapuri and Brahmapuri district are low altitude hills called ‘Chimur-Perjagarh-Mul hills’. The altitude of these hills is on average 300 m. above MSL.

SOIL      

Soil is the most important feature of physiography the formation of which largely depends upon the topography rock types and drainge. The cropping pattern  in the are is  governed by the thickness of soil mantle, its texture and constancy. The soils of Chandrapur district are of various types. Each type covering a well-defined tract which displays cropping pattern of totally different level. The soils occurring in the Wardha and the Wainganga valleys are generally most fertile.

The different types of soils occurring in the district are locally called as Kali, Kamhar, Morand, Khardi, Wardhi, Retari, Bardi and Pandhari which are described as follows:

Kali – This type as mostly confined to the banks of the Wardha and the Wainganga rivers and is derived from Deccan traps. It is fertile and capable and retaining moisture and is best suited for cotton wheat, gram, jowar, and linseed.

Kamhari – This type is less fertile as compared to Kali. It is fertile as compared to kali. It is observed in river valleys as well as in tank beds.

Morand – This type comprises light coloured loam containing mere sand and is suitable for irrigation due its loamy texture. This is most common soil in the district.

Khardi – It is light coloured soil and full of stones and as such it is very poor quality soil.

Wardhi – It is light coloured soil with good amount of sand with sufficient clay to keep it covered mainly by this type of soil in Bramhpuri, Nagbhir and Chimur tahsils.

Retari and Bardi – These soils are of no use if irrigation facilities are not available. The former type that is Retari is mostly sandy and pebbly.

Pandhary – This is an artificial soil’ It is gray in colour and is found around the

village deriving its colour and fertility from the ashes.

LAND USE PATTERN

            Inhabited area                         :           880 Sq. Kms.

            Agricultural area                      :           4810 Sq. Kms.

            Industrial area                         :           32.34 Sq. Kms.

            Forest cover                            :           3750 Sq. Kms.

                                                                        ( 34.33 %)

            Waste Land                            :           230 Sq. Kms.

            Drought Prone area                :           NIL

Geology and Geomorphology

Geology

Geologically, Chandrapur districts presents a variety of statigraphic units right from Archaeans to recent alluvium and laterites. The district is gifted with deposits of various minerals like coal, iron.

Geological sequence of formations is as follows :

Age

Formation

Rock Types

Recent to Subrecent

Alluvium, Soils

Laterites

Sand, Clay, Silt, Soils & laterites

Lower Eocene to upper cretaceour

Deccan Traps

Basalts, Weathered, vesicular & massive basalts

Triassic

Upper Gondwanas group maleris

Clay, Shales, Sandstones

Lower Triassic to Upper Carboniferous

Lower Gondwanas group :

Kamthis

Barakars

Talchirs

Reddish Brown Sandstone Sahle Clay.

Light grey to white felspathic sandstones, coal seams & Clay

Geenish to dark olive green coloured shales & coarse grained sandstones.

Pre-cambrian

Vindhyans

Shales, Sandstones, flaggy & massive limestones & sandstones of variegated colours

Archaeans

Crystallines & older metamorphics

Gneisses, quartzites, schists with acid & basic intrusives.


Archaeans

The Archaeans comprise gneisses, quartzites, banded haematite quartzites, schists with basic intrusives like pyroxenites, anphibolites etc. The rocks are intruded by several dykes, trending NE-SE, are exposed in the eastern part of Chandrapur district. The dykes are highly shared. The Archaean formations occupy 31.21% of the total area.

Vindhyans

The Vindhyans are represented mainly by flaggy and massive limestones,shales and sandstones. The lenticular patches of breccia with angular fragments cemented by calcareous matrix are found at places in limestones. The limestones are dolomitic at places. Sandstones and quartzities are hard copact and forms ridges. The limestones occupy an extensive area in Rajura and Chimur tahsil. The Vindhyans overlie Archaeans basement with well defined unconfirmity. The area occupied by Vindhyans in the district is 23% of total area of district.

Lower Gondwanas

The lower Gondwanas are represented by Talchirs, Barakars and Kamthis series. The lower Gondwanas are exposed in Warora, Chandrapur, Ballarpur and Rajura Tahsil. The thickness of lower Gondwanas very laterally.

Talchir Series : The Talchir series consists of boulder beds which are conglomeratic and pebbly in nature at the base. The olive green coloured shales and greenish yellow sandstones are the other rock types. These sandstones are rocks are exposed over a wide area stretching from west up to the boundary of Maharashtra and Andhra Pradesh. The Typical Talchir olive greenshales are exposed at village Tadali on Warora- Chandrapur road. In Wirur area, the base of Talchir formation is defined by tillites with predominance of boulders of   sandstones. The tillites are succeeded by cross bedded sandstones and the  Talchir` sequence is much alternated here. The total area covered by Talchir in the district is 750 sq. Kms. i.e. 7 % of the total area.

Barakar Series : The Barakars are represented by white coloured, fine to medium grained sandstone, shales, clays and coal seams. The thickness of Barakars increases towards east and thickness in general ranges between 30-250 m. But the exposures of these rocks are scarcely seen and mostly concealed below the Kamthi sandstones, The area covered by Barakars in the district is 1% of the total area.

Kamthi Series : The Kamthi series comprises sandstones, silstones, variecated clays and shales. They are exposed over a wide area in Chandrapur district. In the eastern part of the district, the maximum thickness of 500 m can be expected. These sandstones are yellowish and white in colour, fine to coarse grained in  and at places ferruginous in nature. These sandstones are found to be siliceous or fossiliferous at some places in the district. The area occupied by these rocks in the district is 19% of the total area.

Upper Gondwanas

The upper Gondwana formation is represented by Maleri series. The rock types are sandstones and shales. The sandstones are fine grained whitish coloured and calcareous un nature. The shales are of red colour and are found in a small patches in the south-eastern part of Chandrapur district. The areal extent of these rocks are very small.

Lametas

Lameta beds comprise silicified sandstones, cherts, marls limestones and clays. The are usually white in colour with reddish shades. The limestones are bluish grey coloured and show nodular structure at places. The marls are white, red or brown in colour. Lameta beds occur in isolated patches in the northern part of the district occuping a very little area. They lie unconformable over the Kamthi series.

Deccan Traps

Deccan traps consist of basaltic lava flews of fissure type eruptions. Each flew usually comprises massive basalt at the base, followed by vesicular basalts. At places amygadaloidal or zeolitic basalt are also observed. The two flows are separated by intertrappean beds. The massive basalts are dark grey coloured and hard and compact in nature and fine to medium grained. The vesicular basalts are dark greenish or grey in colour and contains vesicles of rounded to sub-rounded or irregular shape which are interconnected at places. These flows are mainly of ‘aa’ type. Intertrappean beds are mostly dirty white to greenish coloured clays which is occasionally calcareour in nature. Deccan traps and lametas are found to occupy considerable area of the district in Warora, Bhadravati and Gadchandur tahsils and covers an area of 1122 sq, Km. I.e. 11% of the total area of the district.

Laterites

Laterites are commonly seen as over Deccan traps, Kamthi sandstones and gneisses. It is generally reddish brown in colour. It is hard and thickness of which varies from a few cm. to 8 m.

Alluvium

In the district, Alluvium is mostly river-alluvium and comprises sand, silt and clays. It is generally found along the banks of nalas and rivers. The thickness varies from 8 to 35 m as observed along the Wardha, the Erai and the Wainganga river courses. Italso contains gravel along with sand, silt, clays at places. In Brahmapuri tahsil, patches of alluvium (about 100 sq.km.) are observed on the western bank of the Wainganga river near Brahmapuri. Similar patches of alluvium are also found of Chimur and warora along the Erai and the Andhari nadi and also around Chandrapur along the course of the Wardha reiver. The maximum thickness of alluvium is observed in Brahmapuri area

Laterites and Alluvium together occupy together an area of 820 km. i.e. 8% of the tota area of the distrit.

Soil Mantle

The regur or black cotton soil is derived from Deccan traps commonly known as “Kali”. Red soil is most common in the area covered by gneisses and other crystalline rocks. There is a thin veneer of soil (8 to 15 m) over lying the Gondwana formation in the north-western part of the district.  

Structure and Subsurface Geology

On the baisi of availble subsurface data collected during exploration of coal deposits and coal mining it is found that of all the formations in the district, the Gondwanas are structurally highly distributed on a large scale.

On a regional scale Gondwana formations can be classified as broad anticlinal structure plugging towards NNW. The Sasti, Ballarshah, Lalpeth, Mahakali, Reyatwari and Durgapur coal fields in the district are located in the eastern limb of an anticline while Ghugus, Magri, Telwase and Chinchola coal fields are located in western limb.

Chanda-Wardha Gondwana basin occuring in the district is essentially a broad graben structure. Geographical survey in Chanda-Wardha valley also shows that whole area is associated with a negative Bougar Anomaly ranging from 20 to 72 mgd. Which further confirms the graben configuration. Structurally Wardha valley basin represents by a number of faults resulting in a number of different coal fields around Chardrapur. The structural analysis of the Wardha valley shows that Gondwana formations are aligned in three sub-parallel troughs. The westernmost i.e.  the Pranahita trough contains major coal resources in the area.

In Durgapur area, five major faults trending E-W have been detected with a general downshrow towards south varying from 50 ti 70 m. The entire area between Durgapur and Lalpeth Colliery lies between two major fualts with regional trend of NW-SE The same NW-SE tredning fault system are dominant between Isapur block and Durgapur in the north. This has resulted in the epetition of coal seams.

The other formation like Vindhyan, Lametas, Deccan Traps are not showing any major strucctural disturbances within the formation. The structural features noticed in these rockas are fractures, joints and weathering. The gneisses, Vindhyan sandstones and massive  basalts are weathered, jointed and fractured at a number of places. The degree of weathering  os varying  from moderate to hogh. The thicknesss of weathered zones normally ranges between 3 and 5 m. in gneisses and Deccan trap while it is comparatively less in Vindhyans. The depth of jointed zones also varies from place to place. The unconformity is observed between Vindhyans and Gondwanas and also between Gondwanas and Deccan Traps.

The Archaeans which are exposed in eastern part of the district are separated from other sedimentary formations by N-S trending boundary fault. The geophysical data shows that the boundary fault appears to be normal fault having a throw of about 500 to 700m.

The Archaeans basement and overlying Vindhyans are separated by district incomformity. The Kamthis and Barakars are also separated by angular infomformity and because of these  the amount of dips of the two formations show discordance. The Kamthis are having low dips as compared to Barakars.

The major portion of the Archaeans are subjected to tectonic disturbances resoulting in a number of major and minor lineaments in the area. The acid intrusives such as pegmatites and brecciated qualtzites and basic dikes are also presents in the area.

On the basis of the study of aerial photographs of Chandrapur district, lineaments are fracture planes in the rock formations which are to be confirmed by field checks.

Geomorphology

The total area of the district has been divided into eleven geomorphic units. The Structural Ridges, Structural Hills, Highly and Moderately Dissected Plateau over the Deccan Traps are grouped into geomorphological units of structural origin. The pediments/pediplains and Denudational hills are grouped into geomorphological units of denudational origin, whereas, the younger and older alluvium form the units of fluvial origin.

Climate and Rainfall    

Chandrapur district enjoys a tropical climate with very hot summers and very cold winters. The hot season is from March to May. May is the hottest month of the year with the mean maximum temperature being 44°C and the mean minimum temperature being 29°C. Winter is from November to February with the minimum temperatures varying from 3°C to 8°C.

The district receives it’s rainfall (about 90%) from the south west monsoon from June to September. The avarage annual rainfall is about 1200 mm. The rainfall generally increases as one goes from the west to the east.

Table below  shows rainfall data calculated for the period of ---15-----years.

Average rainfall                       :           1214 MMs. Maximum rainfall                     :           ------- A) In a year                              :           1715.8 MMs.                                                             In 1994 B) Within 24 hours                  :           448 MMs. On                                                             14.8.86 at Warora. The  one day high rainfall of 448 mm on 14.8.86 resulted in very high and sudden floods in river Irai and its tributaries. Such flash floods do occur some times due to concentrated rainfall in catchment area of river Irai and release of excess water from Irai dam by the authorities.

Social Economic Features

Demographic features

According to the 1991 census, the demographic features observed in Chandrapur district are as follows :

Total Population

:

1768958

Total Male Population

:

907858

Total Female Population

:

661100

Sex Ratio

:

948

Urban Population

:

496048

Rural Population

:

1272874

Percentage of Urban

:

28.04 %

Population to total population

:

Population Density

:

155 per sq.kms.

Literacy Rate

:

59.41 %

Male Literacy Rate

:

6.63%

Female Literacy Rate

:

39.02%

SC percentage                                                :                       16.87

ST percentage                                                :                       19.70

Slum Population percentage              :                       6.26%

Population below poverty line :                       13.36%

Scheduled caste, Scheduled tribe and Slum population taken together in the district is 33%. The population below poverty line is 13%. Thus about 46% population is economically and socially disadvantaged. This lot suffers more due to disaster like floods, earthquake, epidemics etc. It is necessary to shift the families living in blud-zone of floods and low lying areas of urban slums to safer sites.      

Urban and Rural Centres in Chandrapur District

Urban Locations

Sr.

No.

Name of the Urban Centre

Population as per 1991 Census

Population density per sq.km.

Major occupation pattern

1

Chandrapur

226105

4017

Traden labours

2

Ballarpur

83511

4105

Traden industrial worker

3

Warora

33637

4247

Agriculture traden

4

Rajura

18969

6474

Agriculture traden

5

Mul

18008

778

Agriculture traden

6

Bramhapuri

26631

1215

Agriculture traden

Major Rural Centres (above 10000 population and important places  )

Sr.No

Name of the Rural centre

Population as per 1991 Census

Population Density per km.

Major occupational patterns

1

Durgapur

12741

2130

Agriculturals industrial workers

2

Ghugus  

25001

1932

16.89% Major

7.20%Urban

3

Urjanagar

14753

1510

4

Chimur

13500

800

Agricultures

5

Nagbheed

10578

650

Agr.Labouring

6

Sindewahi

12450

780

Agr.labouring

7

Gadchandur

12683

1810

Agriculture industrial labour

8

Majari (Shivajinagar)

13242

1480

Agricultural labour

9

Bhadrawati 

19184

5658

Agricultural labour

10

Saoli (Tq Hqr.)

7498

540

Agricultural labour

11

Korpana (Tq Hqr)

2.026

550

Agricultural labour

12

Gondpipri (Tq)

5557

720

Agricultural labour

13

Jiwati (Proposed Tq.Hqr.)

1760

420

Agricultural labour

Historical and Religious Centres

Information of historical and religious centres compiled to assess possible influx of large population on specific occasion. This is important information useful to the district administration for management of transport, health service, sanitary services, fire, law & order problems etc.

Sr.No

Name of Historical Centre

Name of Religious Centre

Nearest Urban or Major Rural Centre

1

Fort of  Gond Raja at Chandrapur

Mahakali Temple at Chandrapur

Chandrapur

Chandrapur Town

2

Manikgadh Fort Tq. Rajura

--

Rajura (UC)

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

--

Jogapur Maroti Temple

Marai Patan

(Adya Devat of Tribals)

Shankar Deo Temple

Shiv Mandir Minghri

Adyol Tekari

Somnath

Dabha Kondya Maharaj Yatra

Somnath

Wadha

Balaji Devasthan

Tukdoji Maharaj Gondoda

Jain Tample Badrawati

Bhadreshwar Temple

Ramdegi Gondrani Temple Near Shegaon

Rajura (UC)

Korpana (MRC)

Rajura (UC)

Sidewahi (MRC)

Bramhapuri (UC)

Mul (UC)

Gondpipri

Mul

Ghugus

Chimur

Chimur

Bhadrawati

Bhadrawati

Warora

A talukawise summary of the tourist population visiting the various historical and religrious centres

Taluka

Period of Festive Occations (Months)

Estimated Tourist or Visiting Population

Chandrapur

Round the year

5000

200 per day

Chandrapur

April-May one month Chaitra Pournima

500000 to 700000

20000 to 25000 per day

Rajura

Round the year

50 to 100

Tourist per day

Rajura

October

15000

Korpana

April

15000

Rajura

March

Seasonal Migration

Sr.No

Purpose

Area (specify Taluka)

Period

Estimated Population

In

Out

1

For earning wages in agriculture fields

1.Rajura Taluka

Villages

 Pitiguda

 Markagondi

 Titavi

 Tatakohad

 Ambezari

  Nagarala

January to March

750

2

For earning wages in agriculture fields

2.Korpana Taluka

Villages

Pudiyal Mohada

Kambezari

Wani BK

Dhonda Arjuni

Chikhali

January to

March

750

3

For earning wages for Tendu leaves picking

3. Gondpipri Taluka

April to May

3235

4

For earning wages and coal loading and unloading and bricks manufacturing

4. Chandrapur

Villages

Padoli

Durgapur

Chandrapur

Visapur

October to May

35000

5

For earning wages on bricks manufacturing and stone quarring works

5. Warora Taluka

Villages

Ponzwani

Shegaon

Fattepur

Bhatala

Temburda

September to May

5000 from M.P.

6

For earning wages on bricks manufacturing and stone quarring work

6. Bhadrawati

Villages

Nandori

Dongargaon

Check Basang

September to May

2000 from M.P.

Agricultural and Crop Pattern in the District

Information regarding main agricultural crops, their cropping period and market area is furnish below :

Types

Names

Cropping Period in months

Market (District State, Export)

Major crops

( Irrigated)

Paddy ( Kharif)

Wheat

Gram

Summer paddy

June to November

October to January

October to January

January to April

District & State

District

District

District & State

Major crops

(Non-irrigated)

Paddy (Kharif)

Soybean

Cotton

Kharif Jawar

Rabi Jawar

Wheat

Gram

June to November

July to October

June to December

July to October

October to January

October to January

October to January

District & State

District & State

District

District

District

District

District

Major Cash Crops

Cotton

June to December

District

Major Plantations

Nil

--

--

River Systems and Dams

Rivers

The entire area of the district falls in the Godavari basin. The area is drained by major tributaries of the Godavari river. The major Tributaries are the Wardha, the Wainganga and the Penganga rivers. The Penganga, flowing along part of the Western boundary, meets the Wardha river near Ghugus to form the Wardha river. It further flowsin NW-SE direction finally merging into the Wainganga river at the south eastern corner of the district. After this confluence the river at the south eastern corner of the district. After this confluence the river along with their sub tributaries rising in the unplands within the district drain whole area of the district. Rising in the unplands within the district drain whole area of the district.

The Wainganga river which flows along the border of Chandrapur and Gadchiroli district is the main river of the district.

The Wardha is the only perennial river in the district having the longest river course as compared to the other two major rivers. The main  tributaries of the Wardha river are the Erai rises in the northern part of Warora tahsil and flows along due south over a length of 80 km. till it meets the Wardha just south of Chandrapur at Wardha village.

The Penganga flowing along western border takes east west course and then joins the wardha river at Ghugus. The area occupied by Gadchiroli tahsil and part of Rajura tahsil is drained by the Penganga and its tributaries.

Thus the main rivers in Chandrapur district are as under :

1.      Wainganga

2.      Wardha

3.      Andheri

4.      Irai

5.      Painganga

6.      Pranhita

Dams

There are 7 complete Medium projects and 29 Minor Irrigation project in this district. There is no completed major project. The details are given below. 

Name of the Dam or Irrigation Project

Location

Capacity in

( Millon M³)

River

Catchment Area (km²)

Target Command Area (km²)

Medium Projects

Asolamenda

Pathari

67.015

Pathari Nala

245.53

99.19

Ghorajhari

Govindpur

45.08

Bokardonala

90.65

52.00

Naleshwar

Kukarheti

8.88

Mul River

87.41

16.88

Chargaon

Chargaon

21.70

Chargaon Nala

148.30

15.00

Chandai

Nimdhala

13.20

Chandai Nala

55.04

20.56

Amalnalla

Amalnalla Gadchandur

22.70

Amalnala

84.17

29.32

Labhansarad

Kawdapur

8.22

Labhansarad Nala

48.70

18.21

Minor Projects

Gadmoushi

Gadmoushi

2.44

Localnalla

11.65

3.52

Khairi

Khairi

3.99

--do--

10.36

8.30

Kinhi

Kinhi

0.565

--do--

3.10

2.00

Maregaon

Maregaon

2.61

--do--

10.36

1.15

Pawanpar

Pawanpar

4.72

--do--

13.47

2.83

Chindhi

Chindhi

0.90

--do--

6.47

1.70

Kusarla

Kusarla

2.91

--do--

7.77

4.86

Rudrapur

Rudrapur

1.25

--do--

5.93

1.70

Janala

Janala

2.01

--do--

6.47

2.13

Itoli

Itoli

0.813

--do--

2.59

1.38

Junona

Junona

1.96

--do--

13.57

1.32

Antargaon

Antargaon

1.841

--do--

3.50

2.66

Karoli

Karoli

1.643

--do--

3.89

2.70

Ringdeo

Ringdeo

1.312

--do--

5.26

2.22

Mudza

Mudza

1.362

--do--

14.50

4.78

Adyalmendha

Adyalmendha

0.820

--do--

1.86

1.21

Golabhuj

Golabhuj

0.524

--do--

2.33

1.65

Manora

Manora

1.815

--do--

9.86

3.78

Devai

Devai

1.357

--do--

5.06

2.35

Dhaba

Dhaba

2.527

--do--

2.527

4.65

Thergaon

Thergaon

0.758

--do--

3.62

1.78

Dongargaon

Gondpipri

Dongargaon

Gondpipri

1.082

--do--

5.568

2.41

Bhatala

Bhatala

1.65

--do--

6.20

3.50

Bhisi

Bhisi

2.29

--do--

5.95

4.96

Dongargaon Chimur

Dongargaon Chimur

3.168

--do--

3.70

4.98

Kholdhoda

Kholdhoda

1.255

--do--

4.40

2.38

Thelia Nala

Thelia Nala

1.152

--do--

6.47

4.21

Sondo

Sondo

2.15

--do--

8.75

5.38

Shegaon Khurd

Shegaon Khurd

1.162

--do--

4.15

2.32

Similarly there is one major project, two medium projects & 12 Minor irrigation projects under construction. Information regarding these projects given below.

Dams Under Construction

Name of the Dam or Irrigation Project

Location

Capacity in (Millon m³)

River

Estimeted Time of Completion

Catchment Area km²

Target Command Area km²

Major Dams

Human

Sirkoda

Tq.Sindewahi

313.731

Human River

7 Year

1033.00

465.00

Medium Dams

Pakadiguddam

Korgao

Tq.Korpana

13.31

Deoghat Nala

June 1998

51.15

47.80

Dongargaon

Dongargaon

Tq.Rajura

14.18

Dongargaon Nala

4 Years

54.50

71.00

Minor Dams

Moulzari

Mul

Local Nala

1998

9.45

4.29

Mangli

Kawdjaj

Tq.Chandrapur

2.48

--do--

1998

7.34

4.57

Pipari Dixit

Chak Bembal

Tq.Mul

1.90

--do--

1998

10.87

3.60

Umari

Umari

Tq.Saoli

2.696

--do--

1998

5.70

2.76

Dhamangaon

Bhongoram

Talodhi

1.07

--do--

1997

10.48

2.81

Shegaon (BK)

Shegaon (BK)

Tq.Warora

1.855

--do--

1998

7.77

3.37

Bhisipitichuwa

Pitichuwa

Tq.Chimur

1.52

--do--

1997

11.21

5.03

Bhasboran

Chikhali

Tq.Mul

2.97

--do--

2000

8.11

5.50

Bamngaon

Bamngaon

Tq.Chandrapur

2.17

--do--

2000

8.96

4.78

Nimbala

Nimbala

Tq.Chandrapur

1.51

--do--

2000

7.02

3.40

Bhendara

Bhendara

Tq.Rajura

1.42

--do--

2000

6.78

2.63

Ballarpur

Ballarpur

Tq.Bramhapur

1.35

Construction of these dams will help reducing the intensity of floods ever eartquake hazard precaution need to be studied for al dams.

Besides above projects there are 5 medium and 3 minor irrigation projects which are proposed for construction in future. Details of these projects are given below.

Proposed Dam for construction in future

Name of Dam

Location Taluka

Capacity in Mm.3

River

Location of Irrigation project village

Catchment in sq.km.

Target Command area km²

Medium Dams

Hattigota

Chandrapur

30.60

Hattigota Nalla

Korti Tukum

93.37

63.30

Nimbughat

Bramhapuri

7.42

Nimbughat Nalla

Mendki

26.55

37.70

Garadi

--do--

22.60

Garadi Nalla

Chandgaon

66.40

68.00

Butti Nalla

--do--

49.84

Butti Nalla

Panolimenda

203.00

113.30

Bhendara

Rajura

27.88

Sondo Nalla

Bhendara

106.45

49.25

Miner Dams

Bhadga

Chimur

6.98

Local Nalla

Talodhi Nalla

26.55

14.70

Mendhi Nalla

Sindewahi

9.84

--do--

Magarmendha`

24.60

21.27

Gaimukh

Mul

1.53

Gaimukh Nalla

Sawanga

(Bodge)

5.89

12.14

Power Stations and Electricity Instalations

There is super thermal power station of 2340 MW capacity. Located at Durgapur about 5 mks.from Chandrapur city.

Industries

1.         No. of Industrial Estate                                    - 8

2.        Type of Industries - Engineering, Mineral Based, Paper Cement & Chemical

3.         Total work force in Industries              - 19752

4.         No. of Chemical Industries                             - 15

5.         No. of Pipelines Carrying Chemicals  - Nil

6.         No. of Potentially hazardous location-

            1.         Chandrapur                 - Chemical LPG fuelling

            2.         Ballarpur                      - Paper Mill, Coal Mines

            3.         Ghugus                       - Cement, Coal Mines

            4.         Bhadrawati                  - Ordance Factory

            5.         Gadchandur                - Cement Factories.

7.         No. of vechicles carrying hazardous raw                   -           400

material for industries per month

8.         No. of vechicles carrying hazardous finished             -           780

products from industries in a month

9.                  No. of vechicles passing through the district carrying-          NIL

Hazards material for industries during month

10.       No. of container terminal                                             -           NIL

Category wise listing of existring large industries in the district.       

Type of Industry

Investment in Crore

Employment

Remarks

Paper

60.00

3953

Cement

24.32

1140

Steel & Ferro Magnese

37.13

926

Cement

-

765

Cement

60.60

1131

Refrigerator

04.00

6000.00`

627

5

Electricity

1701.00

Defence oriented

Coal

21008.00

25820

Paper

6.00

403

Beta Naphthol

1049

170

Mill Board

-

126

Beta Hydroxy Naphthoic Acid

1.63

45

Castor Oil

318.00

-

Cement

25.00

900

Cement

13.00

700

Transport and Communication Network

Road Network, Waterways, Airways, Airways and Railways

Number of National Highways

Nil

Length ( in kms) of National Highways

---

State Highways ( in kms)

777

ZP roads ( in kms)

3363

Number of bridges on rivers

47

Number of  ST depots

4

Number of Ports or Jetties

Nil

Number of Boats

10

Number of Railway Station with mail/express halts

4

Number of Railway bridges

15

Non-electrified Railway routes ( in kms)

15.01 Km.

Electrified Railway routes ( in kms.)

191.55 km.

Number of unmanned Railway crossings

12

Number of Airports / Air strips

One air strip at Chandrapur

Proposed Developmets

New Afforestation                          -           566.2 sq. kms.

New area declared as reserved  -           NIL      

forest.

New Industrial Estates Proposed

Sr. No.

Name of Industrial Estate/Area

Location

1.

Chandrapur Growth Centre ( Tadali )

Tadali,

Yerur,

Gawrala

Tq.Chandrapur

2.

Warora Growth Centre

Mohbala,

Naydeo,

Nimsada,

Tah. Warora

3.

Mul Growth Centre

Maregaon,

Chimda,

Kukud-Chimda,

Akapur,

Tah.Mul

4

Chimur Industrial Area

Chimur

Tah.Chimur

5

Bhadrawati Industrial Area

Rampuri Rith,

Gawrala

Tah. Bhadrawati

6.

Gondpipri Industrial Area

Karanji

Tah.Gondpipri

7.

Nagbhid Industrial Area

Navkhala

Tah. Nagbhid

8.

Sindewahi Industrial Area

Lonvahi

Tah. Sindewahi

9.

Bhadrawati

Vijaysan

Chargaon, Prpri

Tq. Bhadrawati

Large industries proposed to be set up in the district

Name of the Industry

Location

M/S. Ballarpur Industries LDT.,

Ballarpur, Dist. Chandrapur

Ballarpur

M/S. Associated  Cement Company,

Chandra Cement Works, Ghugus

Ghugus

Tq. Chandrapur

M/S. Maharashtra Electrosmelt Ltd.

Mul Road Chandrapur

Chandrapur

M/S Manikgarh Cement Company Ltd.

Gadchandur

Gadchandur

Tq. Rajura

M/S Larsen & Toubro Cement Ltd. Awarpur

Awarpur

Tq. Rajura

M/S Voltas Refrigerators,

At  Majara

Majara

Tq. Warora

M/S Ordance Factory AT Bhadrawati

Bhadrawati

Tq. Bhadrawati

M/S Chandrapur Thermal Power Station

Durgapur, Chandrapur

Chandrapur

M/S Western Coal Field Ltd., Chandrapur Area Chandrapur

Chandrapur

M/S Gaurave  Paper Mill, At. Hardoli

Hardoli

Tq. Bramhapuri

M/S Multi Organics Plant,

M.I.D.C. Chandrapur

Chandrapur

M/S Hariyana Coated Paper

M.I.D.C. Chandrapur

Chandrapur

M/S Abhideep Chemicals Pvt. Ltd. M.I.D.C. Chandrapur

Chandrapur

M/S Umred Agro Complex At. Kolari

Kolari

Tq. Chimur

Maratha Cement ( Gujrat Ambuja)

1.      Uparwahi

2.      Vihirgaon

3.      Chandur

      Tq. Rajura

.Ratnagiri

4.      Korpana Tq. Rajura

Central India Power Company

Taluka Bhadravati

Central India Coal Company

Baranj, Chichordi

Town Development Schemes

Sr.No

Name of the new Town, development scheme Undertaken/Proposed

Location of the Scheme

Ara in Sq. km.

Nearest Urban, major rural Centre

1.

Chandrapur (Sanctioned)

Chandrapur

7.2375

Chandrapur

2.

Chandrapur (Addl.Area)

Proposed

Surrounding the chanda and within extened limit of Chandrapur

44.70

Chandrapur

3.

Rajura

Chandrapur- Asifabad Road 32km. South from Cha'pur

2.93

Rajura

4.

a.      Ballarpur

( Sanctioned)

b. Ballarpur (Addl.Area)

Chandrapur-Allapalli Road 16km & south from Chandrapur

Adjoining Ballarpur

9.0652

7.45

Ballarpur

Ballarpur

5.

Warora (Sanctioned)

45km. from Chandrapur

7.9359

Warora

6.

Mul ( proposed)

43.45km. from Chandrapur on Ch. - Gadchiroli H.W. No.2

23.1562

Mul

7.

Bramhapuri (proposed)

123.91km. from Chandrapur to the North-West

21.92

Bramhapuri

8. 

New Chandrapur

(proposed)

7km. from Chandrapur Nagpur road . Area includedd MS Padoli (part), Khuta (part)

13.92

Chandrapur

 RISK ASSESSMENT AND VULNERABILITY ANALYSIS

Economic, Occupational, Social and Educational Profile of the Population

·         Physical feature and land use pattern of the district indicate that agriculture is the main activity in the district. The total agriculture area is 4810 Sq. kms. i.e. 46.05 % of the total area of the district.

·         Out of the total area, sown area is 5,18196 hectors barren and cultivable land 76004 HRS. and culturable waste land is 230 sq.kms.

·         Paddy, Cotton, Jwar and Soybean are the main crops in the district.34.33 % of the toptal area I under forestcover

·         The percentage of urban & rural population is 28.04 % & 71.96 % respecticvely.Scheduled Castes and Scheduled Tribes population accounts for 16.78 % and 19.70 % respectively.

·         The total area under industrial use accounts for 32.34 sq.km. 

·         There are 7 Urban centres and 13 major rural centres. 6.26  % of the population lives in the slums and 13.36 % of the population is below poverty line.

·         Total work-force in 4 existing industrial estates is just 2071 but there are major industrial like coal mines. Thermal power station, Cement Factories, Paper mill etc. which are situated outside the industrial area where work force is about 30,000. There is influx of workers from other states particularly in Coal Mines. Seasonal migration is temporary phenomenan lasting for two-three months. The workers mostly come from Madhya Pradesh, Andhra Pradesh, Orissa and Bihar.

·         There are two historical centres and 16 religious centres where there is influx of tourists in particular season.

·         The overall literacy percent age of the  district is 59.41 %

Building Codes Implementation

·         Though the building codes have been preseribed by the P.W.D. for various areas but those are not being strictly implemented. It is necessary to implement the building codes in Flood Prone area, so that, the damage due to flood is minimised. Earthquake prone building norms need to be ingroduce in towns & villages by imparting training to town engineers & architects.  

Land Use Regulation And Zoning      

·         The Development Plan has  been proposed for all the Urban areas and periferial areas. There is Regional Plan prepared for Chandrapur and Ballarpur Towns. In this Development Plan areas have been distributed amongst various zonessuch as residential, commercial & industrial. Some areas have been kept reserved for parks and guardens and

open spaces. The Local authorities are supposed to imploement the Development Plan. However, it is seen that there are Zoning violation particularly in Chandrapur & Ballarpur towns. In rural area, there is no effective machinary for enforcing zoning regulations.

·         The flood prone area has been divided into Blue zone and Red xone. The house existing in Blue zones are required to be shifted since the damage is more in blue zone due to floods. Government will have to provide special funds for this purpose to shift population from blue zone in a phased manner.

·         The Resettlement Plan for the persons living in Blue zone area is required to be prepared and residents from blue zones have to be shifted

·         No special planning for earthquake prone area has been made. Since no such specific area has been indnetified. However with Jabalpur and Latur earthquake in recent post, earthquake prepared measures will have to be taken by the district administration. Detailed vulnerability and mitigation studies need to be undertaken by experts to advice district administration in taking precentionary measures. Government may appoint experts committee in this regard.

Disaster specific proneness

Floods 

The district can be divided in to two basin areas i.e. Wardha river basin and Wainganga river basin. These are the two main rivers.

Apart from Wardha and Waingang rivers, Uma, Andhari, Irai, Penganga rivers also get flooded sometimes damaging crops. They are generally prone to flash floods either due to heavy downpour or back water of bigger rivers.

There is no completed major irrigation project in the district. There are 7 medium and 29 minor irrigation completed projects in the district.One major,  2 medium and 12 minor irrigation projects which all surveyed and work may start soon. There are 5 medium and 3 minor irriguation projects which all surveyed and work may start soon. Completed dams help in mitigation of flash floods in the downstream region.

Water shed management schemes undertaken by agriculture department have contributed a lot in reducing frequency and intensity of floods. As on today 324 villages have been covered under water shed management programmes.

17.10 % population lives in flood prone area. Building code regulation are not observed in flood prone areas.

The houses in blue-zone need to be shifted to avoid recurring loss of lifes properly. If necessary, legislation should be enacted to shift such people by using force and then the entire blue zone area should be usedfor plantation of trees of appropriate species.\

During last 30 years, the district experienced 12 major floods  causing  47 deaths and total loss of Rs. 3700 lacs. Amount spent on relief and rehabilitation works in last ten years Rs. 1083.84 lacs. 

There were major floods in Wainganga river in the year 1962, 1979, 1986, 1991 and two floods in 1994. The worst flood was of 1994. Similarly Wardha river was flooded twelve times in last 30 years while Uma, Irai and Andhari river experienced heavy flood six times in 30 years. In 1994, heavy damages were caused to standing crop along Wainganga river.

In August 1986, heavy floods to Irai, Uma & Andhari river had created havoc. Chandrapur town was cut off from other part of the district & State by road & rail for 3 days. Helicopter of Airforce was used to drop food packets in maroones villages. About five thousand people were shifted to temporary shetters where they were given food by NGOs & cashdoless and gratitous relief by Government.

In case of heavy floods in Wainganga, Collector Balaghat in Madhya Pardesh and Collector Bhandara issue advance warning. Central Water Commission officers from Balaghat and Bhandara also send timely warning of heavy floods.

Flood control plan of each flood prone village is prepared and discussed with village level functioner and prominent villagers before mansoon to creat awareness. Crop insurance scheme needs to be introduced.

Case study on major diaster episode of 1994 flood in the district is given in the Annexure.

Based on the occurance of past floods, the main Flood Prone Areas have been identified as under :

Sr.

No

Name of the river

Flooding frequency over 30 year

Location and extent of area inumdated (worst case in km²)

Corrusponding flood damage in Rs.

Remarks

1.

Wainganga

river

6 times

Worst 1994 Bramhapuri, Nagbhid & sindewahi Talukas

52.17 sq.km.

Rs. 2612.44 lacks

There were two flood, once in July 1994, second time in Sept. 1997

2

Wardha river

12 times

1986 flood Chandrapur, Rajura & Gondapiri talukas 49 sq. km.

Rs. 430.61 lacks

3

Irai river

6 times

Worst case 1986 Chandrapur town 15 sq.km.

Rs. 50.13 lacks

4

Uma river

6 times

Worst case 1986 1.34 sq.km.

Rs. 8.00 lacks

5

Andhari river

6 times

Worse case 1986 0.90 sq.km.

Rs. 5.00 lacks

List of Flood Prone Villages

Sr.No

Name of Taluka

Name of River Nalla

Flood Afected Village

Distance from Dist.HQ

Approach

1.

Rajura

Sondo Nalla

Nalla

Wardha River

Sondo

Paoni

Kolgaon

Sasti

14 km.

20 km.

06 km.

05 km.

By Road

Rajura Gadchandur Road

2

Korpana

--

--

--

--

3

Sawali

Wainganga River

Akapur

Kadholi

Nimgaon

Dabgaon Maus

Sirsimal

Usegaon

45 km.

45 km.

22 km.

20 km.

17 km.

10 km.

By Road

4

Sindewahi

Uma River

Kalamgaon

Viroha

Sir Konda

Sarandi

Jamsala

10 km.

09 km.

25 km.

22 km.

15 km.

By Road

5

Nagbhid

--

--

--

--

6

Chimur

--

--

--

--

7

Brahampuri

Wainganga River

Ayal Tukum

Parudgaon

Rammochan

Betala

Kolari

Ruyad

Dewulgaon

Belgaon

Dighori

Bhaleshwar

Pimpalgaon

--

By Road

8

Mul

Wainganga River

Korambi

32 km.

Mul Borchandali Juna Surla Road

9

Gondpipari

Andhari River

--do--

--do--

--do--

Wainganga River

--do--

--do--

--do--

Wardha River

--do--

Dhaba Nalla

Bhimani

Taroda

Chak Ballarpur

Pombhurna

Tok

Gangapur

Kultha

Dhanora

Saknur

Hiwara

Dhaba

10

Bhadrawati

Sir River

--do--

Wardha River

--do--

--do--

--do--

--do--

--do--

--do--

--do--

--do--

Kondha Nalla

--do--

Irai River

--do--

Shivaji Nagar

Majari

Mangaon

Patala

Thorana

Kunada

Chargaon

Pipari

Kochi

Kawadi

Palasgaon

Kondha

Chalbardi

Charwagharapur

Parodhi

11

Warora

Dewal Nalla

Pathra Nalla

--do--

Dewalnalla

--do--

Irai River

Nalla

Wardha River

--do--

--do--

--do--

--do--

--do--

--do--

--do--

--do--

Wana River

Wardha River

--do--

Khapari

Khambada

Kosarsar

Jamani Buj.

Takali

Borgaon kh.

Khemjai

Ekona

Ashti

Tulana

Karanji

Charakhati

Dahegaon

Soit

Kohapara

Dindoda

Bambarda

Niljai

Amadi

3 km.

3 km.

--

4 km.

8 km.

7 km.

7 km.

8 km.

6 km.

5 km.

5 km.

10 km.

10 km.

5 km.

7 km.

6 km.

4 km.

8 km

5 km..

Road Not Available

--do--

Jamni-Tembhu Road

No.

No.

No.

Road

Road

Road

Road

12

Chandrapur

Wardha River

--do--

Irai River

--do--

--do--

--do--

Belsani

Chandur

Wadholi

Chicgoli

Paili-Bhatal

Ghugus

28 km.

27 km.

15 km.

17 km.

16 km.

28 km.

Road

Earthquakes

Except for minor seismic activity, no earthquake had occurred in Chandrapur district. The Deccan Plateau was considered to be seismically stable zone. Chandrapur district falls in seismic zone II of the ISI classification and was supposed to be least prone to seismic activity till April 2nd of 1997 when an earthquake occurred with epicentre in Chandrapur district. In view of this, there is need for rezoining and considering parts of Deccan Plateau with active faults as prone to geoseismic hazards.

Detailed study for earthquake hazard for the district has become necessary due to the incident of 2nd April 1997. Government may constitute Technical committee for detailed study and suggest measures to be undertaken by Distt. Administration.

Industrial and Chemical Accidents

Some of the mojor industries in the district are dealing with petro-chemical products and Chlorine which are considered to be vulnerable to both fires and chemical accidents.

·                     The following units have been identified as hazardous industries:

Name of Industry

Hazardous Chemical

1

Ballarpur Industries Ltd. Ballarpur, Distt., Chandrapur

Chlorine

2

Gaurao Paper Mills Hardoli, Tah Brahmapuri

--do--

3

Fakri Ice Factory Chandrapur

Amonia

4

Fatemi Ice Factory Chandrapur

Amonia

Chemical

5

Hindusthan Pet. Corpo. Ltd. MIDC, Chandrapur L.P.

 L.P. Gas

6

Rashmi Gases Pvt. Ltd. MIDC Chandrapur

--do--

7

Shrivatav Hi-Tech Pro Oil Complex Tadali

Hexane

8

Multi Organics Ltd. MIDC Chandrapur

Acid

9

Abhideep Chemical Pvt. :Ltd. MIDC Chandrapur

--do--

10

Pyush Chemical Industries Co. Operative Estate, Chandrapur

--do--

11

Chrome Chemical Industries Co operative Estate Chandrapur

--do--

12

Chanda Chemical Industries Co Operative Estate Chandrapur

--do--

13

    Chemicals, MIDC Road Chandrapur

--do--

14

Ordance Factory Chanda

--do--

8.72 % o the population live in the proximity of major chemical plants.

During last 10 years, there have been 5673 chemical or industrial accidents resulting in 47 deaths. Expenditure incurred on relief and compensation these episodes is Rs. 35.25 lacs.

Fire

During last 15 years, there have been instances of 1580 fires in this District.

1.                  Fire to collon in APMC yard or Ginning factory

2.                  Fire in forest areas

3.                  Fire to residential house and cattle sheds in rural area.

4.                  Fire to crops harvested and stored in a field

5.                  Fire due to stove burst.

It is necessary to compel APMC and ginning factory to have their own fire fighting equipments with trained personnel.

As regards fire in forest areas, Government of Maharashtra, Department of Forest has made adequate arrangement by providing sophisticted equipments, machinery and trained staff. There is a separate division to this wing of the department.

As regards domestic fires in rural areas, thatched roofs should be replaced by Manglore tile roofs to minimise instances of fire to such houses.

All L.P.G. agencies should rigidly follow safey norms to avoid accidents by gas-cylinder blast. Godowns to store gas-cylinders should be properly built and located away from residential area

Road Accidents

During last 14 years, there have been 1517 road accidents, taking toll of 1736 human and causing loss of property to the tune of 24.8 lac.

There are 157 villages & 7 towns along the major road, which are accident prone.

Epidemic

In last 15 years epidemic occurred nine times at 208 places resuting in 281 deaths. Expenditure incurred on this is Rs. 17.70 lacs.

Most of the incidences are due to contaminated water and polluted sources of drinking water.

Disaster Probability

According to the District Administration, the probability of disaster occurrence and the possible intensity of disasters, based  on the earlier history is given below.

Damage

Earthquake

Floods

Cyclones

Epidemics

Industrial & Chemical Accidents

Fires

Road

Accidents

Loss of Lives

Low

Medium

Low

Medium

Low

Medium

Medium

Injuries

Medium

Low

Low

Low

Low

Medium

Medium

Damage to and Destruction of Property

Low

Medium

Low

Low

Low

Medium

Medium

Damage to cattle and livestock

Low

Medium

Low

Low

Low

Low

Low

Damage to subsistence and crops

Low

Medium

Low

Low

Low

Low

Low

Disruption of life style

Medium

Medium

Low

Low

Low

Low

Medium

Disruption of community life

Medium

Medium

Low

Medium

Low

Low

Medium

Loss of Livelihood

Low

Medium

Low

Low

Low

Low

Low

Discription of service

Medium

High

Low

Low

Low

Medium

Low

Damage to infrastructure and / or discruption of department system

Medium

High

Low

Low

Low

Medium

Medium

Impact on National Economy

Medium

High

Low

Medium

Medium

Medium

Low

Social and Psychological after-effects

Medium

High

Low

Medium

Medium

Medium

Low

Specifice Vulnerability of System and Service to Disaster Events

Specific Vulnerability

Vulnerable to

Earthquakes

Floods

Cyclones

Epidemics

Fires

Road

Accidents

Industrial & Chemical Accidents

Transport Systems

( road network)

Yes

Yes

No

No

No

Yes

Yes

Transport systems

(rail network)

Yes

Yes

Yes

No

No

No

No

Power supply

Yes

Yes

Yes

No

No

Yes

No

Water supply

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

No

No

Yes

Yes

No

No

No

No

No

Hospitals

Yes

Yes

No

Yes

Yes

No

No

Food stocks

And supplies

Yes

Yes

Yes

No

No

Yes

No

Communication systems

(tele communication)

Yes

Yes

Yes

No

No

Yes

No

Health Service

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Laws & Order

Yes

Yes

No

No

No

Yes

Yes

Ranking and Probability of Disaster Episodes in the District

Event

Ranking of events in terms of past occurence

Probability of future occurrence

High

Medium

Low

Earthquake

Low

--

--

Yes

Floods

High

--

Yes

--

Cyclones

Low

--

--

Yes

Epidemics

Low

--

--

Yes

Industrial & Chemical Accidents

Low

--

--

Yes

Fires

Medium

--

Yes

--

Road Accidents

Medium

--

Yes

--

ANNEXURE I Information on Industrial Estates      

I  Co Operative Industrial Estate, Chandrapur

Name of the Industrial Estate

-

Chandrapur coperative Industrial Estate,

Location in the form of an address

-

Mul road, near Adarsh Petrol Pump, Chandrapur

Number of Industries in the estate

-

81

Number of major hazardous and polluting Industries

-

9

Total work foce in the Industries

-

800

II - Industrial Estate, Chandrapur

Name of the Industrial Estate

-

Chandrapur Industrial Estate

Location in the form of an address

-

At village Chichala Chandrapur-Ghugus Road Tq.& Distt.Chandrapur

Number of Industries in the Estate

-

83

Number of major hazardous and polluting Industries

-

7

Total work force in the Industries

-

1026

III - Industrial Estate, Ghugus

Name of the Industrial Estate

-

Industrial Estate Ghugus

Location in the form of an address

-

At & Post GhugusDistt.Chandrapur

Number of Industries in the Estate

-

1

Number of major hazardous and polluting Industries

-

NIL

Total work force in the Industries

-

240

IV - Industrial Estate, Rajura

Name of the Industrial Estate

-

 Industrial Estate Rajura

Location in the form of an address

-

Near Railway, Manikgarh Rajura

Number of Industries in the Estate

-

1

Number of major hazardous and polluting Industries

-

--

Total work force in the Industries

-

5

ANNEXURE – II  Fact sheets of Hazardous Industries

Fact Sheet 1

1.         Factory Identify                     :Ballarpur Industries Ltd. , Ballarpur

            Unit Address                           :Ballarpur Paper Mills - P.O. 442 901

2.                  Contract Personnel from the Factory :

1.                  Mr. D. Sen Gupta, Manager-Chem, Complex

2.                  Mr. S.S. Pal, Chief Engineer.

3.                  Mr. G.K. Sinha, Factory Manager

3.         Principal Activity :

Manufacturing of Paper, Caustic Soda, Chlorine and Hydrochoric Acid with storage, loading and unloading faciltities.

4.         Table Showing Maxium Inventoryof Hazardous Chemicals in MT.                              

Sr.

Name of Chemical

Maximum - inventory in MT in Storage

Method of Storage

Inventory in Processing System

1.

Chlorine

90

M.S. Tanks Cylinder

Tonners

Nil

1.8

2.

Sulphuric Acid

55

M.S. Tanks

7

3.

Caustic Soda

460

2 M.S. Tanks

9

4.

Hydrochloric Acid

100

FRP Tanks

28

5. Consequence of major Hazards from Storage :

I .Chlorine :    Leakage from storge tanks or cylinder tonners cause spreading of toxic gas in the factory and in the adjloining areas outside factory.

 II. Sulphurice Acid : In the event of the collapse or leakage of the storage tanks, this can emit highly toxic fumes in the contact with moisture or water, affecting the workers and people in the surrounding areas. Liquid contact can cause during injury to people.

III. Caustic Soda : In the event of the collaps or leakage of the storage tanks, this cancause during injury to the surrounding with direct contact of the liquid.

IV. Hydrolic Acid : In the event of the collaps or leakage of the storage tanks, this emits highly irritating and corrosive fumes, affecting the wakers and people in surroundings areas.

6.                  Consequence of Major Hazards from Processing:

I.                     In the processing stage, chlorine gas may escape through pipes and equipements or absorption system in the event of failure of the same. In the chlorination stage in pulp mills, chlorine gas can escape due to failure of pipe and flang bints or velves and fittings or from the pulp system due to excess chlorination or failure of pump.

II.                   Sulphuric Acid which is used for drying wet chlorine gas, can came out of the system due to failure of pipes, fittings and valves etc.

III          Caustic Soda can come out of the system due to failure of pipes, fitting and valves etc.

IV         Synthesis of Hydrochloric Acid is an exothermic reaction, can cause explosion and fire due to explosive mixture formation of C12 and H2 gases passing out unreacted from the furnace.

7.                  Physical Ranges of Consequense (Propagation):

Storage                                                                      Manufacturing

( Hazards as per S.No.5)                                            (Hazards as per S.No.6)

I.                     Leakages from chlorine Tonners of storage

Tanks is limited to factory area.

-                      Bursting of one chlorine tunner at 350 c can

Spread of 200 mtrs. With 35 ppm. C12 in 4

Minutes with 4.44 M/Sec. Wine velocity.

-                      Due to rupture of one chlorine storage tank of 50

Ts cap. At 30 C can spread chlorine to 3 km. in a

Span of 800 mtrs. With 35 ppm. C12 in a 18 mtrs.

With 4.44  M/sec. Wind velocity.

II           Limited to factory                                                        II. Limited to plant Section

III          Limited to plant                                                            III. Limited to plant Section

                                                                                                IV  Limited to factory

8.                  Emergency actions within 5 (five) minutes of occurrence:

Persons responsible

A.         Notify Police                                                    Production Manager/Dy.Manager

            (Emergency Phone) 40682 (O)

                                             40684 ®

B.                 Notify Fire Brigade

(Emergency Phone) 40542                            --do--

C.        Notify Ambulance Service                               --do--

            (Emergency Phone) 40200               

D         Notify Evacuation Squad

(Emgerency Phone) 40221                            --do--

E.                 Broadcast to Community

(Emgerency Phone) 40262                            A.M. (Security)

                                             40282

9.                  Emergency actions within 15 (fifteen) minutes of occurance :

I.                     Start plugging chlorine leakage by using emergency safey kit and self contained compressed air breathing apparatus.

II           Stop the affected plans and other plants

III          Stop Electric supply in case of fire

IV         Escape out workers and other people except those trained for emergency operations.

V          Fight fire with existing facilities. Remove flammable and combustible materials from adjoining fire affected areas.

VI         In case of fire near Chlorine Cylinders, start removing filled chlorine cylinders to safe place away from fire affected area opposite to wine direction.

10.              Emergency Facilities/Action required :

Fire Fighting Facilities :

1.                  Suffiiient No. of fire engines with water.

2.                  Water Gog Nozzeles.

3.                  DCP & CO2 Extinguishers.

4.                  Self Breathing Apparatus

5.                  Toxic Gases Mask

6.                  Fire Proof Suits.

Action Required :

1.                  Fighting fire

2.                  Prevent spriding of fire to hazards chemicals storage areas

3.                  Prevent spreading of fire to nearby flammable & combustible materials.

4.                  Reduce effect of toxic fules if any in the area by suitable methods.

5.                  Rescue the workers trapped in work areas.

Police :

1.                  Evacuation of workers and people in the nearby areas to safer place.

2.                  Cordoning off the areas to prevent entry of people to the affected protion

3.                  Protection of property and to keep constant vigilance to keep the affected plant and machinery undisturbed till enquires.

Medicals Services :

Antidotes for Chlorine. HCL & H2So4 fumes etc. medical ixygen cylinders, medicines for fire burns and acid/alkali burns, courgh syrups for chlorine affected persons, boric acid solution for eye wash etc.

Action Required :

First-Aid and treatment of affected persons.

Response Time :

Immediate response of all the service for all hazards is necessary.

Other Information

1.      During fire fighting and other emergency operations, ensure that water does not come in contact with Sulphuric acid, neutralise acids by Na2 Co2 (Soda ash) and them mop up with plenty of water.

2.      Do not use water to fight electric fire.

3.      Do not put water on chlorine leaking spot.

4.      In case, the chlorine leakage from tonners can not be plugged, pass chlorine in Caustic Soda solution.

5.      In case of chlorine and HCL acid leakage as persons to move opposite side ir at right angle to wind direction and use a pad of wet cloth against nose if suffisient gas masks are not available for all.

6.      Keep emergency Safety kit and spares ready for use.

List of safety aplliances for chlorine leakage handling :

Sr.No

Description of Equipments

Available Nos.

1

Positive presoure compressed Airhoods ( plus pressure suit type B-6) kept at different stations

6

2

Self-contained Oxygen Breathing Apparatus

2

3

Self-contained compressed Air Breathing Apparatus

1

4

Self-contained compressed Air Breathing Apparatus sufficient for 45 minutes

1

5

Air/Oxygen resuscitator for supplying iar/oxygen to chlorine affected perosns (manual type )

2

6

Continuous auto-Oxygen feeding apparatus ( resuscitator). Pneupack Medel No.II for supplying oxygen to chlorine affected persons.

1

7

Portable medical oxygen cylinder to be used by chlorine affected persons

2

8

Fresh Air, positive pressure, hood with blower ( hand operated ) & Hose arrangement for supplying fresh air from area away leak spot.

1

9

Cartidge type gas filters for used by workmen in various sections in mild chlorine gas atmosphere.

25

10

Chlorine gas detectors, Pawalt make USA for detecting chlorine and given alarm in the rank of 1-3 PPM

2

11

Emergency safety kit all spare devices and spares for arresting all kinds of leakages for chlorine cylinders

1


Fact Sheet 2

1

Factory Identity Address

:

Gaurav Paper Mills

Vill & Post _ Hardoli Tah - Brahmapuri Distt. - Chandrapur M.S. Pin 441 206

2

Contact Personnel from the Factory

:

Mr. C.K. V. Thampy General Manager (works)

Gaurav Paper Mill

Res. Ph. No. 84 & 85 Ext. 216

Mr. Gopesh Mathur

Production  Manager Gaurav Paper Mill

Res. Ph. No. 84 & 85 Ext. 214

Mr. S.K. Kawade

Asstt. Manager ( P & A) Gaurav Paper Mill

Res.Ph. No. 84 & 85

Ext. 215

3

Principal Activity

:

Manufacture of Wrinting and Printing paper

4

Hazardous Chemicals

:

Chlorine

5

Maximum Inventory of Hazardous Chemical in Tonnes

:

9.8 Tonnes ( stores in Tonners)

6

Consequences of major hazads from storage

:

Leakage from Tonners cause spreading of toxic gases in the factory and in the adjoining area outside factory.

7

Consequences of major hazardous from processing

:

In the chlorinationt process chlorine gas can escape out

8

Physical range of consequences

( propagation)

 

Storage

Processing

Leakage of chlirine can spread up to 1 km.

Limited to factory

9.

Emgerency Actions Within Five Minitues of Occurance

:

Person Responsible

a)

Notify Police

( Emergency Phone )

:

Mr. C.K. V. Thampy

Mr. S.C. Kawade

Asstt.Manager ( P & A ) 

b)

Notify fire brigade

(Emgerency Phone)

:

Mr. C.K. V. Thampy

General Manager (works)

Mr. S.C. Kawade

Asstt. Manager ( P & A )

C)

Notify Evacuational Squad

(Emergency Phone)

:

Mr. C.K. V. Thampy

General Manager (works)

Mr. S.C. Kawade

Asstt. Manager ( P & A )

 

d)

Broadcast to Community

(Emgerency Phone)

:

Mr. Gopal Mathur

Prod. Manager

10

Emergency Action Within 15 ( fifteen) Minutes of Occurrence

1.

2.

Start plugging chlorine leakage by using emergency kit and breathing apparatus

Escape outworkers except the trained for emergency operations

11

Emergency facilities/action required

1.

2.

Self breathing apparatus

Toxic gas masks

Action Required :

1.                  Reduce effect o ftoxic fumes in the areas by suitable methods.

2.                  Rescue of works trapped in work rooms.

Police :

1.                  Exacuation of workers and people in the nearly areas to safer place.

2.                  Cardoning off the areas to prevent entry of people to the affected portions.

3.                  Protection of property and to kept constant vigilance to keep the affected plant and machinery undisurbed till enquires.

Medical Services :

1.                  Antidotes for chlorine

Medicines for fire burns.

Action Required :

1.                  Firs-Aid and treatment of affected persons.

Response Time

Immidiate response of all the services for all hazards is necessary.

Other  Information :

1.                  In case the chlorine leakage can not be plugged pass chlorine in Caustic Soda Solution or Lime Solution.

Fact Sheet 3

1.

Factory Identity

Location Coordinates

:

M/S Hindustan Petrolium Corpn. Ltd.

L.P.G. Bottling Plant, B-32, MIDC, Chandrapur

MIDC, Chandrapur

2.

Contach Personnal From the Factory

:

Mr. A.R.K. Babu Plant Manager

Ph.no. - 3289 & 9MIDC)

Mr. A.B. Bangde

Safety Officer

Ph. No. 368 ( MIDC)

3

Principal Activity Bottling Cylinders by L.P.G. &  storage of LPG Vessels.

4

Hazards Chemicals

Liquified Petrolium Gas

5

Max. Inventory in Tonnes of the storage

:

l.p.g. - 450 Mt.

6

Inventory in Tonnes in processing system

:

L.P.G. - MT

7

Consequence of major hazards from storage

:

1.      Since LPG is highly inflammable, it storage can cause explosion is case of rise in temprature. This can be tackled by colling  vessels by operating sprinkeler. Quartizeirf bulbs are provided to start fire engines for sprinklers operation.

2.      Gas detection system is provided is detect any leakage.

8.

Consequence of Major Hazards from processing

:

1.From main control pannel, emergency Processing shutdown will be done. Fire can be tackled by effective fire fighting system.

9

Physical range of consequences Propagation

:

Storage/Manufacturing

1.      Fire ( Localised area)

2.      Explosion-area about 200 mtr.diamiter

10

Emergency  Action Within Five Minutes

a) Notify Police

    (emergency Phone 2201)

    (Police Control Room 2201)

b) Notify Fire Brigade

(Emergency Phone 3263)

c)  Notify E.M.E. A.M.V. Service

    (Emergency Phone 2231)

d)  Notify Evacuational Squad

    (Emergency Phone 368)

e)  Broadcast to Community

:

Person Responsible

Mr. S.R. Borde/V.B. Lokhande

Mr. S.R. Borde/ V.B. Lokhande

Mr. S.R. Borde / V.B. Lokhande

Mr. R.L. Jadhav, Mr. P.N. Dhote

Mr. A.L. Kureshi, MR. B.V. Sontakke

Mr. P.K. Thekham, Mr. S.C. Dhopte,

Mr. D.N. Hore, Mr. G.A. Khobragade 

Not Applicable

11

Emergency Action within 15 minutes

Organise-situation Control by fire minutes of occurances fighting evacuation of casualties first-aid removal to hospital reassuring-comforting-casualities bring normalicy.

12

Emergency Facilities

Emergency Facility Fire Fighting

Emergency Facilities Action

:

:

We have emergency facilities such as required by Incident Controller on site communication facility, for fire road. Mutual assistance by Bilt has been sought in case of emergency.

Fire fighting team will immidiately Action Required go in to action with available fire fighting facilities as per fire organisation chart. Assistance to be sought from fire brigade of Chandrapur, of MSEB and Bilt.

Help cordon area-remove casulties Required Police any-Broadcast Local Police, Necessary Keep law and order. 

13

Response Time Minutes

Fire fighting

Police

Medical

:

Total 30 Minutes

25 Minutes

25 Minutes

25 Minutes

14

Other Information

:

We hane a grid network of fire fighting system such as hydrants monitors, sprinklers, fire extinguishers in all sheds and storage areas we have trained fire fighting team, rescue team and Auxilliary team to deal with any emergency. We have been giving regular training to all employees in fire-fighting Disaster control plan, first-aid.

Fact Sheet  4

1.         Factory Identity                     :           Solano Chemical Pvt. Ltd.,

                                                                        E-56 MIDC, Chandrapur

2.         Contact Personnel From     :           1. Mr. LS.Mahajan,

                                                                        Managing Director

                                                                        2. Dr. D.L. Bhure

3.         Principal Activity                   :           Manufacturing of Bleaching Powder

4. Table showing maximum inventory of hazardous chemicals in cylinder

Sr.No.

Name of chemicals

Maximum Inventory in Cylinder storage

Method of storage

Inventory in processing system

1

Chlorine

 5 cylinder

Cylinder

cylinder

5. Consequences of major hazard from storage :

Chlorine – Leakage from storage tanks or cylinder tonners cause spreading of toxic gas in the factory and in the adjoining areas outside factory.

6.         Consequences from major hazards from processing :

In the processing stage chlorine gas may escape through pipes flange joints or valves and fitting and equipments or absorption system in the event of failure of the same.

7.      Physical Range of Consequences ( propagation) :

Storage                                                          Manufacturing

            ( hazards as per S.NO.5)                                  ( hazards as per S.NO. 6)

Leakage from Chlorine                                                      Limited to Factory

together confined upto 1km.

8.      Emergency Action Within 5 (five) minutes of Occurance :

a)      Notify Police (2201 Phone) Director/Supervisor Shri Bhure D.L.

b)      Notify Fire Brigade (3263 Phone) Director/Supervisor

c)      Notify Amb. Service (2213 Phone)

9.      Emergency Action Within 15 Minutes of occurance :

1.                  Start plugging chlorine leakage by using emergency safety kit.

2.                  Stop the machine

3.                  Stop electric supply in case of fire.

10.  Emergency Facilities : Action required by incident controller on site :

1.                  Water fog nozzles

2.                  Toxic gases masks

Emergency facilities fire fighting/action required :

1.                  fire fighting

2.                  Prevent spreading of fire of hazardous chemicals storage.

3.                  Reduce effect of toxic fumes if any in the areas by suitable meytods.

4.                  Remove the workers trapped in work area.

Medical Services :

Antidotes for chlorine, medical oxygen chlinders, Medicine for fire furns, cough syrups for chlorine affected persons etc.

Actions Required :

Firs-Aid and  treatment of affected persons.

11.  Response time :

Immidiate response of all the servises for all hazards is necessary.

12.  Other information :

1.                  Do not use water to fight electric fire.

2.                  Do not put water on chlorine leaking spot.

3.                  In case not chlorine leakage as persons to move opposite side or at right angle to wine direction and use a pad of wet cloth against nose if sufficient gas masks are not available for all.

13.  Personal Protective Equipment  available

emergency kit-1.

Self contained breathing apparatus – 1

Fact Sheet 5

1

Factory Identity

Location Coordinates

:

M/S Hindustan Petrolium Corpn. Ltd.

L.P.G. Bottling Plant, B-32, MIDC, Chandrapur

MIDC, Chandrapur

2

Contact Personnal from the Factory

:

Mr. A.R.K. Babu Plant Manager,

Ph. No. 3289 & ( MIDC)

Mr. A.B. Bangde,

Safety Officer

Ph.n. – 368 ( MIDC)

3

Principal Activity

Bottling Cylinders of L.P.G. & storage of LPG Vessels

4

Hazardous Chemicals

:

1. Liquified Petrolium Gas

5

Max. Inventory in Tonnes of the storage

:

L.P.G. – 450 Mt.

6

Inventory in Tonnes in processing system

:

L.P.G. – MT.

7

Consequence of major hazards from storage

2. Gas detection systems is provided detect any leakage.

:

1.      Since LPG is highly inflammable, it storage. Can cause explosion is case of rise in temprature. This can be tackled by cooling vessels by operating sprinkeler. Quartzeirf bulbs are provided to start fire engines for sprinklers operation.

8.

Consequence of Major Hazards from processing

:

1. From men  control pannel, emergency Processing shutdown will be done. Fire can be tackled by effective fire fighting syste.

9

Physical range of consequences

:

Storage/Manufacturing Propagation

1.      Fire (Localised area)

2.      Explosion-area about 200 mtr. Diamiter

10

Emergency Action Within Five Minutes

a.      Notify Police

b.      Notify Fire Brigade

c.      Notify E.M.E. A.M.V. Service

d)      Notify Evacuational Squad

e)  Broadcast to Community

 

:

:

Person Responsible ( emergency  Phone 2201) Mr. S.R. Borde/V.B. Lokhande)

(Police Control Room 2201)

Mr. S.R. Borde/V.B. Lokhande

 (Emgerency Phone 3263)

Mr. S.R. Borde/V.B. Lokhande (Emergency Phone2231)

Mr. R.L. Jadhav, Mr. P.N. Dhote

(Emergency Phone 368)

Mr. A.L. Kureshi

Mr. B.V. Sontakke

Mr. D.N. Hore

Mr. G.A. Khobragade

Not Applicable 

11

Emergency Action within 15 minutes

:

Organise-situation Control by fire minutes of occurances fighting evacuation of casualties first-aid removal to hospital reassuring-comforting-casualities bring normalicy.

12

Emergency Facilities Action

:

We have emergency facilities such as Required by Incident Controller communication facility, for fire on Site fighting. Hospitals fire road Mutual assistance by bilt has been sought in case of emergency.

b.Emergency Facility Fire Fightings

:

Fire fighting team will immidiately Action Required go in to action with available fire fighting facilities as per fire organisation chart. Assistance to be sought from fire brigade of Chandrapur, of MSEB and Bilt.

Help cordon area-remove casulties Required Police any-Broadcast Local Police, Necessary Keep law and order

13

Response Time

Fire fighting

Police

Medical

:

Total 30 Minutes

25 Minutes

25 Minutes

25 Minutes

14

Other Information

:

We hane a grid network of fire fighting system such as hydrants monitors, sprinklers, fire extinguis-hers in all sheds and storage areas we have trained fire fighting team, rescue team and Auxilliary team to deal with any emergency. We have been giving regular training to all employees in fire-fighting Disaster control plan. First-aid

Annexure – III Disaster Episodes in the District

Type of  Episode – Flood ( July & September 1994 )

Location – Bramhapuri Tq., Sindewahi Tq. Nagbhid Tq., Warora, Bhadrawati

Date – July & September 1994

Reasons assigned for the event – Heavy flood to wardha river in July 1994 and Wainganga river in September 94

Warning system used – Wireless

Community response to warning system – good & Positive

Administrative response to warning system – God

Assessment of administrative preparedness. – Administration was well prepared

Extent of damages

No.  of lives lost :         18

Financial Assistance given to next of kin : Rs. 2.50 lacs

Loss of cattles :          190

Loss in Rupees :         4.02 lacs

Crop damage : Damage to the crops and land was assessed by field to field survey jointly undertaken by the Talaths, Gramsevaks and agricultural assistants. Financial assistance given to the farmers at the rate of Rs. 1000 Per hector upto 2 hectors for resowing:

Sr.No

Name of the Crop

Area of Crop affected

Loss in Rs.

1

Paddy

3907.88 Hector

2

Cotton

5915.46 Hector

3

Soyabean

11228.83 Hector

4

Jawar

1022.74 Hector

5

Tur

1779.37 Hector

6

Other Crops

486.89 Hector

Total

24341.17 Hector

Rs. 616 lakhs

 Land Damages :

a)      Land damages : 5217.26 hectors

b)      Loss in Rupees : 60.11 lacs.

c)      Seed distributed : 3802  quintals

d)      Value of seed distributed : 41.37 lacs

Damage to houses :

No. of family affected

House damages

Fully collapsed

Loss in Rs.

Partly Affected

Loss in Rs.

1858

148.131 lacs

1827

75.91 lacs

Gratituous relief

Number of families

Number of Persons

Gratituous relief paid

3105

15246

52.57 lacs

Damage to infrastructure

Sr. No.

Details of infrastructure

Loss in Rs.

1

P.W.D.

a)      Road Length of 957 kms

b)      Damage to Building and Bridges.

491.04 lacs

655.60 lacs

2

Irrigation Department

Damage to Irrigation dams, MI tanks,

Village tanks lift irrigation scheme etc. 32 works

144.19 lacs

3

M.S.E.B.

In 111 Villages transmission line was damaged

23.45 lacs

4

Zilla Parishad

Damage to Z.P. Buildings & bridges

36.29 lacs

5

Environmental Engineering

Damage to Water Supply scheme and pumps, borewells etc.                               147 works

41.25 lacs

Department wise break-up of the expenditure incurred on relief and rehabilitation (immediate as well as long-term)

Name of Department

Type of Relief /Compensation and rehabilitation& cash doles

Expenditure

Revenue Department

1.      Grtituous relief & cash doles

2.      Subsidy

3.      C M S relief fund

4.      Food grains

4.50

31.00

2.50

6.60

Agriculture Department

1        Land reclamation leveling

2        Seeds & furtilizer for resowing

3        Chemical furtilizer

73.14 lacs

212.00 lacs

50.15 lacs

P.W.D. Department

1. Repairs to road, bridges, canseway

524.00 lacs

Municipal Council

1. Repairs to road, draim water supply

114.00 lacs

Irrigation Department

1. Repairs to dams, MI Tanks K.T. Weir & lift Irrigation schemes

227.12

M.S.E.B.

1. Repairs to transmission lines, Sub-Stations Etc.

23.45

Water supply Environmental engineering Division

Repairs to pipe water supply scheme, borwewlls, handpumps Etc.

41.25

Zilla Parishad

Repairs to Primary Health Centre nuildings expenditure on mecicines school, Panchayat building

36.29

Toal

1146.00


Organisation Structure :

            Following departments are involved to manage the emergency :

1.      Revenue Department

2.      Forest Department

3.      Public Works Department

4.      Police Department

5.      Food & Civil Supplies Department

6.      Health Department

1.      Revenue Department : Revenue Department manage to evacuate the sufferers to safer sites during the emergency and gave them cash doles and gratituous relief. This department also did the work of assessment of loss and damages, and resettlement of the affected population.

2.      Forest Department : This department arranged for supply of bamboo and ballies for temporary structures to be constructed for flood victims.

3.      Public Works Department : This department arranged restoration of road communication and construct temporary structures. They also take care of permanent resettlement of the victims by constructing houses.

4.      Police department : Police Department helped Revenue Department and others to carry our releif work withour any hindrance during disaster period and also safeguard the properties of flood victims.

5.      Flood Civil Supplies Department : Arrengement of foodgrains to be supplied to the flood and victims and other essential commodities was made by this department.

6.      Health Department : In order to avoid outbreak of epedmics in the disaster affected area, this department took preventive measures for maintaining sanitary conditions and also aranged for medicines required for flood victims as a preventive measures.

Support from State and Central Authorities :

a)      From State Govt. :

i)                    Funds were obtainer from State Govt. for relief and rehabilitation work

ii)                   Cultivators were given financial assistance for resowing of crops in Rabbi season and to purchase livestock lost in floods.

b)      From Central Government :

i)                    Central water commission officers rendered very usefull service during flood by giving advance warning of flood accurality.

ii)                   Central assistance was obtained to supplement the aid given from State Government.

iii)                 Telecommunication department also helped in restorng distrupted telecommunication

Mobilising Resources :

There was very good response from local non-Government organisation to carry out the relief work for flood victims. The Collector made appeal to NGOs to come forward for relief work and these was very posotive response. Following NGOs. Worked for relief work:

1)      Jalaram Mandal Chandrapur

2)      Rotary Club of Chandrapur

3)      Rajasthani Mandal Chandrapur

4)      Lions Club Chandrapur

Bottlenecks in Maintaining the Situation :

i)                    There is no legislation to compel the people affected by flood to shift with their belongings to the safer sites. Sometime people are reluctant to shift in-spite of constant threat from floods and administration becomes helpless. Thiscauses avoidable damage and loss to the human life and property. It is, therefore, necessary to have a legislation to compel people to shift in such a situation.

ii)                   Mechanised boats were not reaily available for rescue operations. Had there been a few boats at the disposal of Collecor in the district, those could have been used without any delay in rescue operations. A few boats be made the available to Collector for thispurpose.

iii)                 Telecommunication  was totally disrupted and hence wireles is the only means of communication. There is no wirelesss net work between  Collectorate and offices. It is necessary to have wireless net work between Collectorate and Thasil offices to effectively manage the situation when telecommunication net work fails.

iv)                 There was abnormal delay in availing the services of helicopter for air-droping of food packets. Some system may be evolved so that District Magistrate  can directly request the concerned Air-force authorities requisitioning the servics of  helicopters in emergency. On such requisition Air force authorities should make the helicopter available withour any delay.

Lessions Learnt and Suggestions:

1.         Warning system has to be deviced in su ch a way that flood warning can be communicated to the vulnarable population well in advance.

2.         Local Revenue and Police officers should be armed with power to forcibly shift the people living in flood prone areas whenever necessary.

3.         Flood zone should be distincly marked in all the flood prone villages and no new construction should be allowd in that area by law to avoid losses of property.

4.         The villages which are affected by flood very frequently should be shifted to safer sites forcibly to avoid recurring losses and Govt. financial assistance.

5.         Agriculturists are normally paid financial assistance upto Rs. 1000/- per hector limited to two hectors in kind. It is suggested that instead of giving such relief, crop insurance should be provided to all the crops so that whatever damages are caused to crops are made good. Financial assistance for sowing crops in next season should also be given by the Government. It is also suggested that suitable crop pattern should be found out for the areas which are frequently affected by the floods so that crops can sustain the crops can be minimised. Agriculture department may come out with detailed guidelines for flood prone areas.

6.         In under to establishe a machinary for forward planning to ensure efficient , prompt and effective management and control of natural disasters, it is necessary to enact Disaster Management Act, giving sufficient authority to Government agencies envolved in management of disasters.

7.         It is necessary to provide traning to all those who matter in disaster management and mitigation training can be of following types : Disaster Management training, Upgradation of skills, Cordnation training, Specialiesd training.

8.  Man made calamities

Whenever huge lands are acquired for big projects such as Western Coal fields ltd. , Nippon Denro, Thermal Project, Private Coal Mines, Small Rivers & Nallas are divertade haphazardly unscientifically which many a times result in founding of such area which was not flood prone and therefore more lossess are coused. It should be made compulsory for acquiring bodies to get the disigns of Nalla/River diversion approved by the irrigation department and submit certificate to land acquisition officer in this regard before publication of section 6 notification. In this district huge lossess where caused by improper diversion of Nallah’s by Western Coal fields Ltd. Authority.

CAPABILITY ANALYSIS

Inventory and Evaluation of Resources

Inventory and evaluation of resources is necessary for assessing the capacity of the district to respond effectively to different types of disaster, and more spedifically to the disasters that the district  is specially vlunerable to. In case of Chandrapur district, the capability is judged primarily in terms of its ability to respond to an earthquake and flood. During disaster, both Governmental and non-governmental ( including private) resources are planned to be mobilised. The list of resources available with the government and other agencies is given  in the following sections.These will be updated from time to time.

Communication and Mass Media

Monitoring Instruments

For Monitoring, prediting and warning system for specific disasters, the following technology is available :

Disaster

Monitoring Stations

Monitoring Instruments

Warning  System and Technology

Department/

Agency

Earthquake

Nil

Not available in the district

NIC network & wireless/Tel.

Meleprological Deptt. Of India of Nagpur

Floods

11 Rainfall monitoring Stations-

Flood Monitoring Stations –4

Ranigauge

Wireless sets at 4 places Flood level measuring guage

Wireless, Telegramme, Telephone

Wireless sets, Telephone

1.      RevenueDeptt. Of State Govt. ( Collector, SDO, Tahsildar)

2.      Irrigation Deptt.

3.      Central Water Commission ( SDO)

4.      Irrigation Deptt.

Cyclones

Cyclones Warning on east & west coast of India

1.      Radar

2.      Satellite

Satellite, T.V.

Radio,Wireless

Meteorological Deptt. Of India T.V. / Radio Transmission stations

Epidemics

D.H.O./C.S. offices primary health centres

3.      Wireless, Telephone

Warning is given through Primary Health Centres & Rural Hospitals Staff

Public Health Deptt.

(DHO & Civil Surgeon)

Industrial & Chemical Accident

Factory Concerned

1.      Siren

2.      Telephone

3.      Fire Tenders

4.      DCP & CO2 Fire Extingwisher.

5.      Toxic Gases Mask

6.      Self breathing approtus

7.      Antidote of Toxic Gases

1.      By sounding siren

2.      By Telephone / Megaphone

Factory Managers of respective factory

Fires

1.      Industries Concerned

2.      Tahsil Offices

3.      Police stations.

1.      Firebrigade

2.      Fire

extinguisher

1.      Wireless

2.      Telephone

3.      Fax

1.Revenue Deppt.

2Police Deptt.

3.Municipal administration

4.Factories concerned

Mass Media

List of Newspapers in Chandrapur district

Name of Newspaper

Name of Editor and Place of Publication

Mahavidharbha ( Marathi, Hindi)

Chandrapur Samachar

Khalsa Sandesh

Mahasagar

Ballarpur Times

Sannata

Vananchal

Shri Keshaorao Nalamwar, Editor Mul Road Chandrapur Ph.No. 55050

Shri Chandragupta Raipure, Editor Jatpura Ward Chandrapur

Ph.No. 53250 53251

Shri Harvindar Singh Dhunna, Editor Sarkar Nagar, Chandrapur

Ph.No. 53902

Suryakant Jain, Editor Chandrapur

Ph.No. 55409

Ratan Maheshwari, Editor Nagpur Road Chandrapur Ph.No.50899

Shri Champatrao Ladke, Editor Samadhi Ward Chandrapur

Ph.No. 53852

Shri Harcharan Singh Wadhwan, Editor Main Road Chandrapur Ph.No. 55562

There is a T.V. Relay Transmitter and a Radio Station at Chandrapur    

Administrative Preparedness

Existing Emergency Action Plans

Taking into consideration the spefific vulnerability of the district to flood and industrial accidents, the district has already prepared-

·                     Disaster Management Plan for flood control for  Chandrapur District.

·                     DDMAP for hazardous industries

·                     Every hazardous industry has also prepared their own Disaster Management Plan.

There is no multi response plan to all types of hazards prepared for Chandrapur District. There is no mutual aid and response group ( MARG) in the district.

Control Room at the district

Presently a Control Room has been eastablished at the District HQr. In collector’s office to respond to disaster related emergencies. The R.D.C. and Dy. Collector ( Lands) Chandrapur are the officer-in-charge of the District Control Room. They are responsible for the Flood warning, evacuation warnings, relief measures & coordination with Government agencies and N.G.Os Control Rooms will also function in all taluka offices with Naib Tahsildar HQ. As incharge

Community Education and Preparedness Programme

Since the main anticipated disaster is due to flood, a Flood Control Programme is prepared every year before onset of monsoon after discussion with the Members of District Flood Control Committee. Programme for the community educaton and preparedness to overcome any disaster is given wide publicity in the district in general and vulnerable areas in particular.

Measures taken for protection of life/crop/property

The landless labourers from rural areas are given  Life Insurance cover by the Government of sum of Rs. 10000/- against accidental death. If the death occurs due to natual calamity, the State Government grants ex-gratia payment of Rs. 25,000/- to the next of kin of deaceased person. In deserving cases, Govt. of India also pays ex-gratia payment of Rs. 25,000/- per victim to the next of kin.

As present, Crop Insurance Scheme is ot in force for Damages against lossess by Natural calamities. However, by any major calamities. However, by any major calamities, the small holders who suffer crop damage of more than 50% are given loans and subsidies by Agricultural Department. Soil conservation measures are also taken under EGS at Governmental cost in cases where agricultural land is damaged and top soil is washed away.  

Disaster Specific Capability Analysis

Taking into consideration the spefific vulnerability of the district to flood and industrial accidents, the district has already prepared-

·                     Disaster Management Plan for flood control for  Chandrapjr District.

·                     DDMAP for hazardous industries

·                     Every hazardous industry has also prepared their own Disaster Management Plan.

There is no multi response plan to all types of hazards prepared for Chandrapur District.

There is no mutual aid and response group ( MARG) in the district.

Chandrapur District being prone to floods, road acidents and epidemic, certain special equipments will be required to manage these disaster. Particularly in floods, special type of machinaries and equipments are required for removing of debrics, carcases of dead animals, clearance of new resettlement site.

 Preparednes Measures Undertaken by Various  Departments

In addition to the administrative preparedness measures, the  district control room will receive reports on preparedness from the relevant  district level departments  and other departments,  as per the details given below. This will enable the District Collector to analyse the capabilities and preparedness measures of various departments and report on the same to the Emergency Operations Centre, Relief Commissioner and Divisional Commissioner.

Preparedness Checklist   for Police (to be filled in by the Department Head and submitted to the District Collector every six months)

Preparedness measures taken

Details/Remarks

The  department is familiar with  disaster response plan and disaster response procedures are clearly defined

Orientation and training for disaster response plan and procedures  undertaken

Special skills required during emergency operations imparted to the officials and the staff.

Reviewed  and updated

·         Precautionary measures and procedures

·         the precautions to be taken to protect equipment 

·         the post-disaster  procedures to be followed.

Adequate warning mechanisms established for evacuation

A officer has been designated as Nodal Officer for Disaster Management

Sources of materials required for response operations have been identified

Reported  By :

Designation

Signature

Date

Preparedness Checklist for Public Health Department (to be filled in by the Civil Surgeon and District Health Officer and submitted to the DCR every six months)

Preparedness Measures taken

Details/ Remarks

The  department is familiar with  disaster response plan and disaster response procedures are clearly defined

A hospital plan for the facilities, equipment and staff of that particular hospital based on “The Guide to Health Management in Disasters” has been developed.

Orientation and training for disaster response plan and procedures undertaken

Special skills required during disaster situations  are imparted to the officials and the staff.

Hospital staff are aware of which hospital rooms/ buildings are damage-proof.

Reviewed  and updated

·         precautionary measures and procedures

·         the precautions that have  to be taken to protect equipment

·         the post-disaster  procedures to be followed.

All hospitals’ staff have been informed about the possible disasters in the district, likely damages and effects,        and information about ways to protect life, equipment and property.

An area of the hospital identified for receiving large numbers of casualties.

Emergency admission procedures with adequate record keeping developed.

Field staff oriented about 

·         DDMAP

·         standards of services,

·         procedures for   tagging.

A officer has been designated as Nodal Officer for Disaster Management

Sources of materials required for response operations have been identified

Reported  By :

Designation                             Signature                                 Date

Preparedness Checklist for MSEB (to be filled in by the Department Head and submitted to the District Collector every six months)

Preparedness measures taken

Details/Remarks

The  department is familiar with disaster response plan and  disaster response procedures are clearly defined 

Orientation and training for disaster response plan and procedures  undertaken

Special skills required during emergency operations imparted to the officials and the staff.

Reviewed  and updated

·         Precautionary measures and procedures

·         the precautions to be taken to protect equipment 

·         the post-disaster  procedures to be followed.

A officer has been designated as Nodal Officer for Disaster Management

Sources of materials required for response operations have been identified

Reported  By :

Designation

Signature

Date

 

Preparedness Checklist for Maharashtra Jeevan Pradhikaran (to be filled in by the Department Head and submitted to the District Collector every six months)

Preparedness Measures Taken

Details/Remarks

The  department is familiar with  disaster response plan and disaster response procedures are clearly defined

Orientation and training for disaster response plan and procedures undertaken

Special skills required during emergency operations imparted to the officials and the staff.

Reviewed  and updated

·         Precautionary measures and procedures

·         the precautions to be taken to protect equipment 

·         the post-disaster  procedures to be followed.

Adequate warning mechanisms for informing   people to store an emergency supply of drinking water have been developed.

Procedures established for the emergency distribution of water if existing supply is disrupted.

A officer has been designated as Nodal Officer for Disaster Management

Sources of materials required for response operations have been identified

Reported  By :

Designation

Signature

Date

Preparedness Checklist   for Irrigation Department (to be filled in by the Department Head and submitted to the District Collector every six months)

Preparedness measures taken

Details/Remarks

The  department is familiar with  disaster response plan and disaster response procedures are clearly defined

Orientation and training for disaster response plan and procedures undertaken

Special skills required during emergency operations imparted to the officials and the staff.

Reviewed  and updated

·         Precautionary measures and procedures

·         the precautions to be taken to protect equipment 

·         the post-disaster  procedures to be followed.

Flood monitoring mechanisms can be activated in all flood prone areas from 1st  of June.

All staff are well aware of precautions to be taken to protect their lives and personal property.

Each technical assistant has  instructions and knows operating procedures for disaster conditions.

Methods of monitoring and impounding the levels in the tanks evolved. 

Methods of alerting officers on other dam sites  and the district control room, established

Mechanisms evolved for

·         forewarning  settlements in the downstream

·         evacuation

·         coordination with other dam authorities

A officer has been designated as Nodal Officer for Disaster Management

Sources of materials required for response operations have been identified

Reported  By :

Designation

Signature

Date

Preparedness Checklist for Telecommunications (to be filled in by the Department Head and submitted to the District Collector every six months)

Preparedness measures taken

Details/Remarks

The  department is familiar with disaster response plan and  disaster response procedures are clearly defined 

Orientation and training for disaster response plan and procedures  undertaken

Special skills required during emergency operations imparted to the officials and the staff.

Reviewed  and updated

·         Precautionary measures and procedures

·         the precautions to be taken to protect equipment 

·         the post-disaster  procedures to be followed.

A officer has been designated as Nodal Officer for Disaster Management

Sources of materials required for response operations have been identified

Reported  By :

Designation

Signature

Date

Preparedness Checklist   for PWD (to be filled in by the Department Head and submitted to the District Collector every six months)

Preparedness Measures taken

Details/Remarks

The  department is familiar with  disaster response plan and disaster response procedures are clearly defined

Orientation and training for disaster response plan and procedures  undertaken

Special skills required during emergency operations imparted to the officials and the staff.

Reviewed  and updated

·         Precautionary measures and procedures

·         the precautions to be taken to protect equipment 

·         the post-disaster  procedures to be followed.

All officers are familiar with pre-disaster  precautions and post-disaster procedures for road clearing and for defining safe evacuation routes where necessary.

A officer has been designated as Nodal Officer for Disaster Management

Sources of materials required for response operations have been identified

Reported  By :

Designation

Signature

Date

Preparedness Checklist for Agriculture Department (to be filled in by the Department Head and submitted to the District Collector every six months)

Preparedness Measures taken

Details/Remarks

The  department is familiar with  disaster response plan and disaster response procedures are clearly defined

Orientation and training for disaster response plan and procedures  undertaken

Special skills required during emergency operations imparted to the officials and the staff.

Reviewed  and updated

·         Precautionary measures and procedures

·         the precautions to be taken to protect equipment 

·         the post-disaster  procedures to be followed.

Information provided to all concerned  about the disasters, likely damages to crops and plantations,   and information about ways to protect the same.

The  NGOs and other relief organisations are informed about  the resources of the department

A officer has been designated as Nodal Officer for Disaster Management

Sources of materials required for response operations have been identified

Reported  By :

Designation

Signature

Date

Preparedness Checklist for Animal Husbandry Department (to be filled in by the Department Head and submitted to the District Collector every six months)

Preparedness measures taken

Details/Remarks

The  department is familiar with  disaster response plan and disaster response procedures are clearly defined

Orientation and training for disaster response plan and procedures undertaken

Special skills required during emergency operations imparted to the officials and the staff.

Reviewed  and updated

·         Precautionary measures and procedures

·         the precautions to be taken to protect equipment 

·         the post-disaster  procedures to be followed.

Hospital staff are aware of which hospital rooms/ buildings are damage-proof.

All veterinary hospitals and centres’ staff have been informed about the possible disasters, likely damages and effects, and information about ways to protect life, equipment and property.

An  area of the hospital identified for receiving large numbers of livestock.

Emergency admission procedures with adequate record keeping developed.

A officer has been designated as Nodal Officer for Disaster Management

Sources of materials required for response operations have been identified

Reported  By :

Designation

Signature

Date

Public and Private Resources Inventory

Resources inventory indicating man power, transport,infrastructure and equipments with private and public institutions indicates the reponse capasity of the district. The details of resources availoable with public and private agencies are given in the tables below.

Infrastructure available

Considering the public private resources, the capability of the district and the resources available is summarised below

The number of NGOs working in the district

:

26

Staff available with NGOs

:

660

Significant CVOs

:

10

Private Hospitals

:

40

Police Service Personnel

:

2331

Fire Brigade Personnel

:

32

Health Service Personnel

:

2050

Defence Service Personnel

:

320

Home Guards Personnel

:

600

Infrastructure

Number of towns with Fire Brigade Service

:

4

Number of PrivateHospitals with Surgery facility

:

12

Number of Public Hospitals with Surgery Facility and Ambulance service

:

12

(one with Police)

Number of Ambulance with Private Organisiation

:

2

Number of Ambulance with Public Organisation

:

14

Number of X-ray machines with private institutions

:

6

Number of X-ray machines with public institutionsI

:

13

Number of blood banks with private institutions

:

5

Number of blood banks with public institutions

:

4

Number of beds with private Hospitals

:

422

Number of beds with public organisations

Public Hospitals

MSEB

Defence

:

:

:

874

3

48

Number of trauma care centres in private hospitals

:

NIL

Number of trauma care centres in Public hospitals

:

11

Number of trauma care centres in public hospitals

:

70

Number of pathological labs with private organisations

:

4

Number of pathological labs with public organisations

:

20

Number of boats

:

10

Technology support

*Satellite Communication link with Mantralaya via NIC available

*Police Wireless communication accessible

*Telephones available in all taluka headquarters

*Fax Machines available in all taluka headquarters

Special equipment available at the District level

In this district following machinaries and equipments are available with government departments or Private Contractors.

Sr.

Specialized Machinaries and Equipmants

Govt. Deptt./Organisation

Private Contractors

No.

Deptt./Organisation

No.

Name

1

Hydraulic excavator

35

Western Coal Fields Ltd. (WCL)

2

3

2

M/s. H.K. Enterprises,

G.P.O. Square, Civil Line, Nagpur

M/s. V.D. Kanal

0-9, Laxmi Nagar

Nagpur-440 022

B.C. Biyani, Govt. Contractor, Mamta Palace Professor Colony

Bhusawal

2

3

4

Excavator loader

(Pay loader)

Bulldozer

Air Compressor

9

60

--

WCL

WCL

--

1

2

2

1

3

3

1

1

1

Laxmi Construction Company, H.NO.2-2-647/132a, Central Exsice Colony, Hyderabad

M/s Srinivasa Construction Company, Karanji, Tq. Pandharkawada Dist. Yavatmal

Ph.(07235)3227,3225

M/s V.D. Kanal

B.C. Biyani

B.C. Biyani

Laxmi Constr. Company

Srinivasa Constr. Company

M/S V.D. Kanal

B.C. Biyani

 


Adequacy of Existing Inventory for Disaster Management

In order to equip the district for managing disaster effectively, it is necessary to assess adequacy of present resources.

·                     There are 11 rainfall monitoring centres and 4 flood control monitoring centres. Rainfall monitoring centres are managed by the Tahsildar while flood monitoring centres are managed by Central Water Commission officers. Wireless and Telecommunication facilities are available at monitoring stations for giving warnings.

·                     There are 26 NGOs working in the district. The NGOs support appears to be inadequate during disaster inview of their limited sources and capabilities.

·                     There are only 4 towns having Firebrigades which are insuffieient to meet the emergencies.. It is necessary to have firebrigades at al 12 taluka headquarters and major urban centres. Morever, it is also necessary to modernise fire station by upgrading their skills and providing them latest equipments.

·                     Though Control Room exists at Chandrapur, it needs complete modernisation. It is necessary to have wireless net work connected with all taluka headquarters and Flood monitoring stations.

·                     There are only 5 mechanized baots in the district which are inadequate to meet the exigencies.

·                     In order to equip the district with all necessary equipments, the equipments,the requirements of the district has been worked out and mentioned in mitigation section.

·                     A list of additional equipments required with its approximate cost is given below:

MITIGATION STRATEGY

Requirements of Chandrapur district for responding to future disaster events

Sr.

Item

Rs. ( In Lakh )

Total Quantity

Cost of Items

Total cost Rs.

1

Mechanically Operating boats

20

250000/-

50.00

2

Donga (Manualy Operated boats)

20

20000/-

04.00

3

Tents for temporary shelters

100

10000/-

10.00

4

Poses (Running meters)

1000

100/-

01.00

5

Torches/Gas/Stoves

100

150/-

00.15

6

Gum Boots

100

500/-

00.50

7

Hand Gloves

100 Pairs

100/-

00.10

8

Storage arrangement for drinking water sintex tanks (500 liters tanks)

50

2000/-

01.00

9

Medical kit first aid boxes 100

20

1000/-

00.20

10

Ghameles 100, Phawadas 100, Buckets 100

--

100/-

00.30

11

Tarpaulins

20

20000/-

02.00

12

Utensils for Kitchen etc.

1000/-

00.10

13

Ballies

100

100/-

00.10

14

Sataranjis (Cotton Carpets)

50

500/-

00.25

15

Helmets

100

1000/-

01.00

Total

69.70

Warning system and Dissemination Methods:

Wireless net work between taluka and district headquarters, flood monitoring senters to taluka and district headquarters.

Temporary wireless sets should be provided during monsoon in highly flood prone areas.

Railway authorities and officers of central Water Commission having facilities of monitoring flood levels in rivers should be equipped  with wireless facilities to give advance warning to the District Collectors of the district in the down stream.

Collector of Balaghat in M.P. can give advance warning of floods in Wainganga river to collector, Chandrapur, which will give at least 18 hours time to Collector, Chandrapur for evacuation measures.

Similarly, Collector, Baitul (M.P.) can give advance warning in Wardha River to Collector  Wardha & Chandrapur

The officers of Irrigation department looking after Major, Medium & Minor Dams should inform Tahsildars and villages concerned before releasing the surplus water from dams during rainy season.

Evacuation and Rescue

The rescue authorities i.e. Fire Brigades, Police Stations, Municipal Councils,

Gram Panchayats should have adequate quantity of the following :

Fire Fighting Equipments

Water Storage

Sprinklers

Ladders

Safety Masks

Ropes

Life Boats/tubes

Mechanised Boats

Manual Boats

Mobile Medical Vans

Sniffer dogs

Trucks

Trailers

Tippers

Mitigation Measures

Structural Measures

Widening of the State highway, MDR & Bridges.

Removal of blind curves

New firebrigades for 2 Municipal towns i.e. Bhadrawati & Warora

Establishment of Trauma centres on highways

Establishment of Mobile Health Laboratory

Non-Structural Measures

Blue and red zone to be demarcated for all major rivers i.e. Kanhan, Kolar, Am and Vena areas very frequently affected by floods-every five years-Blue zone and 30 years affected-Red zone.

High flood levels to be marked on pucca structures buildings  in low lying areas of flood affected villages/Road and Railways bridges

The town Planning Department needs to be strengthened to assist rural local bodies i.e. Gram Panchayats for effective implementation of building and zoning regulations to avoid recurring lossess of household in low lying flood prone area adjecent to rivers and nalas.

More elaborate planningo n watershed management schemes by Irrigation and Agriculture Departments is necessary in order to ensure that such schemes are directed specifically to control of floods as well.

Providing Highway with Danger signs

Implementation of earthquake building code in Rural Areas also. Special Earthquake prone zone planning needs to be studied by the Town Planning Department for the district. Building regulations in earthquake prone areas may be pprescribed and training needs to be imparted to Municipal and Gram Panchayat staff in this type of planning.

 INSTITUTIONAL ARRANGEMENTS AT THE DISTRICT LEVEL

Disaster management would involve many layers of participating organization. The three focal levels would be State, District and  the site of the disaster. The State level agencies would be involved in policy decisions, resource allocation, prioritisation of activities and budget allocation and monitoring through  the Emergency Operations Centre.

The District Disaster Management Committee   (DDMC) is an apex  planning body and  will play a major role in  preparedness and  mitigation.

The district level response will be coordinated under the guidance of District Collector who will act as District Disaster Manager.

Responsibilities of Collector

The Collector shall be responsible for

v      preparation of the DDMAP  with the assistance of the DDMC.

v      setting up District Control Room

v      encouraging  formation of Mutual Aid and Response Groups (MARG)

v      Under the DDMAP, district level  agencies would be responsible for directing field interventions through various agencies right from the stage of warning to relief and rehabilitation.

v      At the disaster site,  specific tasks to manage the disaster will be performed.

v      Collector will be an integral part of the DCR.

v      Collector will be assisted by SOC.

·         SOC will be headed by a Site Manager.

·         Site Manager will coordinate the activities at various camp sites and affected areas.

·         The Site Operations Centre will report to the District Control Room.

v      Collector will coordinate all the field responses. Field Responses include setting up Transit Camps,  Relief Camps and Cattle Camps.

The desk arrangements provides for division of tasks, information gathering and record keeping and accountability of the desk officer to the DDM for specific functions. Each desk should have a Desk Officer assigned. The capacity of various desks to coordinate amongst themselves and with the units to be coordinated will ultimately decide the quality of response. Such a function of coordination would largely depend on the capacity to effectively keep a track on communications received and the decisions taken. Pro forma for “In and Out Messages and Register” are given in  Annexure I.

Figure I

Coordination structure at district level

Disaster  Management Committee

A Disaster Management Committee exists to assist the Collector in

v      reviewing the threat of disasters

v      vulnerability of the district to such disasters

v      evaluating  the preparedness and

v      considering suggestions for improvement of the response document DDMAP.

The Committee meets once a year under the chairmanship of the Collector and consists of the following functionaries

The Collector                                                                         

Chairman

The District Superintendent of Police

Member

The Chief Executive Officer, Zilla Parishad

Member

The Additional Collector

Member

The Resident District  Collector                                            

Member-Secy

The Commissioner of Police (if any)

Member

The Chief Fire Officer

Member

The District Health Officer

Member

The District Agriculture Officer

Member

The District Animal Husbandry Officer

Member

The Civil Surgeon

Member

The Executive Engineer, P. W. Department

Member

The Executive Engineer, Irrigation Department

Member

The Executive Engineer, Minor Irrigation Division

Member

The Executive Engineer, M.S.E.B.

Member

The Executive Engineer, MWSSB

Member

The Deputy Director of Education

Member

The Divisional Manager, Railways

Member

The Regional Transport Officer

Member

The Regional Manager, M.S.R.T.C.

Member

The District Publicity Officer

Member

The District Supply Officer

Member

The Local Station Director, A.I.R.

Member

The Local Station Director, Doordarshan

Member

The District Commandant, Home Guards

Member

The Divisional Forests Officer

Member

Sub-Divisional Officer(s)

Member

The Local Assistant Engineer, P. and T. Department

Member

The  Defence Units.

Member

District Level NGOs representative

Members

MARG representatives

Members

District Control Room

The District Control Room, under the control of the district collector, will be the nerve centre

v      to monitor

v      co-ordinate and

v      implement the actions for disaster management. 

In a disaster situation the District Collector is the central authority  exercising   emergency powers to issue directives to all departments to provide emergency response service.

Normal Time Activity

The normal time activity of the Disaster Manager is to

v      ensure that all warning and communication systems, instruments are in working condition.

v      receive information on  a routine basis from the district departments on the vulnerability of the various talukas and villages to disasters

v      the Disaster Manager will receive reports on preparedness from the relevant  district level departments  and other departments,  as per information details. These will be forwarded to the Emergency Operations Centre, Relief Commissioner and Divisional Commissioner.

v      Upgrade and update DDMAP according to changing scenarios in the district

v      Update data bank and maintain an inventory of resources as per  Table 1.

v      Inform Emergency Operations Centre (EOC) and  YASHADA of any changes including updating of data bank and annexures

v      Monitor preparedness measures, training activities  including simulation exercises undertaken by various departments

v      Ensure proper dissemination of DDMAP at the district level, local level and disaster prone areas

v      Encourage formation of MARG in industrial areas.

v      Organise post-disaster evaluation and update DDMAP accordingly

v      Prepare reports and documents on district level disaster events and submit the same to EOC.  The document should include

Ø           source and cause of the disaster,

Ø           description of the response effort,

Ø           recommendations for preventive and mitigation measures,

Ø           plans for upgrading emergency preparedness and response plans.

Table I

Inventory of resources, materials and equipment accessible to DCR

(to be updated by District Control Room every six months and sent to Emergency Operations Centre)

Material/equipment

Departments/Agencies available with

Normal stock/quantity/amount

AC-sheets

13 Private Dealers

30,000 sheets

Ambulances

Civil Surgeon, Voltas Factory, WCL, MSEB, Ordnance Factory, MES, L&T, Manikgarh Cement

Atleast one each

Asbestos sheets

12 Private stockists

Sufficient

Bamboo mats

Private Dealers

Sufficient

Blankets and durries

Govt Hospital, DHO, Civil Surgeon

Blood Banks

Civil Hospital, Sanmitra Mandal , Ninave Hospital, Ankur Hospital

4

Boats/Rescue Boats

Police

Irrigation Dept.,

Central water Commission

2

3

5

Bullies

Conservators of Forest (North & south)

RM, FDCM

Sufficient

Buses

MSRTC and Private

620

Cattle-feed (Pre-mix)

Dy.Director of Animal Husbandry and Private Dealers

Sufficient Qty

Construction equipments

PWD, WCL, Private Contractors

Cooked food

Charitable Trusts

Cooking vessels for use in relief camps

Cranes

WCL,

Police

19

1

Drivers

Police

Home Guard

Private

60

10

120

Earth moving equipments

WCL

Dumpers 12

GI-pipes

10 Prvate dealers

Sufficient Qty

GI-sheets

15 private dealers

Sufficient Qty

Jeeps

Various  Govt Depts

Private

181

60

Mobile trauma care vans

Nil

Mobile X-Ray units

--

Nil

Public address systems

Govt

Private

21

110

Pumps – diesel

              electric  

              hand pumps

Self breathing apparatus

Govt Hospital

6

Sign boards

--

--

Sniffer dogs

Police

1

Tagging slips

--

--

Tankers

Irrigation Dept, PWD

13

Telephone instruments

Tents

Dy.Director of Geology and Mining

Police

12

30

Toxic gas masks

--

--

Tractor

Govt

Private

12

110

Trucks

Govt

Private

110

54

VHF sets with batteries

Wireless sets

Police

CWC

Irrigation Dept

92

2

19



Warning or Occurrence of Disaster

On the basis of reports from the possible disaster site, or on warning from agencies competent to issue such a warning, or on the receipt of warning or alert from Emergency Operations Centre, the Collector will exercise the powers and responsibilities of  the District Disaster Manager.

It is assumed that the district administration would be one of the key organisations for issuing warnings and alerts. Additionally, the list of  agencies competent for issuing warning  or alert is given below:

Disaster                                                                      Agencies

Earthquakes                                                    IMD, MERI,

Floods                                                             Meteorology Department, Irrigation Department

Cyclones                                                         IMD

Epidemics                                                       Public Health Department

Road Accidents                                              Police

Industrial and Chemical Accidents                 Industry, MARG, Police,

Fires                                                                Fire Brigade, Police

The warning or occurrence of disaster will be communicated to

v      Chief Secretary, Relief Commissioner, Emergency Operations Centre,

v      Office of Divisional Commissioner

v      All district level officials, Municipal Councils, MARG

v      The officials of central government located within the district

v      Non-officials namely, Guardian Minister of the district,  Mayor, ZP President, MPs and MLAs from the district or affected area

v      Local units of the Defence Services

On the receipt of warning, all community preparedness measures and counter-disaster measures would come into operation. Further, the occurrence f the disaster would essentially bring into force the following :

v      The District Collector will activate the District Control Room as the District Disaster Manager.

v      The DCR will be expanded to include desk arrangements with responsibilities for specific tasks.

v      All district level staff from various departments will be under the direction and  control of the District Disaster Manager. These would also include the district level staff of

Ø           Zilla Parishad

Ø           Municipal Authorities

Ø           MSEB

Ø           MWSSB

Ø           PWD

Ø           MSRTC

Ø           Irrigation

Ø           District Industries Centre 

Ø           Telecommunications.

v      Leave of all officers and staff working with the above organisations, as requisitioned by the District Disaster Manager,  would automatically  stand cancelled and the organisations would direct their staff to report on duty immediately.

v      The Relief Commissioner is the controlling authority in respect of Grants under “2245-Relief on account of Natural Calamities and also Loans and Advances”. He shall, therefore, ensure that adequate grants are placed at the disposal of the Collector under these budget head and that implementation of relief and rehabilitation measures is not hampered on account of paucity of funds or otherwise.

v      The District Disaster Manager  may   in  case of large-scale disasters  get in  touch with the local Defence units for assistance for rescue, evacuation and emergency relief measures.

v      The District Disaster Manager  will have the authority to requisition  resources, materials and equipments from private sector.

v      The District Disaster Manager  will have  power to direct the industry to activate their on-site or off-site disaster management plan and seek assistance from MARG, if required.

v      The District Disaster Manager will set-up  Site Operations Centre/s in the affected area with desk arrangements

v      The District Disaster Manager  will authorise establishment of transit and/or relief camps, feeding centres and cattle camps.

v      An on-going wireless communication and contact from the DCR  to the Site Operations Centres, Transit Camps, Feeding Centres, Relief Camps and Cattle Camps will be activated.

v      The District Disaster Manager  will send the Preliminary  Information Report and Action Taken Report, as per the available information, to the Chief Secretary/Relief Commissioner/Emergency Operations Centre and the Divisional Commissioner.

v      The District Disaster Manager  will authorise immediate evacuation whenever necessary

v      In the event of possibilities of disasters in adjoining districts, including those beyond the state borders, the District Disaster Manager will issue the alert warning to them.

v      In multi-district disasters, if Additional Relief Commissioner is appointed at the multi-district level,   the District Disaster Manager  will report to  the Additional Relief Commissioner.

In the absence of Collector, Additional Collector or Assistant Collector or Resident Deputy Collector will officiate and exercise all the powers and responsibilities of the District Disaster Manager  listed above.

Desk Arrangements in District Control Room  

District Disaster Manager

v      Establishing Priorities

v      Direct and coordinate the services  of

Ø           Defence Services, SRP, CRPF, Home Guards, Coast Guards, CISF

Ø           Fire Brigade, Civil Defence

Ø           DOT, Railways, AAI, Port Trust,  FCI,

Ø           DD,  AIR

Ø           MSEB, MWSSB, MSRTC, PWD

Ø           Meteorological Department, MERI, MPCB,

Ø           State Government Aircrafts and  Helicopters

v      Coordinate with NGOs, and aid agencies

v      Enlist  services of GOI/GOM laboratories and expert institutions  for specialised services

Desk Assignments

Functions

Operations Desk

Resident Dy.Collector

Chandrapur

A.  Response Action for

v      Rescue and evacuation

v      Emergency transport for the seriously injured at the earliest possible time

v      Emergency supplies of water and cooked food

v      Salvage Operations

v      Disposal of dead

v      Transfer of marooned persons to transit camps at the earliest possible time

v      Within shortest possible time  for  marooned persons, water, medicines, first-aid, cooked food

v      Transit camps (in accordance with standards laid down) to be set-up at the earliest

v      Food Distribution Centres (in accordance to the Checklist) to be set-up at the earliest

B. Implement  procurement/purchase/hire/requisition plans    of materials  available at the district level. 

C. Establishing communication links

v      EOC

v      Office of Divisional Commissioner

v      Police, Railways, Fire Brigade, Defence Services, Civil Defence,  FCI, CISF, CPWD, PWD, MSEB, Irrigation, MWSSB, RTO, MPCB, IMD, and Inter-departmental relief activities within the district.

v      Mutual Aid and Response Group

v      NGOs and NGO coordinating committee

v      Private donors

D.  Reporting

v      Dispatch of Preliminary Information Report and Action Taken Report to Emergency Operations Centre and  Divisional Commissioner.

v      Dispatch of all  information and any other as asked for by  Emergency Operations Centre and  Divisional Commissioner.

v      Report to Emergency Operations Centre and  Divisional Commissioner on deployment and reinforcements of staff and resources.

v      Identify specific items for follow-up actions on the directives of the District Disaster Manager

E. Supervision and Monitoring of disaster management and relief activities within the district

F. Market Intervention

v      Promote and encourage revitalisation of local economic activities for speedy recovery

v      Prevent hoarding, price hiking and corruption and unauthorised sale of relief materials

v      Initiate  legal action on those engaged in  hoarding, price hiking, corruption and unauthorised sale of relief materials

G. General

v      Disseminate details about legal and official procedures, eligibility criteria with respect to relief and compensation for loss of life, injuries, livestock, crop, houses,  required to be adopted, as received from EOC

v      Maintenance of records (date of joining, period of service, leave record, overtime, etc) for all the persons deployed for relief work within the district

v      Obtaining orders, instructions, clearances, clarifications from state and divisional headquarters

v      Ensure implementation of orders, instructions,  from EOC and divisional headquarters at the disaster site.

v      Requisition of accommodation, structure, vehicles and equipments for relief duty

v      Issue of passes and identification stickers for vehicles on relief duty

v      Issue of passes and identity cards to relief personnel including the persons from NGOs

v      Sanctioning expenses for reimbursement with the approval of the District Disaster Manager (DDM).


Services Desk

Deputy Collector (Encroachments)

A. Assess

v      Search and rescue requirements as per information

v      Relief requirements as per information

B. Organise and coordinate

v      Relief camps (in accordance with standards laid down) to be set-up

v      Arrangements for dry rations and family kits for cooking

v      Cattle camps

v      Relief supplies to Transit and Relief camps or to  Site Operations Centre.

v      Supplies  of fodder and cattle-feed to cattle camps

v      Supply of seeds, agriculture inputs and services to Site Operations Centre.

v      Welfare Services

v      law and  order  (e.g., prevent looting and theft)

C. Coordinate NGO activities through necessary support to ensure community participation

v      Establishing coordination mechanisms among district level NGOs and other state level NGOs such as Indian Red Cross, Ramkrishna Mission, Bharat Sevashram,  Swami Narayan Trust, Bharatiya Jain Sanghatna,  OXFAM, CARE, CASA, CARITAS

v      identification of NGOs to serve on committees,  task force

v      assign  well-defined  area of operations and report to EOC

v      assigning specific response functions to specialised NGOs and report to EOC

v      reporting upon procurement and disbursement of relief materials received through government and non-government channels

v      Mobilise and coordinate work of volunteers ensuring  community participation


Infrastructure  Desk

Executive Engineer

P.W.D. no. 1

A. Organise and coordinate clearance of  debris

B. Temporary Repairs to  damaged infrastructure

v      power

v      water

v      transport

v      telecommunication

v      roads

v      bridges

v      canals

v      public buildings

C. Construction of Facilities

v      shelters with sanitation and recreation facilities

v      provision of hand-pumps and borewells

v      temporary structures for storage

v      educational facilities

v      medical facilities

v      postal facility

v      helipads


Health Desk

District Health Officer /

Civil Surgeon

A. Organise  and maintain records on

v      treatment of the injured and sick

v      preventive medicine and anti-epidemic actions

v      disposal of dead bodies

v      disposal of carcasses

v      Reports  on  food, water supplies, sanitation and disposal   of waste

B. Assess, supply and supervise

v      Medical relief for the injured

v      Number of ambulances required and hospitals where they could be sent, (public and private);

v      Medical equipment and medicines required

v      special information required regarding treatment as for epidemics etc.

C. Supervision of maintenance of standards

v      Identification of source for supply of drinking water through tankers and other means of transport

v      transit and relief camps for cooking arrangements, sanitation, water supply, disposal of waste, water stagnation and health services.

v      Communities for storage of rations, sanitation, water supply, disposal of waste, water stagnation and health services.

v      standards in cattle camps with arrangements for water, fodder, disposal of solid waste, veterinary services

Logistics Desk

District supply Officer

A. General

v      Assessment of  reinforcement needs including manpower and deployment of resources  as per information (formats given)

v      Requirement, availability and location of depots, and transportation of wood to the locations for mass cremation

v      Identification of location where mass cremation/burial can be carried out and Manpower and transport that would be required for this work;

v      Identification of location where carcasses can be disposed of  and Manpower and transport that would be required for this work;

v      Requesting for additional resources from other districts/divisional headquarters/EOC.

v      Arrangements with petrol pumps for supply of fuel for authorised relief vehicles against credit coupons

v      Coordinating and supervising issuing of  Village relief tickets to affected families

v      Ensuring safe storage, and transport of relief Supplies

v      Coordinate supplies distributed directly by NGOs and other organisations including private donors

v      Ensure proper maintenance of vehicles and equipment

B. Coordination of  Transport with

v      railways

v      MSRTC

v      Private transporters

v      Boat Operators

v      State Government Aircrafts

v      State Government Helicopters

C. Organising Transport for

v      Rescue parties

v      Relief Personnel

v      Marooned persons

v      Water, medicines, first aid and  cooked food for marooned persons

v      Volunteers

v      Relief Materials

v      Seriously injured and Sick


Agriculture Desk

Agriculture Development Officer

Organise and coordinate

v      Rehabilitation of  agricultural production

v      Ensuring  interim crop production through supply of seeds and other inputs

v      Services of extension staff

Communication and Information Management Desk

District Information Officer

A. Set-up  an information centre in DCR to organise sharing of information with mass media and  community

B. Monitor disaster warnings and weather conditions in coordination with and on the advise of

v      IMD,  Irrigation, MERI, Industries

C. General

v      Send Out-Messages on behalf of DDM

v      Maintaining  In-Message, Out-Message Register

v      Collect information from Site Operations Centre

v      Organise  information for  EOC and information on demand from Divisional Commissioner/EOC.

v      Serve as data bank required for managing operational aspects of disaster situations

D. Keep readily available all the information contained in DDMAP, including

v      Office and residence telephone numbers, fax numbers, and mobile numbers where applicable of Chief Secretary and other Secretaries including Divisional Commissioner

v      Phone numbers, names, addresses and pager numbers where applicable of the officers and staff of the district and Emergency Operations Centre

v      List of people  on the spot who can organise and co-ordinate the relief activities,

v      Phone numbers, fax numbers, wireless, etc. of the other control rooms;

v      Phone numbers, names, and addresses of the field officers

v      Phone numbers, names, and addresses Non-officials (like MPs, MLAS, and Corporators) in the District

v      Planning Information required including maps incorporated in DDMAP 

v      Disaster Site Map and indications on  extent to which other areas may be affected, etc. 

v      Information regarding alternate routes, water sources, layout of essential services which may be affected, etc.

Resources  Desk

Accounts Officer, IAW,

Collectorate

A. Maintenance of

v      Books of account for all cash receipts according to source of funding

v      Books of accounts for all cash disbursements according to source of funding

v      Stock register for all relief materials

v      Issue register for all relief materials

v      Dead stock register for all non-consumables (inventory)

v      Record of all personnel payment on TA&DA, daily wages and other incidentals made to relief personnel.

v      Records of all  expenses incurred on administration and disaster management.

v      Records of all transfer of funds (as advances) to other government departments (suspense account)

v      Records  of all cash vouchers and credit vouchers

v      Records of all gratuitous relief

v      Records of all compensation paid

v      Preparation of records relating to finance and accounts as per the formats for dispatch to Emergency Operations Centre

B. Issuing of receipts for

v      All cash receipts

v      All materials receipt

C. General

v      All payments of  approved expenses, dues, claims, daily wages

v      Reimbursement of expenses approved by administration

v      Issue of cash vouchers and credit vouchers for petrol and diesel



Role of Divisional Commissioner

On the occurrence of disaster, the Divisional Commissioner will

v      Provide for reinforcement of resources from other districts within the division

v      Keep in constant touch with Chief Secretary, Relief Commissioner, Emergency Operations Centre

Site Operations Centre and Relief Camps Planning Assumptions

v      A small scale disaster can be managed through Collector’s office without comprehensive desk arrangements at the DCR.

v      A Disaster  affecting

·         a number of villages

·         doing considerable damage to housing               

·         spread geographically over a large area and different locations

Þ     creates problems of management and logistics 

Þ     Decentralisation of relief activities will improve the efficiency of DCR. This will require organisation of desk arrangements at the camp sites.

Þ     Site Operations Centre and location of Relief Camps will ensure effective decentralisations and organisation of relief activities.

Site Operations Centre

Depending on the nature of disaster and the type of damage, it may be necessary to set-up a number of relief camps and/or cattle camps.

·         In such a situation, the DDM may decide to set-up a Site Operations Centre to reduce the pressure on DCR for field coordination.

·         Depending on the disaster locations and the number of camp sites, the DDM may decide to set-up more than one Site Operations Centre.

·         The Site Operation Centre and the camps would be wound up after the relief and rehabilitation work is called off or after the relief camps and cattle camps are dismantled whichever is later.

·         The activities for the Site Operations Centre are given in Table III.

·         The Site Operations Centre will be managed by Site Manager of the rank of Sub-Divisional Officer/Deputy Collector.

It may be noted that a coordinating structure of this type may have many areas of overlap with the DCR and therefore the activities  need not be duplicated. The basic functions of the Site Operations Centre will be to facilitate communication and coordination between DCR and the camp sites. A skeleton structure as given in Table II should be able to perform these tasks.

Relief Camps

Relief Camps would be set-up preferably on settlement lines and unless the disaster is a localised phenomenon, the DDM may decide to set-up as many camps as the number of villages affected. Also the size of the camp will be one of the considerations particularly in urban areas to decide on the number. The administrative structure for such relief camps  responsible for direct service to “victims” is given in Table III. Each relief camp will be assigned to a Camp Officer, of the rank of Tahsildar. In some of the disasters, it may be necessary to set-up Feeding centres only for the victims.

The DDM may agree  to assign some such relief camps or feeding centres to willing non-governmental organisations (NGOs) with demonstrated capability and required manpower. However, such camps would also come under coordinating mechanisms established through Site Operations Centre/s or DCR.

Table II

Site Operations Centre 

(at a convenient location from the disaster  site for coordinating site operations)

Activities

A.  Response Action for

v      Rescue and evacuation

v      Salvage Operations

v      Disposal of dead

v      Transit camps (in accordance with standards laid down)

v      Feeding Centres (in accordance to the Checklist) for  two weeks to be set-up at the earliest

v      Emergency supplies of water and cooked food

B. Communication  with

v      Emergency Operations Centre

v      District control room

v      District administration staff in the area

v      Camp Officer for transit camps, relief camps and cattle camps.

v      NGOs and NGO coordinating committee

C. Communicate to DCR

v      Search and rescue requirements

v      Resource requirements

v      Cash Compensation

v      Receive, store, secure, transport, relief materials for transit, relief and cattle camps, and affected villages.

v      All information  and subsequent demands to district control room

D. Organise

v      Preventive medicine and anti-epidemic actions

v      Inspection of  food, water supplies, sanitation and disposal of waste

Table III

Relief Camps  (Components)

(at a convenient location from the disaster  site for relief )

Desk Assignments

Functions

Operations  Desk A.  Undertake Response Action for

v      Salvage Operations

v      Feeding Centres  for  two weeks to be set-up at the earliest

B. Coordination with

v      Site Operations Centre

v      District Control Room

v      District administration staff in the area

v      NGOs

v      Private donors

C. Manage

v      Dispatch of all information (as per the formats) and subsequent demands to DCR/Site Operations Centre

v      Organise shifts for staff and Supervision of the same

D. General

v      Maintenance of  records (date of joining, period of service, leave record, overtime, etc) for all the persons deployed for relief work at operations centre

v      Get sanction for expenses for reimbursement from the DDM through Site Operations Centre.


Services Desk

A. Assess

4.1.1    

v      Resource requirements

B. Organise

v      Arrangements for dry rations and family kits for cooking within two weeks of the disaster

v      Relief supplies to families or to  households including water, clothing, and food

C. Provide Welfare services

v      Restoration of family (including locating  missing children, relatives, friends) 

v      Assistance in locating missing cattle

v      Assisting students to continue with their studies

v      Services for the orphans

v      Assisting individuals with special needs (pregnant women, infants, handicapped, old, widows etc)

v      Counselling services

v      Promotive services for mental health

Infrastructure  Desk A. Clear debris

B. Mobilise community participation and coordinate building of 

v      shelters for affected people with  sanitation facilities

v      temporary structures for storage

v      Kitchens

v      medical facilities

v      education facility

v      recreational facility

v      postal facility

v      temporary Repairs to  damaged infrastructure

4.1.2      

Health Desk

A. Organise

v      disposal of dead bodies

v      disposal of carcasses

v      disposal of waste and waste water

v      Treatment of the injured and sick

v      Preventive medicine and anti-epidemic actions

v      Inspection of  food, water supplies, sanitation and disposal of waste

4.1.3    

Logistics Desk

v      Issue Village relief tickets to affected families

v      Organise distribution of Relief Supplies

v      Receive, store, secure,  relief materials for relief camps, and affected villages.

v      Coordinate supplies distributed directly by NGOs and other organisations including private donors

v      Ensure proper maintenance of vehicles and equipment

v      Ensure optimum utilisation of resources such as fuel, food, and other relief materials

v      Mobilise and coordinate work of volunteers ensuring  community participation

v      Organise facilities for staff and volunteers


Communication and Information Management Desk

Collect and dispatch following information to Site Operations Centre

v      Data collection

v      Record keeping

v      Assistance in locating missing persons

v      Information Centre

v      Organisation  of information for Site Operations Centre  and on specific demands.

v      Maintaining In-Message and Out-Message Register

v      Sending all Out-Messages on behalf of Camp Officer of Relief Camp.

Resources Desk

A. Maintenance of

v      Books of account for all cash receipts 

v      Books of accounts for all cash disbursements

v      Stock register for all relief materials

v      Issue register for all relief materials

v      Dead stock register for all non-consumables (inventory)

v      Record of all personnel payment for daily wages and other incidentals made to relief personnel.

v      Records of all  expenses incurred on administration and disaster management at relief camp.

v      Records of all gratuitous relief

v      Records of all compensation paid

v      Preparation of records relating to finance and accounts as per the formats for dispatch to Site Operations Centre

B. General

v      All cash donations must be deposited with District Control Room and a receipt for the same obtained

v      All material donations must be entered in stock register  and made available for inspection to officer from the District Control Room or Site Operations Centre

v      Maintain record of all issue of cash vouchers and credit vouchers for petrol and diesel

4.1.4    


Facilities/Amenities Provided in the DCR

Planning Assumption

v      The Collector’s office has an adjoining Meeting Room, which can accommodate approximately 30-40 people. Hence, this will be used as a Conference  Room.

v      The Communication Room is located next to  the Collector’s office

Layout

The DCR  has

v      adequate space for a large workstation

v      various desk arrangements during  disaster situations. 

The DCR is equipped with

v      necessary furniture and storewells for keeping

Ø           files of messages

Ø           stationery

Ø           other office equipment. 

v      Action Plans including sub-plans and local plans

v      Vulnerability Maps

v      List of key contact persons

[Are easily accessible with clear labels,  and not kept under lock and key]. 

Important phone numbers which are frequently required are displayed on the wall so that they can be seen easily,   while other phone numbers, names and addresses etc., are also  maintained on the computer to facilitate easy retrieval and cross-referencing..

Provision is made for

v      first-aid and other basic medical relief for the staff

v      a rest room with  adequate facilities and

v      a lunch room

[This is required especially during disaster  when staff may have to be on duty for long hours at a stretch].

Communication  Room (Main Message Room)

[The existing police wireless system continues to be in contact with  the reorganised DCR].

In addition, the following facilities are available in the communication  room

v      Telephones

v      Fax

v      Intercom units for contact  within the Collectorate

v      VSAT connection to the Divisional Commissioner and  EOC in Mantralaya 

v      Civil Wireless Network upto Tahsildar level

v      One PC with modem and  printer

v      Mechanical typewriter

v      Mobiles and Pagers (where available and necessary)

v      Photocopying machine

During disaster, hotlines from communication room to be connected to

Ø           Divisional Commissioner

Ø           EOC at Mantralaya

Ø           Superintendent of Police of the district

Ø           Civil Surgeon  of the district

Ø           Site Operations Centre

Separate tables are provided for each communication instruments such as 

v      VSAT

v      telephones

v      fax

v      computer

v      printer

v      typewriter

v      wireless

The phones, i.e. intercom, STD phone, EPBX extension, hotline etc., are of different colours, and with distinct rings if possible, to enable them to be distinguished from each other. An emergency light,  fire extinguishers, and a generator  for the computer and fax machine are also  provided in the communication  room.

Desk Requirements

Each of the desks have

v      an independent phone with STD facility

v      intercom units for contact  within the Collectorate  for all Desk Officers  in DCR and  Officers-in-charge from line departments and other agencies  at the district level

v      hotline for all Officers-in-charge to be connected to their respective agencies/departments.

v      Office space for secretarial facility has to be clearly demarcated.

[These telephones with STD facilities will be installed in DCR and kept in working condition under lock and key during normal circumstances].

Transport

Provision is made for a jeep with wireless communication assigned to DCR during normal times. Additional vehicles will be requisitioned as per the requirements during the emergency.

Staffing requirements for DCR

Three categories of staff are suggested for the DCR: Regular Staff for Communication Room,  Staff -on-call and Staff on Disaster Duty.

Regular Staff

The regular staff will be posted permanently in the DCR which will be responsible for manning the Communication  Room on a 24-hour basis.

The regular staff would include the following:

v      Desk  Officer - Communication  Room  

A  Deputy Collector from the Collectorate   will function as the Desk  Officer - Communication Room.  He will be in charge of the day-to-day operation of the Communication Room during official working hours. He will be assisted by officers of the rank of  Naib Tahsildars and Awal Karkuns  from the Collectorate  in rotation during non-working hours.

v      Communication  Room Assistant

The person holding this position will be the key person of the DCR and will be of the rank of an Awal Karkun. He will always be physically present in the Communication  Room.  He will be responsible for processing all messages and information received and maintained by the Communication Room and communicating the same to the Desk Officer and Collector.

v      Stenographer

The person holding this position will provide all secretarial assistance to the Communication Room. The person should be computer literate and should be able to operate  database systems.

v      Communication  operators (for 24 hours)

The communication operator will attend to wireless set as well as the VSAT connection in the Communication Room.

v      Driver cum Messenger/Attendant (for 24 hours)

Drivers will be required for the vehicle attached to the DCR and kept on stand-by duty. These drivers should also be trained to operate the wireless fitted in the vehicle attached to the DCR.

Staff-on-call

Staff-on-call will be available for immediate duty in case of a disaster.

Two Deputy Collectors will make up the Staff -on-call.  During a disaster, these officers will always be available "on call".

The staff-on-call will be appointed in rotation from some identified departments.  The rotation period could be of at least a month, to ensure some degree of continuity.

Staff on Disaster Duty

Staff on Disaster Duty will be required to shoulder additional responsibility in the case of a disaster. This, additional staff will be in the nature of a reserve   and may be drawn from various departments.  During normalcy, this staff  will not be called on to perform any duty in the DCR. This staff will be responsible for managing the desk arrangements mentioned earlier.

The departmental officers nominated as “Officer-in-Charge” from the concerned line departments and other agencies will be available in the DCR during the disaster period. 

Departments have appointed the   senior-most District Officer of  the department as “Officer-in-Charge”.

The Collector, Additional Collector, Assistant Collector, Resident Deputy Collector,  all  Deputy Collectors, SDOs and Tahsildars  are familiar with the functioning of DCR.

Officers-in-Charge drawn from various line departments and agencies will be provided orientation through training  programmes to be organised by YASHADA.

Multi-district  Disasters

In case of  disasters which have an impact on more than one district in a division the role of the Divisional Commissioner  comes into prominence . The Commissioner’s responsibilities shall include exercising  general supervision over the work of preparation of contingency plan undertaken by the Collectors in his Division and also on the relief and rehabilitation operations in those districts.

At the Divisional Commissioner’s level all the state departments and agencies have a regional head. It is very practical  for the Divisional Commissioner to seek the support of these regional heads towards the commitment of regional resources to a disaster situation.

For a disaster in more than one district (within or across the division), the role of Divisional Commissioner is to:

v      provide a unified command through inter-district control room

v      ensure need-based  resource allocations amongst districts

v      seek the support of regional heads of line departments for relief

v      Direct and Coordinate in response to requirements from district control room the services  of 

Ø           MSRTC

Ø           State Government  departments

Ø           SRP, CRPF, Home Guards, Coast Guards, CPWD, CISF

Ø           Fire Brigade, Civil Defence

Ø           Telecommunications

v      maintain a close liaison with the EOC

v      seek  policy guidelines, if necessary

v      Mobilise  services of Central/State government laboratories and recognised research centres for specialised services

In such a situation, the Divisional Commissioner  will act

v      as  the Additional Relief Commissioner for the disaster area,

v      his powers will be analogous to that of Relief Commissioner in the EOC.

Ø           will access funds from the State Government for this purpose

Ø           will be assisted by Deputy Commissioner, Revenue in  discharge of disaster

           management functions as is the normal practice.

Ø           will receive the support of other Deputy Commissioners and Assistant Commissioners

        and Line Department Heads.

[The district control rooms would continue to function in their respective districts and perform all the functions as per the DDMAP].

RESPONSE STRUCTURE

Planning Assumptions

v      The multi-disaster response plan  takes a generic approach to disaster situations to identify information requirements along with communication, coordination, monitoring and institutional arrangements.

v      The overall response structure remains constant irrespective of the type of disaster.

v      The flow chart  indicate the chain of command that should be set in motion in order to manage the disaster.

Coordination Structure on Occurrence of Disaster

Key Officials of various Departments

            Sr.No.     Designation of Distt. Heads                         Tel No.&Fax        

                                                                                        Office  Res.    Fax

            1.         Collector                                              55300  55200  55400

            2.         Addl. Collector                                     56101  56050  55400

            3.         R.D.C.                                                 55400  55291  55400

            4.         Distt. Suplly Officer                                         52272  51250

            5.         Chief  Executive Officer, Z.P.                         56401  55868 

            6.         Dy.Cheif Executive Officer,Z.P.                      55592  52517

           

            7.         Agricultural Development officer                     53019  52230

            8.         Distt. Health Officer                                        53275  52281

            9.         Distt. Animal Husbandary Officer                   50240  --

            10        Principal Agricultural Officer (T.&V.)               53997  52708

            11.       Distt.Supdt.Of Police                          55100  55202  55800

            12.       Police Control Room                                      51200 

            13.       Conservation of  Forest (North)          56279  50548  55548

            14.       Conservation of Forest (South)                      55289  56717

            15.       Civil Surgeon                                                   52103  50301

            16.       Supdt.Engg. MSEB(O&M)                              51298  56031 

            17.       Executive Engg. MSEB (O&M)                       55542  50463

            18.       Executive Engg. MSEB(RS Dn.)                    56514  52303

            19.       Cheif Engg. (Generation,O&M) CTPS 20393 20801  55641

            20.       Dy. Chief Engg. (Generation,O&M)CTPS      20504  20803

            21.       Dy. Cheif Engg. MSEB Civil Construction      20690 56041

                        CTPS                                                              20342

            22.       Supdt. Engg. MSEB (HVDC CTPS)               20635  20296

            23        Dy. Cheif Engg. MSEB (Genration Project)   20692  20021

           

            24.       Divisional Controller (MSRTC)                       55972  55108

            25.       Supdt. Engg. PWD Circle                               55231  55651

            26.       Executive Engg. PWD Dn.No.1                      50245 

            27.       Executive Engg. PWD Dn. No.2                     52256  55758

            28.       Executive Engg. Jaljivan Pradhikaran             50597  52575

            29        Asst .Charity Commissioner                          55427 

            30        Asst. Commissioner Food & Drugs               55612  52526

            31.       Dy. Dir. Fishiries                                             55042  55221

            32        Dy. Dir. of Town Planning                               50860 

            33        Dy. Dir. of Husbandary Poly                           51320

            34        Dy. Dir of Horticultre                                       51413

            35        Dy. Dir. of Geology & Mining               52635  52636

            36        Dy. Dir of Social Conservation                       53691

            37        Dy. Registrar Co-op society                           50381  52282

            38        Distt. Maleria Officer                                       53331

            39        Distt. Adult Education Officer             54237

            40        Distt. Inspector of Lanmd Record                  52739

            41        Dy. Transport Officer                                      55372  50081

            42        Distt. Stastastical Officer                                50322

            43        Distt. Sports Officer                                        53498

            44        Dy. Dir. Of  Social Forestery                          51317  53318

            45        Social Walefare Officer No.1                          53198  53424

            46        Indian Institute of Youth Walefare                   55928

            47        Tribal Walefare Officer                                   51217

            48        Nehru Yuwa Kendra                                        52242  52205

            49        Gen Manager DIC                                           52208

            50        Regional Manager M.S. Co-op                        50413  50044

            51        Executive Engg. MIDC                                    87201  55268

            52        Distt. Inspector Of Land Record                     52139

            53        Supdt. Land Record                                        55414.                                    

Involvement and Assistance available to Departments from Private Sector/Academic Institutions

Police Department

The following colleges have NCC and NSS volunteers who can help the police.

            Sr.No.  Name of College         Name of  Principal, Address   No.of                    Volunteers

                                                                        Tel.No.             NCC                NSS

            1.         Chandrapur  Engg.     Shri.K.R.Dikshit ,Ballarsha     --                      46

                        College                        Road Babupeth.  53493         

                                                                                        54549

            2.         Sardar Patel                V.S. Ainchwar,Ganj Ward       216                  200

                        College                        Chandrapur        55778

                                                                                       55226

            3.         Narayan Rao Patil       Y.P.Rothod,Civil Line              --                      100

                        Wasade College         Chandrapur.

            4.         Dr.Ambedker College     I.T. Tembhre,Chahare        52                    150

                                                            wadi,Pathanpura  56080

            5.         Janata Mahavidyalaya   P.M.Verma, Civil Line,           52                    --

                                                            Chandrapur.       55661

            6.         N. H. College               Prinipal Brahmapuri.               42                    55

                                                                                       72033

            7.         Dr.Ambedkar College   Principal, Bramhapuri           55                    42

                                                                                       72066

            8.         G.W. College Nagbhir    D.S. Jangle, New Sharda    --                      150                                                                                 colony.     6661

                                                                                        72065

            9.         Anand Niketan College   P.L. Shende,vidyanagri       110                  42

                        Warora.                           Warora           82006          

            10.       Athwale College of      Sanjay P.P.,Gurudev ward    87                   57

                        Social work                 Chimur.               65744

                                                                                        65561                                 

Following is  a list of timber merchants who can provide firewood for disposal of dead bodies.

            Sr. No.             Name                          Address                                   Tel.No.

            1.         Hemant bamboo depot           Kotwali Ward,                         52965

                        Prop. S.N. Thakrey                 Chandrapur.                            51585

            2.         Patel Timber Industries           C-17 ,Industrial Estate            52595

                                                                        Mul Road,Chandrapur.            53595

            3.         P.R.Patel                                 Laxmi Nivas                            51595

                                                                        Patrakar Nagar,

                                                                        Chandrapur.

            4.         Vishwanath Trimbak               Ekori Ward,Chandrapur

                        Kalaskar Fire wood stall.

            5.         Tapase Fire Wood Stall.         Near sapana talkies,

                        Anandrao Tapase.                  Sarai ward,Chandrapur.

            6.         Kishore Tajane Fire                Near Ekori Mandir,

                        Wood Stall                              Ekori ward,Chandrapur.

            7.         Baba Vishwakarma                 Near MSEB shed ,Industrial

                        furniture and Timber               Estate,Chandrapur.

                        Prop.Tapas Sukumar Pal.

            8.         Tapase Wooden Stall             Behind Masjid,Ganj Ward,

                        Prop. Vasudev Balaji               Chandrapur.

                        Tapase.

            9.         Shah Timber Depot.               By -pass Road, Bangali Camp,

                        Prop.Nimai Shah                     Chandrapur.

            10.       S.G. Trivedi Fire Wood           Jatpura Gate ,Chandrapur

                        Stall.

                        Prop. S.G. Trivedi.

            11.       Das Timber Works                 Near Police Chowki,Bangali camp,

                        Prop.Hari Manmohandas        Chandrapur.

            12.       M/s. B.D. Gautre                     Vivekanand Nagar,Wadgaon,

                        Prop.B.D.Gautre                     Chandrapur.

            13.       P.W.Patel                                Allapalli Road,Ballarpur.          40354

            14.       Swastik Timber Suppl.                       --do--                            40295

                        Prop.N.G. Aggrawal

            15.       Tulsiram Joshi                                                --do--                           40669

PWD

The names and addresses of contractors with the details of equipments,available with them.These contractors can help in repairs of roads, bridges and buildings, construction of relief camps, clearance of debris etc.       

                        Sr.No.  Name                          Address           &Tel.No.          Equipment                                                                                                                               Available

1.         Aditya Construction.         Shastri Nagar,Mul Road                              Poclain- 2

            Prop.H.M.Sancheti           Chandrapur,                         54916            Exavator-2

                                                                                                  52960            Tipper-10

                                                                                                                         Rollers-2

                                                                                                                         Water Tanker-2

2.         R.K. Sancheti                    Shastri Nagar,Mul Road                              Poclain-2

            Prop.V.K.Sancheti            Chandrapur.                         52057             Exavator-2

                                                                                                   54174             Tippers-10                                                                                                                                                                    51146              roller-2

                                                                                                                          W.tanker-2

3.         National Construction        Civil Line,                                                    Tippers-10

            Company.                          Chandrapur.                                                truck-5                     

            Prop.Girish Thakker                                                      55112               Rollers-5

                                                                                                                          Hotmix Plant-1

                       

4.         Shri. Gajanan Constr.         Civil Line,                                                    Exavator-2

            Company.                           Chandrapur.                       54186              Tipper-6

            Prop.C.N.Wasade                                                         51868              Roller-2

                                                                                                                           Hotmix Plant-1

                                                                                                                           Truck-4

5.         Seth Constr. Company.      Commercial Complex,                              Excavator-2

            Prop.Yashpal Seth.             Gandhi Chowk,                                          Roller-1

                                                        Chandrapur.                       52228              Tipper-4

                                                                                   

6.         Ajwani Constr. Company.   MIDC Ghugus Road,                                 Exavator-2

            Prop.G.H. Ajwani                 Chandrapur.                                               Roller-2

                                                                                                                           Hotmix Plant-1

 

7.         P.G.Trivedi                           SBI Colony,Chandrapur                            Poclain-2

                                                                                                                           Tipper-3

                                                                                                                           Roller-2

                       

8.         George Constr. Co.              9-C, Shastrinagar,                                   Roller-2

            Prop.K.J.George                   Chandrapur.                        55461           Tipper-4

                                                                                                      53115           Truck-4        

                                                                                                                           Mixer-4        

9.         Kalika Parasad Gupta    Gandhi Chowk,                                               Roller-1

                                                    Ballarpur.                                   40607           Truck-2

                                                                                                      40507           tipper-2

                                                                                               

10.       Laxmi Contr. Co.              Rajura.                                       22011         Exavator-1                                                                Prop.Laxman Gupta                                                                               Roller-2

                                                                                                                           Truck-4

                                                                                                                           Tipper-3

Agricultural Department

The Wholesalers of Seeds in Chandrapur District are as under

       Sr.No.       Name                                      Address                                   Tel.No.

            1.         Kisan Krishi Seva Kendra       Sarafa Line,Chandrapur         55106

                        Prop. K.R. Mamidwar                                                             55916

            2.         Adarsh Krishi Kendra              Girnar Chowk,Kasturba Road,54429

                        Prop. G.N. Regundawar                     Chandrapur.

            3.         Adarsh Krishi Kendra              Nehru Chowk,Warora             82176

                        Prop.G.N. Regundwar

            4.         Kasikar Krishi Seve Kendra    Main Road,Warora                  82083

                        Prop.Satish Kasikar                                                                82134

            5.         Avinash Krishi Kendra            Main Road,Gadchandur          46730

                        Prop.S.R.Chillawar                 Tah.Rajura.                             22513

            6.         Bandaly Krishi Kendra            Nehru Chowk, Main Road       22177

                                                                        Rajura.                                                22577

            7.         Deepak Krishi Kendra             Station Road, Brahmapuri      72273

                        Prop.Deepak Urade

            8.         Chandak Agro Centre             Main Road ,Rajura                  22285

                        Prop.Rajendra Chandak

            9.         Diwase Agro Industries           Chanda Co-op. Indl. Estate    54338

                        Prop.G.S. Diwase                   Mul Road Chandrapur.

            10.       Noorani Fertilizers                   Bazar Chowk, Ngbhir              6673

            11.       Pawan Krishi Kendra              Opp.Bank Of India,Bhadrawati   65167

                        Prop.Pandurang Bartine

            12.       Prashant Krishi Kendra          Allapalli Road, Gondpipri         56354

                        Prop.Ramchandra Sharma                                                    56364

            13.       Suyog Krishi Kendra               Near Gram Panchayat, Ghugus  75656

                        Prop. Suresh Bobde 

R.T.O

The following is a list of Private Bus Owners in Chandrapur district

            Sr.No.  Name of  Travels        Address                                   Tel.No.   No.of Buses

            1.         Ganraj Travels            Jatpura Gate , Chanrapur.      51518       6

                        Prop.G.Trivedi                                                             53518

            2          Hindusthan Travels     Haveli Complex, Chandrapur  54007       6

                        Prop.Kabeer Siddiquie

            3.         Banish Travels                        Jatpura Gate, Chandrapur           2

                        Prop. Shakeel  Ahmad           

            4.         Chawla Travels           Near Sapana Talkies, Chandrapur          4

            5.         Royal Travels              Jatpura Gate, Chandrapur                       2

            6.         Om Shri Sai Travels   Jail Ward Chandrapur             55307       2

                        Prop.V.K. Gadiwan                                                     50819

            7.         Mahakali Travels         New Indira Gandhi Statue,Chandrapur    2

                        Prop. Baban Singh

                        Thakur

            8.         Sirmoriya Tours &       Khristanand  Chowk, Brahmapuri  72834   2

                        Travels

                        Prop. Shashichandra Chawla

            9.         Anand Travels             Anand Dressess,Bazar Ward                 2

                                                            Chandrapur.

            10.       Satkar Travels             Nagbhir Road,Brahmapuri      72666       2

                        Prop.Ti Tu Chawla

            11.       Babu Goverdhan Travels        Near Old Bus Stand,Warora.       2

                                                                                                                             32              

List of Private Transporters in the district is given below :

            Sr.No.  Name                          Adress & Tel.No.                     No.of Vehicles

                                                                                                            Available

            1.         Aneja Transport          Shastrinagar Chandrapur       Trucks-5

                        Carporation.                                        22269

                        Prop.Satish Kumar Aneja

            2.         Bhagyashri Road        Bapat Nagar,Chandrapur        Truck-6

                        Lines.                                                  56232

            3.         Biyabani Transport      Haidrabad Road,Rajura.         Truck-4

                        Services.                                             22038

                        Prop.J.M.Biyabani

            4.         Bombay Chanda         Lakhmapur,Nagpur Road,      Truck-8

                        Road Carriers             Chandrapur.    53138

            5.         Bombay M.P. road      Civil Line,Chandrapur.            Truck-8

                        Ways.                                                  50559

                        Prop.Mahendra Tuli                             56484

            6.         Chaddha Transport.    Bangali Camp, Bye Pass       Truck-10

                        Prop.Satish Chaddha Road,Chandrapur.      55079

            7.         Chandrapur                 Padoli Ghugus Road,              Truck-7

                        Transport Co.              Chandrapur.    87249

                        Prop.K.Mamidwar                               54053

            8.         Ghotra Transport        Yashwant Ngar,Padoli,           Truck-6

                        Prop.R.S.Ghotra         Chandrapur.    87721

            9.         Kumar Transport        Civil Line,Chandrapur             Truck-4

                        Prop.S.Riyazzuddin                            51606

            10.       Modern Coal Services              Jain Complex Lakhmapur,    Truck-15

                        Prop.Naresh Gupta       Chandrapur.  56119

            11.       Jaswant Singh                        Civil Line,Chandrapur.            Truck-8

                        Transport                                            52897

            12.       Jiwani Road Lines       Bapat Nagar,Chandrapur        Truck-7

                        Prop.Ejaz Ali                                       52900

                                                                                    53800

            13.       Jyoti Road Ways.        Yashwant Nagar, Padoli,        Truck-7

                        Prop.N.V.Dholkiya       Chandrapur.    87323

            14.       Rahul Transport.         Yashwant Nagar, Padoli         Truck-15

                        Prop.LalBhai Mehta     Chandrapur.    87387

            15.       Roopam Roadways    Civil Line,Chandrapur             Truck-10

                        Prop.Abbas Bahi                                 55877

            16.       Taj Road Ways           Lakhmapur,Padoli,                  Truck-8

                        Prop.Rafik Bhai           Chandrapur.    52919

                                                                                    54179

            17.       Wadi Golden               Opp.Patel High School,          Truck-5

                        Transport.                   Chandrapur.    53760

                        Prop. Fakhry Bhai

            18.       Patel Road Ways        Bapat Nagar,Chandrapur        Truck-10

                        Prop.Chakrawarty                               53578

            19.       Arco Road Ways        Balaji Ward,Chandrapur.        Truck-12

                        Prop.Suresh                                        51360

Health Department

                                    List of Private Doctor’s with their speciality

            Sr.No.  Name                          Address                       Tel.No. Speciality

            1.         B.D. Paliwal                Mahakali Temple,        55078              Anaesthetists

                                                            Chandrapur.                52283

            2.         K.B. Jain                      Kasturba Road,           51955              --do--

                                                            Chandrapur

            3.         Sanjiv Dhande             Tukum,Chandrapur     54471              --do--

                                                                                                53371

            4.         Ashok Wasalwar         Civil Line,Chandrapur 54411              Cardiologist

                                                                                                55422

            5.         D.S. Wasnik                Jatpura Gate,              51527              --do--

                                                            Chandrapur.                54773

            6.         Anil Tipre                     Gandhi Chowk,           52053      Dental Surgeon.

                                                            Chandrapur                 51245

            7.         Harish Salphade         Opp.Z.P.,Chandrapur 53834              --do--

                                                                                                56131

            8.         Shyam Gundawar       Opp.Church,               54240              --do--

                                                            Chandrapur.                54848

            9.         Sunita Mundhda          Jatpura Gate,              54560              --do--

                                                            Chandrapur                 56231

            10.       Sushil Mundhda          --do--                           --do--               --do--

            11.       Ajit Sanghai                 Main Road,                  53369        Dermatologists

                                                            Chandrapur.

            12.       M.K. Bhagwat              Jatpura Gate,              55139              --do--

                                                            Chandrapur.

            13.       Kishor Dhande            Jatpura Gate,              53532              E.N.T. Surg.

                                                            Chandrapur.                51358

            14.       Pramod Mahajan         Chota Bazar,               53246              --do--

                                                            Chandrapur.                51382

            15.       B.N.Kallurwar              Jatpura Gate,              52121              Eye

                                                            Chandrapur                 51707

            16.       Prakash Mamidwar     Opp.Main Hospital,      51031              --do--

                                                            Chandrapur                 51033

            17.       Rekha Dandekar         Hospital Ward,            51155              --do--

                                                            Chandrapur.                56355

            18.       Ashok Bhugte              Mul Road,Chandrapur 52553              General Surg.

            19.       Vasudeo Ninawe         Kasturba Road,           54884              --do--

                                                            Chandrapur.                54994

            20.       K.D. Shatrakar            Bazar Ward,               51321      Gynaecologist

                                                            Chandrapur                 52197      & stericians

            21.       Kavita Gandhi              Civil Line,Chandrapur 51133              --do--

                                                                                                54106

            22.       Kirti Sane                    Jatpura Gate,              55730              --do--

                                                            Chandrapur.                55731

            23.       Mrudula Dewaikar       Civil Line,Chandrapur 52287              --do--

            24.       Rajlaxmi  MRS            Bus Stand,                  56220              --do--

                                                            Chandrapur.                51580

            25.       Reema Ninawe           Kasturba Road,           54884              --do--

                                                            Chandrapur.                54994              --do--

            26.       Snehlata Salphade      Opp.Z.P.,Chandrapur 50131              --do--

                                                                                                56131

            27.       Ajay Dudhalwar           Hospital Ward,            54151      Orthopaedic Surg.

                                                            Chandrapur.                55151

            28.       I.S. Patiyal                   Near Rly.Crossing,     53247              --do--

                                                            Belewadi,Chandrapur 54128

            29.       Pramod Raut              Bhawanji Bhai High     51344              --do--

                                                            School,Chandrapur     51355

            30.       Arun Kulkarni               Tukum Chandrapur     50621              Paediatricians

                                                                                                55912

            31.       Gopal Mundhda           Jatpura Gate,              53131              --do--

                                                            Chandrapur.                53306

            32.       M.J.Khan                     Opp.Z.P.,Chandrapur 53544              --do--

                                                                                                56544

            33.       Aparna Sonwalkar       Opp.Z.P.Chandrapur. 50163              Pathologists

                                                                                                52133

            34.       Nita Dhande                Jatpura Gate,              53532              --do--

                                                            Chandrapur.                53937

            35.       Pramod Bangde          Shriram Market,          55120              --do--

                                                            Chandrapur                 55520

            36.       Ram Ninawe               Hospital Ward,            54884              --do--

                                                            Chandrapur.

            37.       Bharti Mundhda           Sarafa Line,                 53306      Psychiatrist

                                                            Chandrapur                 53131

            38.       Kiran Deshpande        Jatpura Gate,              52201              --do--

                                                            Chandrapur.

            39.       Anil Mdurwar               Chota Bazar,               50233      Radiologists

                                                            Chandrapur.                53054

            40        Nawal Rathi                 Jatpura Gate,              51975              --do--

                                                            Chandrapur

            41        R.N. Bhalme               Near LT.V.School,       52771              --do--

                                                            Chandrapur.                54146

            42.       Zullurwar                     Kasturba Road,           52096              --do--

                                                            Chandrapur.                55520

            43.       Arun Sainani                Near S.P. College,      53939    General Surgeons

                                                            Chandrapur.                52828

                       

                                                                                               

            44.       Mahavir Soitkar           Opp. Z.P.,                    53383              --do--

                                                            Chandrapur.                53384

            45.       S.V. Salphade             --do--                           56131              --do--

                                                                                                50131.

Animal Husbandry

                                    List of  Veternary  Institutions

            Sr.No.  Name of Panchyat      Name of Veternary  Dispensaries  No of Veternary

                        Samiti                          Grade-I                                           Auxilary Centre.

                                                                                                                        Grade-II

            1.         Chandrapur                 1.Ballarpur                                           9

                                                            2.Pandharkawada

            2          Mul                               1.Mul                                                    3

                                                            2.Rajoli

                                                            3.Gadisurla

            3.         Saoli                                 --                                                     7

            4.         Sindewahi                   1.Sindewahi                                        4

                                                            2.Nawargaon

            5.         Nagbhir                        1.Nagbhir                                             9

                                                            2.Talodhi

            6.         Brahmapuri                 1.Brahmapuri                                      9

                                                            2.Ahergaon

            7.         Warora                        1.Warora                                             3

                                                            2.Chargaon

                                                            3.Shegaon

                                                            4.Madheli

            8.         Bhadrawati                  1.Bhadrawati                                       8

                                                            2.Chandankheda

            9.         Chimur                                    1. Chimur                                            12

                                                            2.Shankarpur

            10.       Gondpipri                     1.Gondpipri                                          13

                                                            2.Thogaon

            11.       Rajura                         1.Rajura                                              11

                                                            2.Virur Station

                                                            3.Dewada

            12.       Korpana                      1.Korpana                                           10

                                                            2.Gadchandur

                                                            26                                                        98

District Industries Officer

The following industries associations will help the District Industries Officer

1)   Maharashtra Industrial Development Corporation Industries Association-

                                    Shri  Madhusudan Rungata, President,

                                    MIDC Ghugus road , Chandrapur.      Tel. No.: 1)51297 2)54915

2)     Co-operative Industrial Estate Association-

                                    Smt. Fatima Bohara - President,

                                    Mul road, Chandrapur. 

Earthquakes

Planning Assumptions

Earthquakes have large spatial and temporal impacts. Resource requirements are both  intensive and extensive for management of earthquakes, in terms of  the number of agencies involved and the nature of coordination required.

Lead Agencies

v      The lead  agencies involved in the management of earthquakes are revenue, police,  fire, and medical services.

v      Due to extensive damage to infrastructure, the Telecommunication, MSEB, MWSSB and Public Works Departments play an important role in the management of this disaster.

v      As a result of earthquakes, floods and epidemics can also occur.  Therefore stress is laid on measures taken to ensure coordination with health and irrigation departments. 

Nature of Damages

The impact of earthquakes differs for urban and rural areas, primarily because of the nature of infrastructure, quality of housing and occupational differences. In rural areas, it is primarily the housing and physical structures (including irrigation infrastructure) which may suffer extensive damage, without necessarily destroying the crops.

In urban areas, in addition to housing and physical infrastructures, it may also disturb the service infrastructure such as water supply, sewage, telephones, electricity etc., which are essentially underground installations and hence exposed to a direct impact.

Possible Impacts

v      Effects on Individual

Ø           Loss of Life

Ø           Injuries demanding surgical  needs

Ø           Family disruption

Specific demands raised or required 

Ø            Orthopedic surgery and fractures needing treatment

Ø            Individuals trapped under debris need to be located and rescued which calls for not only earth moving equipments, but the services of sniffer dogs.

Ø            Expertise of fire brigade and defence services may be essential in the rescue operations.

Ø            In case of separation of family members information counters  play an important role.

Ø            In case of family disruption resulting from death of major earner, economic rehabilitation of the family may have to be planned as a long-term strategy.

Ø            Loss of life, property and livestock may require damage assessment procedures to avoid litigations and delays in gratuitous relief and compensation.

v      Damage caused

Ø           Houses                                                                                                                    

Ø           Personal Belongings                                                                                                                   

Ø           Livestock 

Specific demands raised or required

Ø            Partially damaged houses needs technical inspection to decide the habitation worthiness and the extent of repairs required.

Ø            Certain partially damaged houses may require demolition.

Ø            As far as possible, reconstruction will take place on the same sites to avoid delays, secure cultural continuity and avoid costly land purchase. In extreme situations,  new sites for resettlement may have to be identified when removal of rubble and debris is non-viable.

Ø            Salvaging personal belongings from the debris needs clearance from technical personnel to ensure safety of persons engaged.

Ø            As far as possible, family members only will be permitted to salvage their individual family belongings.

v      Damage to infrastructure resulting in disruption of services

Ø           Buildings

Ø           Dams                                                                                                                       

Ø           Bridges                                                                                                                    

Ø           Road Surface and Rail Lines                                                                                                                

Ø           Power Stations                                                                                                                            

Ø           Water pipelines and water tanks                                                                                                           

Ø           Sewer lines                                                                                                                                 

Ø           Underground Cables                                                                                                                   

Specific demands raised or required

Ø            Care needs to be taken to ensure that all electrical supplies to damaged area are disconnected promptly by MSEB.

Ø            Underground cables need thorough inspection before power is restored.

Ø            Breaches or cracks in the dam need Irrigation Department to secure the breaches or grouting the cracks.

Ø            In case of damage to bridges, relief operations may require temporary bridges which can be put up with the assistance of army.

Ø            Certain roads needing resurfacing will need immediate action from PWD.

Ø            MWSSB in consultations with health authorities should restore  existing water supply with necessary repairs. This may call for replacement of pipelines or arrangements for storage in portable PVC water tanks.

Ø            In some cases, restoration of existing water supply may be time-consuming and therefore water tankers may have to be pressed into service.

Ø            Identification of nearby water sources and checking water’s  potability  may also be required.

Ø            Damage to sewer lines is to be looked into. Alternate arrangements by way of temporary latrines (technical details given on Pg. No ) may have to be constructed.

Ø            Extensive damage to residential buildings resulting in disruption of telecommunication facilities requires provision/installation of public telephones (PCO) to facilitate communication.

Ø            Damage to hospital, school buildings and other public facilities may disrupt the services. In such a case restoration of services through temporary arrangements is the first priority.

Ø            PWD may have to take repairs or reconstruction of such public facilities on a priority basis.

v      Environmental Effects                                                                                                                

Ø           Alteration in river and stream flow

Ø           Liquefaction                                                                                                                                 

Specific demands raised or required

Ø            Areas indicating signs of liquefaction should be declared out of bounds and strict vigil should be kept by police to prohibit  trespassing.

Ø            Foundations of the building in the area prone to liquefaction need technical assessment.

Ø            Alteration in river and stream flow particularly when it covers a settlement create immediate demands for evacuation and relief till such time that the areas for new settlement identified and rehabilitation works are executed.

v      Economic and Social consequences                                                                                                              

Ø           Loss of livelihood                                                                                                                         

Ø           Disruption of market and Loss in production

Ø           Migration                                                                                                                  

Ø           Disruption of social structure including breakdown of social order and organisations

Ø           Law and order problem                                                                                                               

Ø           Psychological after-effects such as individual trauma and depression                                                                                                   

Specific demands raised or required

In addition to immediate relief requirements for effective and early recovery process, checking migration

Ø            restoration of production units, and employment avenues

Ø            provision of individual counselling and community counselling

Ø            Reconstruction of social structures and organisation of community requires participation of non-governmental organisations District administration must invite or coopt voluntary agencies to ensure this aspect.

Ø            For combating depression, engage people in all possible activities related to relief and rehabilitation through a deliberate strategy of community participation.

v      Secondary effects                                                                                                                       

Ø           Fires                                                                                                                         

Ø           Rains                                                                                                                       

Ø           Landslides                                                                                                                                   

Specific demands raised or required

Ø            Fires resulting from earthquake are essentially a result of damage to infrastructure such as power supply.

Ø            Immediate service of fire brigade is essential to check further damage.

Ø            Immediate discontinuation  of power would restrict the possibility of occurrence to a large extent.

Ø            Rains following earthquakes essentially disrupt rescue and relief operations. Rescue and relief teams therefore must prepare themselves in anticipation and get community cooperation to overcome such difficulties.

Ø            Rains also have implication for storage of food, fuel for cooking (firewood or coal) and fodder for the cattle. Protective structures therefore for the storage of all relief material becomes essential. Plastic materials and water-proof containers are required.

Ø            Damage to road access due to landslides needs immediate clearing and PWD has to keep itself prepared for such an eventuality.

Ø            Settlements on the hill-slope prone to landslides need to be shifted to safer places.

Floods

Planning Assumptions

Ø           Floods occur with warning, while flash flood occur with very little warning. 

Ø           Flood prone areas in India are demarcated as either blue or red lines depending on the frequency of occurrence.  Blue lines are those areas where floods can occur once every five years whereas red lines are areas where floods can occur once every hundred years.

Ø           The resource requirements for management of flood is extremely intensive involving large scale mobilization of resources.

Lead Agencies

Ø           The lead  agencies are the revenue, police,  irrigation,  and medical services.

Ø           Extensive damage to infrastructure and public utilities is possible hence the role of  supporting agencies such as MSEB, Telecommunications and PWD  is crucial.

Ø           The loss to crop or plantation demands involvement of Agriculture Department, ZP

Ø           Loss of cattle will bring in the role for Animal Husbandry, ZP.

Ø           The assistance and intervention of the EOC is essential to support the district administration  in the management of these disasters.

Ø           Additionally, secondary disasters such as epidemics  may be caused due to floods and must be monitored by Public Health Department.

Possible Impacts

v      Effects on Individual

Ø           Loss of Life

Ø           Injuries demanding medical attention

Ø           Water-borne infection

Specific demands raised or required

Ø            In most cases, orthopedic surgery, fractures, cuts and bruises need immediate attention.

Ø            Cases of water-borne infection need medication.

Ø            Mass immunisation, when  necessary, to  protect individuals from  water-borne diseases.

Ø            Marooned individuals, including those  trapped on tree-tops and building terraces  need to be located and rescued which calls for boats, or at times helicopter services.

Ø            Alternatively when large sections of community are marooned instead of evacuation it may be necessary to organise dispatch of relief supplies to marooned locations. This creates a special need for transport facility.

Ø            Expertise of fire brigade and defence services  may be essential in the rescue operations.

v      Impact at family level                                                                                                                  

Ø           Separated families                                                                                                                      

Ø           Missing persons                                                                                                                          

Ø           Family disorganisation

Specific demands raised or required

Ø            In case of separation of family members information counters would play an important role.

Ø            In case of family disruption resulting from death of major earner, economic rehabilitation of the family may have to be planned as a long-term strategy.

Ø            Loss of life, property and livestock may require damage assessment procedures to avoid litigations and delays in gratuitous relief and compensation.

v      Damage caused

Ø           Houses                                                                                                                    

Ø           Personal Belongings                                                                                                                   

Ø           Livestock                                                                                                                  

Ø           Crops and plantations

Ø           Land

Specific demands raised or required

Ø            Partially damaged houses needs technical inspection to decide the habitation worthiness and the extent of repairs required.

Ø            Certain partially damaged houses may require demolition.

Ø            As far as possible, reconstruction should take place on the same sites to avoid delays, secure cultural continuity and avoid costly land purchase. In extreme situations,  new sites for resettlement may have to be identified when removal of rubble and debris is non-viable.

Ø            Salvaging personal belongings from the debris needs clearance from technical personnel to ensure safety of persons engaged.

Ø            As far as possible, family members only should be permitted to salvage their individual family belongings.

Ø            Damage to crops, plantations or agriculture land will need a long-term intervention.

v      Damage to infrastructure and disruption of services                                                                                  

Ø           Buildings

Ø           Godowns and storages

Ø           Dams                                                                                                                       

Ø           Bridges                                                                                                                    

Ø           Road Surface and Rail Lines                                                                                                                

Ø           Power Stations                                                                                                                            

Ø           Water pipelines and water tanks                                                                                                           

Ø           Sewer lines                                                                                                                                 

Ø           Underground Cables                                                                                                                   

Ø           Ports and Jetties                                                                                                                         

Ø           Communication Lines

Specific demands raised or required

Ø             Care needs to be taken to ensure that all electrical supplies to damaged area are disconnected promptly by MSEB.

Ø             Underground cables need thorough inspection before power is restored.

Ø             Damage to electric poles and transmission lines needs restoration.

Ø             Breaches or cracks in the dam need Irrigation Department to secure the breaches or grouting the cracks.

Ø             In case of damage to bridges, relief operations may require temporary bridges which can be put up with the assistance of army.

Ø             Certain roads needing resurfacing will need immediate action from PWD.

Ø             Roads blocked due to uprooting of trees and electric poles may need to be cleared on a priority basis.

Ø             MWSSB in consultations with health authorities should restore  existing water supply with necessary repairs. This may call for replacement of pipelines or arrangements for storage in portable PVC water tanks.

Ø             In some cases, restoration of existing water supply may be time-consuming and therefore water tankers may have to be pressed into service.

Ø             Identification of nearby water sources and checking the potability of the same may also be required.

Ø             Damage or choking of  sewer lines is one of the most ticklish issue. Alternate arrangements by way of temporary latrines (technical details given on Pg. No ) may have to be constructed.

Ø             Extensive damage to residential buildings resulting in disruption of telecommunication facilities requires provision of public telephones (PCO) to facilitate communication.

Ø             Damage to hospital, school buildings and other public facilities may disrupt the services. In such a case restoration of services through temporary arrangements is the first priority.

Ø             PWD may have to take repairs or reconstruction of such public facilities on a priority basis.

Ø             Disposal of damaged foodgrains is one of the major step and needs community cooperation.

Ø             Provision for distribution of cooked food or dry rations may have to be made.

v      Environmental Effects                                                                                                                

Ø           soil erosion                                                                                                                                  

Ø           silting                                                                                                                        

Ø           water pollution                                                                                                                             

Ø           denudation of land

Ø           increase in salinity

Specific demands raised or required

Ø             Silting in residential areas and buildings is one of the major problems requiring extensive community involvement.

Ø             NGOs have demonstrated a tremendous capacity to mobilise community participation in desilting operations for reoccupancy of the residences and also the wells providing drinking water.

Ø             Agriculture department may have to undertake soil-testing and propose appropriate measures for restoration of agriculture land.

v      Economic and Social consequences                                                                                                              

Ø           Loss of livelihood

Ø           Disruption of market and Loss in production                                                                                                    

Ø           Migration                                                                                                                  

Ø           Disruption of social structure including breakdown of social order

Ø           and community organisations                                                                                                     

Ø           Law and order problem                                                                                                               

Ø           Psychological after-effects like depression,  trauma etc.

Specific demands raised or required

In addition to immediate relief requirements for effective and early recovery process and  checking migration

Ø             restoration of production units, and employment avenues

Ø             provision of individual counselling and community counselling

Ø             Reconstruction of social structures and organisation of community requires a professional intervention which can best come from non-governmental organisations Voluntary agencies will have to be invited or coopted for relief activities to ensure this aspect.

Ø             For combating depression, engage people in all possible activities related to relief and rehabilitation through a deliberate strategy of community participation.

v      Secondary effects                                                                                                                       

Ø           Epidemics                                             

Ø           Landslides

Specific demands raised or required

Ø             Rescue and relief teams  must be alert to the possibility of outbreak of epidemics and therefore ensure standards of services with respect to storage, cooking, and handling of food materials as also disposal of waste in relief camps, medical centres and feeding centres.

Ø             Water-quality monitoring mechanisms will have to be set-up to prevent  outbreak of epidemics.

Ø             Rains also have implication for storage of food, fuel for cooking (firewood or coal) and fodder for the cattle. Protective structures therefore for the storage of all relief material becomes essential. Plastic materials and water-proof containers are required.

Ø             Damage to road access due to landslides needs immediate clearing and PWD has to keep itself prepared for such an eventuality.

Ø             Settlements on the hill-slope prone to landslides need to be shifted to safer places.

Epidemics

Planning Assumptions

Ø           The existing  water quality monitoring and vector control programmes reduces the possibility of spread of epidemics to a considerable extent.

Ø           Efficient response from  pathological and testing laboratories helps in early diagnosis of the possible epidemic.

Lead Agencies

Ø           The revenue and health department inlcuding the medical service is the main agency involved in disaster management during epidemics.

Ø           In the case of  epidemics accompanying floods the water supply and sanitation department, MWSSB and  irrigation department are the support agencies

Ø           Apart from these support services, assistance is also sought from the police and home guards, public works department, state transport and the media.  

Possible Impacts

v      Effects on Individual

Ø           Loss of Life

Ø           Diseases needing Epidemiological Treatment

Specific demands raised or required

Ø             Mass immunisation, when necessary,  to  protect individuals.

Ø             In some cases, existing water supply may be contaminated and therefore water tankers may have to be pressed into service.

Ø             Identification of nearby water sources and checking the potability of the same may also be required.

Ø             Rescue and relief teams  must be alert to the possibility of spread  of epidemics and therefore ensure standards of services with respect to storage, cooking, and handling of food materials as also disposal of waste in relief camps, medical centres and feeding centres.

Ø             Water-quality monitoring mechanisms will have to be set-up to prevent  spread  of epidemics.

Ø             In case of vector-borne diseases, the exact vector and related control methods will have to be followed. The required materials are listed on (pg. No)

Ø             Life-saving drugs including saline will be required in large quantities

Ø             Disposable kits for treatment of affected people and arrangements for proper disposal of these.

Ø             Personal protection kits for medical personnel and volunteers assisting in treatment of patients.

Ø             Arrangements for disposal of personal belongings and other solid waste materials.

Ø             Monitoring arrangements including testing facilities with the help of laboratories and hospitals.

v      Economic and Social consequences                                                                                                              

Ø           Migration

Ø           Evacuation

Ø           Law and order problem                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    

Ø           Psychological after-effects especially isolation                                                                                                                 

Specific demands raised or required

In addition to immediate medical relief requirements for effective and early recovery process and  checking migration

Ø           restoration of potable water supply 

Ø           provision of

Þ          quarantine of infected cases at family and hospital level

Þ          programme of immunisation

Þ          water quality monitoring

Þ          pathological testing laboratories

Þ          individual counselling

Þ          family counselling

Ø           Involvement of  NGOs in mobilising community efforts for the control of epidemics by ensuring  standards of environmental sanitation, disposal of waste and personal hygiene.

Road Accidents

Planning Assumptions

Ø           The major road accidents are highly localised.

Ø           The response machinery that is to be activated is at a much more local level

Ø           In case of road accidents involving toxic and highly inflammable materials, there is  need for temporary evacuation.

Lead Agencies

Ø           The lead  agencies are  revenue, police and the regional transport office.

Ø           In   major accidents involving  loss of life and injuries to  a large number of people, services of  agencies such as fire services, health department   will be needed

Ø           In the case of a vehicle plunge in the river,  services of divers for rescue operations are required.

Possible Impacts

v      Effects on Individuals

Ø           Loss of Life

Ø           Trauma Care

Ø           Burns

Ø           Injuries demanding surgical treatment

Ø           Poisoning or exposure to toxic material

Specific demands raised or required

Ø             In most cases, orthopedic surgery and fractures need immediate attention.

Ø             Individuals trapped in the vehicles need to be rescued which at times calls for metal cutting devices.

Ø             Expertise of fire brigade and defence services may be essential when the accident involves vehicles carrying hazardous chemicals, toxic materials or explosives.

Ø             Divers may be required if the accident involves a vehicle falling off a bridge into water.

Ø             The  police may require to cordon off the area.

Ø             Chemical accidents may generate a demand for treatment for burns and exposure to poisonous substances which may mean a specialised service not generally available along the highways.

Ø             Nature of injuries may demand immediate transfer of injured to centres offering trauma care.

Ø             Loss of life, property and goods may require damage assessment procedures to avoid litigations and delays in gratuitous relief and compensation including insurance.

v      Damage caused

Ø           Vehicles

Ø           Goods

Specific demands raised or required

Ø           Salvaging the goods from the accident site needs clearance from technical personnel to ensure safety of persons engaged.

v      Environmental Effects                                                                                                                

Ø           Air pollution if vehicle carrying hazardous chemicals are involved

v      Disruption of services                                                                                                                

Ø           Road network

Ø           Traffic

Specific demands raised or required

Ø             The spills from vehicles carrying hazardous materials may require stoppage of traffic and cleaning of road surface. Various materials are recommended depending on the nature of spill. Also, specialised  agencies may have to be called for undertaking spill cleaning operations.

Ø             Diversion of traffic resulting from such accidents may require traffic control to give information  at various entry points located also far away (which need quick identification) from the site of accident so as to avoid inconvenience to the travellers.

Ø             Special cranes may be required for clearing the accident site.

v      Economic and Social consequences                                                                                                              

Ø             Law and order problem                                                                                                                     

Specific demands raised or required

Ø             Security of goods and materials in the vehicles involved in the accident needs protection. The details of goods need to be officially recorded.

v      Secondary Effects                        

Ø           Fires

Ø           Gas leak affecting settlements near the accident site

Specific demands raised or required

Ø             It may be necessary to inform the settlements around to take necessary precautionary measures, if the accident involves leakage of toxic gases.

Ø             It may be advisable to send a team of medical personnel from poison centres to visit the settlements around the accident site when toxic leak is reported.

Fires

Lead Agencies

Ø           The main agencies involved in disaster management are the revenue department, local fire service (municipality or municipal corporation), medical services (hospitals) and police (local police station),

Ø           In the event of a major fire, the local fire service would need to co-ordinate with the MSEB and the  water supply department for assistance in containment of the fire.

Ø           Major evacuation may  call for support from DCR.

Possible Impacts

v      Effects on Individuals

Ø           Burns

Ø           Injuries demanding surgical treatment

Ø           Loss of Life

Specific demands raised or required

Ø            Serious burn cases may need immediate transport for admission  to burn wards in the hospital

Ø            In many  cases, panic behaviour may lead to injuries requiring treatment for orthopedic surgery and fractures.

Ø            Expertise of fire brigade  may be essential in the rescue operations and control of fire particularly when population density is very high.

Ø            In case of separation of family members information counters would play an important role. (This is normally observed in case of fires in large slums)

Ø            In case of family disruption resulting from death of major earner, economic rehabilitation of the family may have to be planned as a long-term strategy.

Ø            Loss of life, property and livestock may require damage assessment procedures to avoid litigations and delays in gratuitous relief and compensation.

v      Damage caused

Ø           House                                                                                                                      

Ø           Personal Belongings                                                                                                                   

Specific demands raised or required

Ø             Partially damaged houses needs technical inspection to decide the habitation worthiness and the extent of repairs required.

Ø             Certain partially damaged houses may require demolition.

Ø             Transit arrangements may have to be identified when the structure needs reconstruction.

Ø             Salvaging personal belongings from the debris needs clearance from technical personnel to ensure safety of persons engaged.

Ø             As far as possible, family members only should be permitted to salvage their individual family belongings.

v      Damage to infrastructure and disruption of services                                                                                  

Ø           Buildings                                                                                                                  

Ø           Overhead lines                                                                                                                            

Ø           Communication Lines

Specific demands raised or required

Ø             Care needs to be taken to ensure that all electrical supplies to damaged area are disconnected promptly by MSEB officials in the area.

Ø             Underground cables need thorough inspection before power is restored.

Ø             Extensive damage to residential buildings resulting in disruption of telecommunication facilities requires provision of public telephones (PCO) to facilitate communication.

Ø             Damage to hospital, school buildings and other public facilities may disrupt the services. In such a case restoration of services through temporary arrangements is the first priority.

Ø             PWD may have to take repairs or reconstruction of such public facilities on a priority basis.

Ø             Some fires may demand traffic control measures including identification of alternate routes and diversion of traffic.

Ø             In congested areas controlling curious onlookers may block movement of rescue and fire workers. The police will need to cordon off the area for smooth operations.

v      Economic  consequences                                                                                                                    

Ø           Loss of livelihood                                                                                                                         

Ø           disruption of market                                                                                                                    

Ø           loss in production                                                                                                                        

Specific demands raised or required

In addition to immediate relief requirements for effective and early recovery process,

Ø           restoration of markets, production units, employment avenues

Ø           Provision of damage assessment

Industrial  and Chemical Accidents

Planning Assumptions

Ø           Off-site industrial accidents are in the form of fires, explosions and toxic gas leaks.

Ø           The responsibility of declaring an industrial accident as off-site rests with the management of the industrial unit where the accident has occurred.

Ø           The most crucial decision  in off-site industrial accident management is the recognition / identification of the stage at which the  responsibility is handed over from the  management to the public authorities.

Ø           The public authority will be  the District Collector when the disaster is likely to impact a larger area.

Lead Agencies

The main participating agencies in the management of off-site industrial disasters are :

Ø           revenue

Ø           police, fire, medical services

Ø           civil defence agencies

Ø           public works department

Ø           Industry

Ø           MARG

Ø           Public Health and regulatory environmental agencies.

Ø           To enable effective immediate response, specialists are required to

¨       provide fast, reliable information on the properties of the substance released,

¨       its potential hazard,

¨       protective equipment required,

¨       containment and control measures to be taken and

¨       advice on the decontamination and emergency termination activities required.

Possible Impacts

v      Effects on Individual                                                                                                                   

Ø           Loss of Life

Ø           Burns

Ø           Injuries demanding Surgical  treatment

Ø           Exposure to  toxic material

Specific demands raised or required

Ø             In most cases, orthopedic surgery and fractures need immediate attention.

Ø             Expertise of fire brigade, mutual aid and response groups (MARG), may be essential.

Ø             The  police may require to cordon off the area.

Ø             Chemical accidents may generate a demand for treatment for burns and exposure to poisonous substances which may mean a specialised service  not generally available with medical practitioners.

Ø             Nature of injuries may demand immediate transfer of injured to poison centres.

Ø             Loss of life, property and goods may require damage assessment procedures to avoid litigations and delays in gratuitous relief and compensation including insurance.

Ø             Areas indicating spread of toxic gases should be declared out of bounds and strict vigil should be kept by police to prohibit  trespassing.

Ø             Alteration in  wind direction when  it covers a settlement create immediate demands for evacuation and relief till such time that an all-clear signal is given.

v      Environmental Effects                                                                                            

Ø           water pollution                                                                                                                             

Ø           air pollution

Ø           effect on vegetation

Specific demands raised or required

Ø             On a long-term basis monitoring of air, water  and soil quality will have to be carried out.

v      Disruption of services                                                                                                                

Ø           Road network                                                                                                                              

Ø           Electricity                                                                                                                 

Ø           Water supply                                

v      Economic and Social consequences                                                                                                              

Ø           Loss of livelihood                                                                                                                         

Ø           Disruption of market

Ø           Damage to food stocks                                                                                                               

Ø           Loss in production                                                                                                                       

Ø           Migration                                                                                                                  

Ø           Law and order problem                                                                                                               

Ø           Social and Psychological effects                                                                                                          

Specific demands raised or required

In addition to immediate relief requirements for effective and early recovery process and  checking migration

Ø             restoration of production units, employment avenues

Ø             provision of individual counselling and community counselling

Ø             For combating depression, engage people in all possible activities related to relief and rehabilitation through a deliberate strategy of community participation.

Cyclones

Planning Assumptions

Ø      Cyclones can be predicted sufficiently in advance but its impact location over land is uncertain.

Ø      The resource requirements for management of cyclone impact  is extremely intensive involving large scale mobilization of resources.

Lead Agencies

Ø      The lead  agencies are the Fire, Police and Health departments.

Ø      Extensive damage to infrastructure and public utilities is possible hence the role of  supporting agencies such as MSEB, Telecommunications and PWD  is crucial.

Ø      The loss to crop or plantation demands involvement of Agriculture Department

Ø      Loss of cattle will bring in the role for Animal Husbandry.

Ø      The assistance and intervention of the EOC is essential to support the district administration  in the management of these disasters.

Ø      Additionally, secondary disasters such as epidemics  may be caused due to floods resulting from cyclones  and must be monitored by Public Health Department.

Possible Impacts

v      Effects on Individual

Ø      Loss of Life

Ø      Injuries demanding surgical  needs

Ø      Family disorganisation

Specific demands raised or required

Ø      In most cases, orthopedic surgery, fractures, cuts and bruises need immediate attention.

Ø      Mass immunisation is necessary to  protect individuals from  water-borne diseases.

Ø      Marooned individuals, including those  trapped on tree-tops and building terraces  (in  case of tidal wave) need to be located and rescued which calls for boats, or at times helicopter services.

Ø      Alternatively when large sections of community are marooned instead of evacuation it

      may be necessary to organise dispatch of relief supplies to marooned locations. This

      creates a special need for transport facility.

Ø      Expertise of fire brigade and defence services (Navy, Coast Guards) may be essential in

      the rescue operations.

v      Damage caused

[Cyclones may be accompanied by heavy rains, or at times  tidal waves]. 

Ø      Houses                                                                                                                       

Ø      Personal Belongings                                                                                                                     

Ø      Livestock                                                                                                                    

Ø      Crops and Plantations

Ø      Forests

Specific demands raised or required

Ø      Partially damaged houses needs technical inspection to decide the habitation worthiness

      and the extent of repairs required.

Ø      Certain partially damaged houses may require demolition.

Ø      New sites for resettlement may have to be identified when removal of rubble and debris is non-viable.

Ø      Salvaging personal belongings from the debris needs clearance from technical personnel to ensure safety of persons engaged.

Ø      As far as possible, family members only should be permitted to salvage their individual family   belongings.

v      Damage to infrastructure and disruption in services

Ø      Buildings

Ø      Godowns and storages

Ø      Dams                                                                                                                         

Ø      Bridges                                                                                                                       

Ø      Road Surface and Rail Lines                                                                                                                   

Ø      Power Stations and Power Lines                                                                                                  

Ø      Water Tanks                                                                                                                                  

Ø      Ports and Jetties                                                                                                                            

Ø      Communication Lines

Ø      Railway Signals

Specific demands raised or required

Ø      Care needs to be taken to ensure that all electrical supplies to damaged area are

      disconnected promptly by MSEB.

Ø      Overhead lines need thorough inspection before power is restored.

Ø      Breaches or cracks in the dam need Irrigation Department to secure the breaches or

      grouting the cracks.

Ø      In case of damage to bridges, relief operations may require temporary bridges which

      can be put up with the assistance of army.

Ø      Certain roads needing resurfacing will need immediate action from PWD.

Ø      MWSSB in consultations with health authorities should restore  existing water supply

      with necessary repairs. This may call for replacement of pipelines or arrangements for

      storage in portable PVC water tanks.

Ø      In some cases, restoration of existing water supply may be time-consuming and

      therefore water tankers may have to be pressed into service.

Ø      Identification of nearby water sources and checking the potability of the same may also

      be required.

Ø      Choking of sewer lines is one of the most ticklish issue. Immediate  arrangements for

      clearing the sewer lines is necessary.

Ø      Piped gas supply should be immediately terminated in the affected area to avoid

      secondary consequences. If necessary, and feasible gas cylinders should be supplied till

      the gas line is checked thoroughly and  restored.

Ø      Extensive damage to residential buildings resulting in disruption of telecommunication

     facilities requires provision of public telephones (PCO) to facilitate communication.

Ø      Damage to hospital, school buildings and other public facilities may disrupt the services.

Ø      In such a case restoration of services through temporary arrangements is the first  

Ø      priority.

Ø      PWD may have to take repairs or reconstruction of such public facilities on a priority

     basis.

Ø      Disposal of damaged foodgrains is one of the major step and needs community 

     cooperation.

Ø      Provision for distribution of cooked food or dry rations may have to be made.

Ø      Rains also have implication for storage of food, fuel for cooking (firewood or coal) and  

     fodder for the cattle. Protective structures therefore for the storage of all relief material

     becomes essential. Plastic materials and water-proof containers are required.

v      Environmental Effects                                                                                                                

Ø      soil erosion                                                                                                                 

Ø      silting                                                                                                                          

Ø      water pollution                                                                                                                                

Ø      increase in salinity

Specific demands raised or required

Ø      Silting in residential areas and buildings is one of the major problems requiring extensive  

      community involvement.

Ø      NGOs have demonstrated a tremendous capacity to mobilise community participation in

     desalting operations for reoccupancy of the residences and also the wells providing   

     drinking water.

Ø      Agriculture department may have to undertake soil-testing and propose appropriate 

      measures for restoration of agriculture land.

v      Economic and Social consequences                                                                                                              

Ø      Loss of livelihood                                                                                                                           

Ø      Disruption of market and Loss in production                                                                                                       

Ø      Disruption of social structure including breakdown of social order

Ø      and community organisations                                                                                                       

Ø      Migration                                                                                                                     

Ø      Law and order problem                                                                                                                 

Ø      Psychological after-effects                                                                                                                      

Specific demands raised or required

Ø      In addition to immediate relief requirements,  for effective and early recovery process and  checking migration

Ø      restoration of production units and employment avenues

Ø      provision of individual counselling and community counselling

Ø      Reconstruction of social structures and organisation of community requires a professional

      intervention which can best come from non-governmental organisations Voluntary   

      agencies will have to be invited or coopted for relief activities to ensure this aspect.

Ø      For combating depression, engage people in all possible activities related to relief and rehabilitation through a deliberate strategy of community participation.

v      Secondary effects         

Ø           Epidemics         

Ø           Landslides

Specific demands raised or required

Ø      Rescue and relief teams  must be alert to the possibility of outbreak of epidemics and therefore ensure standards of services with respect to storage, cooking, and handling of food materials as also disposal of waste in relief camps, medical centres and feeding centres.

Ø      Water-quality monitoring mechanisms will have to be set-up to prevent  outbreak of epidemics.

Ø      Damage to road access due to landslides needs immediate clearing and PWD has to keep itself prepared for such an eventuality.

Ø      Settlements on the hill-slope prone to landslides need to be shifted to safer places.

Non-governmental Organisations (NGOs) and Voluntary Agencies

The non-governmental organisations and voluntary agencies play an important role in disaster management  and provide a strong band of committed volunteers with experience in managing the disasters. Their strength  lies in the choice of their manpower, the informality in operations and flexibility in procedures. These organisations enjoy a fair degree of autonomy and hence can respond to changing needs immediately.

The NGOs in Chandrapur district can be assigned specific locations and roles by the District Collector to undertake relief work within the overall institutional framework. There are 24 Non-governmental organisations which include traders organisations, Lions Clubs, Rotary Clubs, Christian Missionaries etc. The list of NGOs in the district with their specific nature of work, and specific roles of NGOs during disaster management is given in sections 8.1, 8.2 and 8.3. These NGOs would work in close co-ordination with the district administration and maintain the standards of services, information exchange and reporting requirements so as to enable the Collector to have a total picture of resource availability, disbursements and requirements.  As and where possible, NGOs may also be able to improve the quality of delivery of welfare services in the camps organised and manned by administration.

 List of NGOs and specific assistance available from them

            Sr.No.              Name of NGO’s                      Resources Available

            1.                     Gujrati Samaj Mandal              1.Manpower

                                    Chandrapur.                            2. Cooked Food

                                                                                    3.Utencils

            2.                     Sanmitrta Mandal,Samadhi    1.Volunteers

                                    ward Chandrapur.                   2.Cooked Food

                                                                                    3.Medicines

                                                                                    4.Ambulance

                                                                                    5.Blood Bank

            3.                     Lok Seva & Vikas Sanstha     1.Ambulance

                                    Near Sai Baba Mandir,            2.Clothings

                                    Chandrapur                             3.Godown

            4.                     Jain Seva Mandal                    1.Volunteers

                                    Kasturba Road,                       2.Cooked Food

                                    Chandrapur                            

            5.                     Vishwabharti Khadi                 1.Clothing

                                    Gramodaya Sanstha,              2.Blankets

                                    Chandrapur                            

            6.                     Chandrapur Vyapari Mandal   1.Food Grains

                                                                                    2.Utencils

                                                                                    3.Cooked Food

                                                                                    4.Clothing

                                                                                    5.Temporary Shelter

            7.                     Chandrapru Social Academy  1.Volunteers

            8.                     Rotary Club Of Chandrapur    1.Clothing

                                                                                    2.Volunteers

                                                                                    3.Cooked Food

                                                                                    4.Temporary Shelter

            9.                     Rotary Club Of Chanda Fort               --do--

            10.                   Lions Club Of Chandrapur                  --do--

            11.                   Indian Medical Association      1.Clothing

                                    Chandrapur Branch                2.Volunteers

                                                                                    3.Cooked Food

                                                                                    4.Temporary Shelter

                                                                                    5.Medicines

            12.                   Maharogi Seva Samiti,                        --do--

                                    Anandvan, Warora

            13.                   Rotary Club Of Warora           1.Clothing

                                                                                    2.Volunteers

                                                                                    3.Cooked Food

                                                                                    4.Temporary Shelter

            14.                   Lokseva Mandal Bhadrawati   1.Clothing

                                                                                    2.Cooked Food

            15.                   Jain Shwetamber Mandal,      1.Volunteers

                                    Bhadrawati                              2.Food Grain

                                                                                    3.Godown

            16.                   Veer Savarkar Mandal,            1.Volunteers

                                    Rammandir Ward,Warora.     2.Food Grains

            17.                   Vyapari Sanghatna,Warora    1.Food Grain

                                                                                    2.Utencils

                                                                                    3.Clothings

            18.                   Azad Hind Mandal,Warora      1.Volunteers

            19.                   Nagvidharbha Charkha           1.Clothings

                                    Sangh,Mul                               2.Blankets

                                                                                    3.Bedshits

                                                                                    4.Temporary Shelter

            20.                   Gurudev Seva Mandal ,           1.Volunteers

                                    Neri, Tah.Chimur                    2.Cooked Food

                                                                                    3.Utencils

            21.                   Ballarpur Seva Samiti             1.Volunteers

                                    Ballarpur.                                 2.Cooked Food

                                                                                    3.Clothing

            22.                   Khristanand Misionary            1.Medical Services

                                    Brahmapuri                             2.Medicines

                                                                                    3.Ambulance

            23.                   Surabhi, Nagbheer                  1.Volunteers

                                                                                    2.Food Grains

            24.                   Lions Club,Sindewahi             1.Volunteers

                                                                                    2.Cooked Food

NGOs to be involved in specific activities during disaster management

      operations

                               a)  Search and rescue :

                                    1. Rotary Club Chandrapur.

                                    2. Rotary Club Warora.

                                    3. Lions Club Chandrapur.

                                    4. Chandrapur Vyapari Mandal.

                                    5. Grudeo Seva  Mandal  Chimur.

                                    6. Surabhi Nagbhid.

                                    7. Lions Club Sindewahi.

                                    8. Rotract club of Chandrapur

                                    9. Jaycees club of Chandrapur

                              b)  Medical Aid :

                                    1. Indian Medical Association, Chandrapur.

                                    2. Red Cross Society of India, Chandrapur Branch.

                                    3. Sanmitra Mandal Blood Bank, Chandrapur.

                                    4. Ankur Hospital Blood Bank, Chandrapur.

                                    5. Lok Seva Vikas Samiti, Chandrapur.

                              c)   Disposal of Dead Bodies :

                                    1. Safai Kamgar Sangh, Nagar parishad, Chandrapur.

                            d)     Temporary Shelters :          

                                    1. Contractor Association Chandrapur.

                                    2. Rotary Club Chandrapur.

                                    3. Rotary Club Warora.

                                    4. Maharogi Seva Samiti, Anandwan, Warora.

                                    5. Nagvidharbha Charkha Sangh,Mul.

                                    6. Chandrapur Vyapari Mandal.

                                    7. Lions Club Chandrapur.

                              e) Carcass Disposal :

                                    1. Safai Kamgar Sangh, Nagar Parishad, Chandrapur.

                                    2. Safai Kamgar Sangh, Nagar Parishad, Ballarpur.

                               f) Relief Activities :       

                                    1. Gujrati Samaj Mandal, Chandrapur.

                                    2.  Jain Seva Mandal, Chandrapur.

                                    3. Red Cross Society of India, Branch Chandrapur.

                                    4. Indian Medical Association, Branch Chandrapur.

                                    5. Rotary Club Chandrapur.

                                    6. Lions Club Chandrpaur.

                                    7. Rotary Club Warora.

                                    8 Lions Club Sindewahi.

                               g) Health and Sanitation :        

                                    1. Indian Medical Association Chandrapur.

                                    2. Nagar Parishad Karmachari Sangh, Chandrapur.

                                    3. Safai Kamgar Sangh, Nagar Parishad,Chandrapur.

                                    4. Congress Seva Dal, Chandrapur.

                                h) Cattlecamps :

                                    1. Gorakshan Sabha, Chandrapur.

                                         Shri. Surendra Dave, President.   Tel.No.55255

Encouraging Community Preparednessi

Disasters may result in cutting off essential services and in spite of administrative preparedness it may not be possible for the administration to reach out immediately.

Mitigation efforts and  preparation of the disaster management action plan for local areas are essential elements and pre-requisites. Preparedness to a large extent would reduce the impact and the damage. Training and simulation exercises for enhancing the community’s preparedness and response capability will simultaneously strengthen and enhance the capacity of the administration to undertake necessary preparedness or evacuation measures. The district administration is  encouraging and supporting initiatives towards community preparedness measures including formation of Community Emergency Response Teams (CERTs).

On the basis of discussions, apart from the NGOs mentioned earlier, the following Private Sector units, Mahila Mandals and CBOs have been identified as resource groups for involvement in community preparedness measures. They will all undergo training for the same. These Private Sector units, Mahila Mandals,  CBOs, NGOs would adopt a conscious effort towards community level preparedness measures. They would also promote the formation of CERTs.

As a part of general preparedness at  community level, the families in the community would be made conscious about the type of hazard that the household situation presents and the threats  from outside. Also, communities would be encouraged to undertake exercises in risk and vulnerability analysis and preparation of community response plan to possible disasters.  Thus local local disaster management action plans for hot-spot areas in the context of specific vulnerability would be developed. For areas with high concentration of industries MARGs have been set-up, whereas for areas prone to other types of disasters Community Emergency Response Teams (CERTs) are being set-up. Special efforts have also been taken to involve Sugar Co-operatives towards Community Preparedness Measures.

Private Sector Units in Sindhudurg

Industrial Estates and Associations

There are the following industries associations in Chandrapur District

1)   Maharashtra Industrial Development Corporation Industries Association-

                                    Shri  Madhusudan Rungata, President,

                                    MIDC Ghugus road , Chandrapur.      Tel. No.: 1)51297 2)54915

2)     Co-operative Industrial Estate Association-

                                    Smt. Fatima Bohara - President,

                                    Mul road, Chandrapur. 

Cooperative Organisations

There is one Chandrapur Zilla Dudh Utpadak Sahkari Sangh in the district.

            Number of  talukawise Co-operatives under this sangh are as under.

                        Sr. No.             Taluka                         No. of Co-operative Society

                        1.                     Chandrapur                             9

           

                        2.                     Bhadrawati                              2

                        3.                     Gondpipri                                 2

                        4.                     Sindewahi                               7

                        5.                     Mul                                           8

                        6.                     Saoli                                        4

                        7.                     Brahmapuri                             14

                        8.                     Nagbheer                                26

                        9.                     Warora                                    14

                        10.                   Chimur                                                7

                        11.                   Rajura                                     6

List of CBOs (Mahila Mandals and Yuvak Mandals) who will work towards community preparedness measures

                                                List  Of  Yuvak  Mandals

            Sr.No.              Taluka             Name of Yuvak Mandal

            1.                     Chandrapur     TrisharanYuvak Mandal,Krishna Nagar,

                                                            Chandrapur.

            2.                     Chandrapur     Ekta  Krida Mandal, Chandrapur.

            3.                     Chandrapur     Pathanpura Vyam Shala Mandal,

                                                            Pathanpura, Joddeul Chandrapur.

            4.                     Chimur                        Young Star Yuvak Sanskrutik Krida

                                                            Mandal, Neri.

            5.                     Chimur                        Yuva Chetana Gram Vikas & Krida Mandal,

                                                            Vadhona.

            6.                     Chimur                        Vidharbha Institute of Rural Youth

                                                            Development , Neri.

                                    Talukawise  List  of  Mahila  Mandal

            Sr.No.              Taluka             Name of Mahila Mandal

            1.                     Chandrapur     Rani Laxmibai Mahila Mandal, Chandrapur.

            2.                     Chandrapur     Adarsh Mahila Mandal,Chandrapur

            3.                     Chandrapur     Rashtriya Mahila Sikshan Mandal,

                                                            Chandrapur.

            4.                     Chandrapur     Mahila Seva Samiti,Mahatma Gandhi Road,

                                                            Chandrapur.

            5.                     Chandrapur     Sarvodya Mahila  Mandal,Chandrapur.

            6.                     Chandrapur     Rani RajkunwarBhagini Samaj, Chandrapur.

            7.                     Chandrapur     Sanyukt Mahila Manch,Chandrapur.

            8.                     Chandrapur     Savitri Bai Phule Vidya Prasarak Mahila

                                                            Mandal, Chandrapur.

            9.                     Brahmapuri     Bhagini Mandal, Brahmapuri

            10.                   Chimur                        Sharda Mahila Mandal, Shivan Payali.

Mutual Aid and Resource Groups (MARGs)

There are 14 factories in Chandrapur district which either manufacture or store and use as raw material some kind of hazardo8us materials like chlorine, hexane, ammonia etc. It has been estimated that about 9% of the total population of the district lives close to these hazardous factories and is likely to be affected by any major accidnets in these factories.

There is need for setting up Mutual Aid and Response Groups in the settlements around these hazardous locations

The objective of setting up MARGs in these areas are

·         Make the industrial zone self-sufficient

·         Encourage pooling of resources to tackle industrial accidents

·         Manage both on-site and off-site industrial accidents

·         Provide for a degree of expertise in managing disasters

·         Reduce the response time for managing disasters

·         To integrate the on-site plan of industries with an off-site plan.

·         Assist the district administration in managing disasters

Guidelines for the formation of MARGs are given in Annexure I.

There already exist the following industrial associations,

1)   Maharashtra Industrial Development Corporation Industries Association-

                                    Shri  Madhusudan Rungata, President,

                                    MIDC Ghugus road , Chandrapur.      Tel. No.: 1)51297 2)54915

2)     Co-operative Industrial Estate Association-

                                    Smt. Fatima Bohara - President,

                                    Mul road, Chandrapur. 

Community Emergency Response Teams (CERTs)

In most disasters, community members are the first to respond before any outside assistance can reach the disaster site. Therefore in certain disaster prone areas a group of young volunteers or Community Emergency Response Teams are being formed and trained to undertake essential tasks which would reduce loss of life and property and at the same time build  confidence in self-management. Essentially CERTs would contribute in the following areas:

1.     Organising  training and preparedness exercises at the community level

2.     Ensuring family preparedness on the receipt of warning

3.     Ensuring communication links both within the community and with administration

4.     Controlling rumours and panic behaviour and undertaking confidence building activities

5.     Mobilising youth and able-bodied persons from the community to provide volunteers support, wherever required

6.     Organising local work teams for immediate rescue, and relief e.g. cooked food, first aid, assistance in law and order

7.     Assisting the handicapped who need special help

8.     Facilitating movement of relief teams during evacuation and relief and ensuring appropriate tagging as and when necessary

9.     Guarding major installations and evacuated properties till the administration takes over.

These CERTs  are expected to support the efforts of the Gram Panchayat and Tahsildar.

Villages where CERTs can be formed

Chandrapur district has a recurrent problem of floods. There are many flood prone villages along the major rivers and in almost all the tahsils – the list is given in Section III. Such “Community Emergency Response Teams” need to be formed in these flood prone villages.

Areas of Community Participation

Administration and NGOs at the disaster site should ensure  maximum  community participation in all stages of operation in order to maintain community morale and confidence, maximise the use of local resources, reduce costs of operation and promote a faster recovery. It is important to note that the so-called “victims” are not all that helpless and offer a tremendous manpower resource and ingenuity to overcome the crises. Disaster management situations offers a wide range of choice and demands a immediate decision making. The participation of communities and their representatives would reduce the pressures on administration with regard to the choice and uncertainties of community’s response to the decision-making process.

Based on local dynamics, ethos and the experience of the Latur earthquake, an appropriate strategy to ensure community support has been evolved. Such efforts to enlist community support and participation have gone a long way in reassuring the community about the administration’s intent and seriousness about managing the disaster.

Efforts to enlist community participation is being ensured by

v      identifying situational, opinion and position leaders in the community and voicing administration’s confidence in their capabilities to undertake the tasks.

v      Consultations and dialogues expressly indicating the need for assistance would encourage the community and its leaders to come forward.

v      Regular feedback meetings and an open book approach to demonstrate  transparency.

v      Involving community  in decision making at local levels

The major areas of community participation are being identified and include the following :

During Evacuation

For appropriate security and law and order evacuation would be undertaken with assistance from community leaders and community based organisations (CBOs).

The entire family would evacuate together as a unit. However, to avoid stampede and confusion and in cases of inadequate transport or limited time, emergency evacuation would be undertaken in the following order :

·         seriously injured and sick   

·         children,  women and handicapped

·         Old

·         Able-bodied

For emergency evacuations , the families would be encouraged to take along water, food, clothing and emergency supplies to last at least three days. 

In addition, the families would be encouraged to assemble the following kit.  

·         Adeqaute supply of water in  closed, unbreakable containers.

·         Adequate supply of non-perishable packaged  food and dry rations

·         A change of clothing and rain gear.

·         Blankets and bedsheets, towels

·         Buckets, Plates and mugs made of plastic

·         Soap, toothbrushes, toothpaste

·         A battery-powered radio, torch, lantern, matches

·         Cash and jewellery

·         Personal medicines

·         A list of important family documents including ration card, passport, bank passbook address/telephone book (of relatives), certificates, driving licence, property documents, insurance documents etc.

·         Special items including foods, for infants, elderly or disabled family members.

People would be asked to shut off electricity and water at main switches and valves before leaving. 

People would be asked to listen to a battery-powered radio and follow local instructions.

In other cases, people would be advised to  follow these steps:

·         Wear protective clothing.

·         Secure their homes.  Close and lock doors and windows.

·         Turn off the main water valve and electricity

·         Leave early enough to avoid being trapped.

·         Follow recommended evacuation routes.  Not to  take shortcuts.  They may be blocked.

·         Not to move into flooded areas. 

·         Stay away from downed power lines.

·         Animals may not be allowed in public shelters. With respect to livestock, community would be instructed to set the livestock  free before evacuating in order to avoid extensive loss of livestock. If possible, the community may be advised to carry the livestock along if the evacuation does not involve transportation by vehicles.

During the Disaster

Community  leaders would be responsible for ensuring the following community behaviour :

·         People stay calm and panic behaviour is not encouraged. Regulate helter-skelter running or crowding of people.

·         Encourage people to stay at a secured place and protect themselves from injuries.

·         People do not enter  damaged buildings or  structures or even their own houses

·         People do not  touch electric poles, utility wires/cables

·         People do not use telephones except in life-threatening situations

·         Preparedness of community  for recurrence of the disaster, increase in severity, or consequential emergencies

·         Check for injuries.  Do not attempt to move seriously injured persons unless they are in immediate danger of death or further injury. 

·         Undertake first-aid activities as per the guidelines given in preparedness and mitigation document of DDMAP

·         Visually inspect utility lines and appliances for damage.

·         If water pipes are damaged, shut off the water supply at the main valve.

·         People stay away from damaged areas, unless their assistance has been specifically requested by police, fire or relief organizations.

·         Mobilise people to put out small fires and people inside are made to evacuate.

·         People do not throw away any damaged goods until an official inventory has been taken. 

·         Help  police, if requested,   to maintain law and order  and watch the evacuated property during the disaster

During Relief and Rehabilitation

Immediately after the disaster, the members of the community may look depressed and helpless, but very soon gets euphoric when they find that after all everything is not lost. Participation of community at this stage helps in early recovery and promotes mental health. It is necessary to see that member of the community are continuously engaged in some sort of helping activity to draw them out of their depression.

Relief authorities at the site would therefore:

·         Encourage self-help in every activity of their day-to-day living.

·         Encourage assistance for location and identification of dead, disposal of dead bodies, disposal of carcasses  and disposal of damaged food stocks

·         Encourage contribution of labour (loading, unloading, distribution, temporary constructions, salvage and restoration of water supplies, Food distribution, relief camps, cattle camps etc.)

·         Enlist assistance for  updating  records of damages and losses.

·         Enlist assistance in maintenance of  law and order

·         Enlist assistance in maintaining sanitation standards and disposal of waste

·         Promote cultural and recreational activities in order to protect the mental health and sustain the ethical and moral values.

Encouraging Family Level Preparedness

In order to assist the families to prepare themselves, community education programme will be undertaken to acquaint members of the community with the nature of each disaster, the type of damage that can occur, the demands it would generate both at family and community level and the manner in which it will be responded to. Even with the best of planning, it is difficult to assess the exact impact of the disaster and the response time. Under the circumstances then, families have to prepare themselves for a prolonged period before the administration can reach them. Although collective efforts of the community can reduce the hardship to some extent a large part of the burden would be on the family itself. Hence families would be encouraged to check for the in-house hazards as also use the given emergency checklist and prepare itself accordingly.

Checking for in-house hazards

·        Encourage people to inspect their houses once every year to find and correct potential hazards such as any household items that can move, fall, break, or cause a fire.

·        Check for electrical hazards.

¨       Undertake repairs or replacement of hazardous cables, plugs, connections.

¨       Remove unwanted plug points or unused cables.

·        Check for combustible materials in the household

¨       Appropriateness of storage place (light, ventilation, heat and  reach of children)

¨       Appropriateness of containers  of flammable liquids such as kerosone/diesel (quality of material, quantity of material, covers, leakages)

¨       Precautions undertaken for managing the spills

·        Check for fire hazards.

¨       Separation of household goods from inflammable materials

¨       Separation of fuel from combustible materials

¨       Cleaning of valves, pressure stoves and supply points

Emergency Planning and Checklists

Families need to prepare themselves for any kind of disaster.  This would require specific information about emergency water and food and a recommended checklist of emergency supplies which will enable the family to sustain itself till adequate facilities for relief are organised.

Emergency checklist:

·         Find out which disasters could occur in the  area.

·         Ask how to prepare for each disaster.

·         Know the members of the CERT

·         Ask how warnings are given in an emergency.

·         Learn about the community's evacuation routes.

·         Learn about designated shelters

·         Ask about special assistance for elderly or disabled persons.

·         Learn about emergency plans at the workplace.

·         Learn about emergency plans for the  children’s school or day-care center.

Create an emergency plan:

·         Meet with household members. Discuss with children the dangers of  fire, severe weather, earthquakes and other emergencies.

·         Discuss how to respond to each disaster that could occur.

·         Talk to children about the likely disasters

·         It is easier for children to understand what is happening during a disaster if they already know what can take place. Point out that some of the disasters are indeed natural events and although they are dangerous, they do not have to be life-threatening if adequate precautions are taken. Try not to alarm the children in discussing possible disasters.

·         Teach children about the safety precautions for each disaster.

·         Learn how to turn off the water and electricity at main switches.

·         Create a network of relatives, friends or co-workers to assist the disabled in an emergency.

·         Provide for medical alert tags or bracelets to identify the handicapped person

Disaster supplies kit

·        For emergency evacuations , the families should be encouraged to take along adequate supply of water, food, clothing and emergency supplies. 

·        The families should be encouraged to assemble the  disaster supplies kit as described earlier.  

Evacuation Preparedness

When community evacuations become necessary, local officials would provide information to the public through the media.  Government agencies, and other disaster relief organisations would provide emergency shelter and supplies. 

The amount of time the families  have to evacuate will depend on the disaster.  If the event can be monitored, like a cyclone, families could have a day or two to get ready. But many disasters offer no time for people to gather even the most basic necessities.  This is why evacuation plan is necessary.

The checklist for emergency planning given above would be useful for evacuation planning as well.  Additionally, families should also get their disaster supplies kit organised for evacuation and follow the steps for evacuation as outlined earlier.

Shelter

Taking shelter is critical in times of disaster.  This may mean staying in an enclosed structure during a severe storm without electricity for days.

In many emergencies, local authorities would set up public shelters in schools, municipal buildings and places of worship.  While they often provide water, food, medicine and basic sanitary facilities, families should plan to have their own supplies as well. 

Living in Designated Emergency Shelters

1.      Stay in the shelter until local authorities say it's okay to leave.  The length of the stay can range from a few hours to few days.

2.      Restrict smoking to well-ventilated areas.  Ensure that smoking materials are disposed of safely.

3.      Cooperate with local authorities  and others staying in the shelter.  Living with many families  in a confined space can be difficult and unpleasant.

4.      Listen to  radio broadcasts.

5.      Watch for fires.

6.      Assist local authorities as volunteers in the management of water, cooked food and other relief supplies including medical care, if required

7.      Make arrangements for pets and cattle before going to a public shelter.  They  are not allowed in a public shelter due to health reasons.

8.      Organise recreation for children

9.      Assist local  authorities with the assistance of  community members to maintain law and order

Helping after Disaster

When disaster strikes, people everywhere want to help those in need. To  ensure that this compassion and generosity are put to good use, the media can highlight these facts:

·        Financial aid is an immediate need of disaster victims. Financial contributions should be made through local administration or a well-known voluntary organisation to help ensure that contributions are put to their intended use.

·        Before donating food or clothing, wait for instructions from local officials. Immediately after a disaster, relief workers usually don't have time or facilities to set-up distribution channels, and too often these items go to waste.

·        Volunteers should go through a well-known voluntary agency since these agencies will know what is needed and are prepared to deal with the need. Local authorities also coordinate volunteer efforts for helping in disasters.

·        Organisations and community groups wishing to donate items should first contact local officials, and voluntary agencies working on relief to find out what is needed and where to send it. Be prepared to deliver the items to different places, tell officials when you'll be there, but do not expect them to provide for  transportation, driver, and unloading.

Disaster Specific Family Preparedness Measures

Fires

[In addition to what has been listed under family preparedness as a generic response, fire accidents demand specific preparedness and responses. Given below are the preparedness measures and responses which are  specific to fire accidents].

Fire spreads quickly; there is no time to grab valuables or inform administration. Heat and smoke are even more dangerous than the flames; inhaling the super-hot air can sear the lungs.  Fire produces poisonous gases that make you disoriented and drowsy.  Instead of being awakened by a fire, it may induce a deeper sleep.

In case of fire know what to do, how to escape, how to safeguard the occupants. Have a plan.

Fire safety tips

·        Teach family members to stay low to the floor (where the air is safer in a fire) when escaping from a fire.

What to do during a fire

·        Use water to put out small fires.  Do not try to put out a fire that is getting out of control. Call the fire department. Make sure everyone knows how to call the fire department.

·        Never use water on an electrical fire. 

·        Smother oil and grease fires in the kitchen with baking soda or salt, or put a lid over the flame if it is burning in a pan.

·        If the clothes catch on fire, the person should stop, drop and roll until the fire is extinguished.  Running only makes the fire burn faster. Those assisting should pour water and not try to control it with bare hands.

·        Feel for heat near the top of the door before opening. If it's hot, don't open it unless it is an escape route. In such a case Feel the bottom of the door with the palm of your hand before opening it. If the door is cool, leave immediately.  Be prepared to crawl.  Smoke and heat rise, and the air is clearer and cooler near the floor.  If the door is hot, escape through a window. If escape is not possible, signal and call out for help, alerting the fire fighters.

·        Close doors of the rooms on fire. It will hold back the fire and keep out poisonous smoke until help arrives.

·        If escape is not possible, stay near the floor, where the  air is better. If all doors are closed, open a window for air. If   possible, stuff wet rags around doors to hold back smoke and heat.

·        Stay out. Do not, for any reason, go back into a burning house. If  someone is missing, tell the fire fighters.

What to do after a fire

·         Do not enter a fire-damaged structureunless authorities say it is okay.

·         When entering a fire-damaged structure, look for signs of heat or smoke.

·         Have an electrician check your household wiring before the current is turned on. 

·         Beware of structural damage.  Roofs and floors may be weakened and need repair.

·         Keep records of all clean-up and repair costs. 

·         Do not throw away any damaged goods until an official inventory has been taken. 

·         In case of tenancy, contact the landlord. 

·         Secure personal belongings or move them to another location.

·         Discard food  and medicines that have been exposed to heat, smoke or soot.

·         Do not try to open a safe or strong box.  It can hold intense heat for several hours.  If the door is opened before the box has cooled, the entering air combined with the high internal temperature can cause the contents to burst into flames.

·         If the local administration say the structure is unsafe and must be vacated :

¨       Ask local police or CERT volunteers to watch the property

¨       Take jewellery, cash, and financial records and other important documents.

¨       After vacating, notify the new residential address to friends, relatives, police and fire departments, delivery services, employers, schools and the post office

Earthquakes

[In addition to what has been listed under family preparedness as a generic response, earthquakes demand specific preparedness and responses. Given below are the preparedness measures and responses which are  specific to earthquakes].

The actual movement of the ground in an earthquake is seldom the  direct cause of death and injury. Most casualties result from falling objects and debris. Earthquakes also may trigger landslides and  generate huge ocean waves, each of which can cause great damage. There    are many actions which can be taken to reduce the dangers.

Preparing for an Earthquake

·        Prepare a home Earthquake plan

·        Choose a safe place in every room - under a sturdy table or desk or against an inside wall where nothing can fall on you.

·        Practice drop, cover, and hold on at least twice a year. Drop  under a sturdy desk or table, hold on, and protect the eyes by pressing the face against the arm. If there is  no table or desk nearby, sit on the floor against an interior wall away from windows or tall furniture that could fall on you.

·        Teach children to drop, cover, and hold on  

During an Earthquake

·        Stay calm.

·        Inside, stand in a doorway or crouch under a desk or table, away from windows. Watch for falling objects. If  in bed, hold on and stay there, protecting the head  with a pillow. Drop, cover, and hold on

·        Outdoors, stand away from buildings, trees, telephone, and  electrical lines.

·        On the road, drive away from subways, flyovers and bridges. Stop in safe area. Stay in vehicle.

After an Earthquake

·        Check for injuries. Provide first aid.

·        Check for water, sewage breaks and for downed electrical lines and short-circuits. Turn off appropriate utilities. Look for and extinguish small fires. Eliminate fire hazards.

·        Check for  building damage and potential safety problems.

·        Clean up dangerous spills.

·        Turn on radio and listen for instructions from local authorities/police/fire brigade

·        Don't use the telephone except for emergencies.

·        Expect aftershocks. Each time you feel one, drop, cover, and hold on

Floods and Flash Floods

[In addition to what has been listed under family preparedness as a generic response, floods demand specific preparedness and responses. Given below are the preparedness measures and responses which are  specific to floods].

Floods are the most common and widespread of all natural hazards.  Some floods develop over a period of days, but flash floods can result in raging waters in just a few minutes.  Flash floods carry rocks, mud and other debris and can occur without any visible sign of rainfall.  Land slides are another danger created by flooding.

Before a Flood

·        Find out if the area is flood-prone from the local authorities.

·        Understand the flood levels and learn about the history of flooding in the community.

·        Learn flood warning signs and community alert signals and know the terms used to describe flooding.

During a Flood Watch

·        Listen to a battery-operated radio for the latest flood information. Fill buckets and other water containers with clean water in case water becomes contaminated.

·        Be aware of flash floods. Flash floods will rise faster and  cut off the escape routes. If there is any possibility of a flash flood occurring, move immediately to higher ground.  Do not wait for instructions to move.

·        Move valuable household possessions to the upper floors or to safe ground if time permits.

During a Flood

If Indoors:

·        Turn on battery-operated radio or television to get the latest emergency information.

·        Get your preassembled emergency supplies.

·        If told to leave, do so immediately.

If Outdoors:

·        Climb to high ground and stay there. Avoid walking through any floodwaters. If it is moving swiftly, even shallow water can sweep you off your feet.

·        Do not allow children to play in flood waters

If In A vehicle:

·        If  travelling towards a flooded area, turn around and go another way.

·        If the vehicle stalls, abandon it immediately on the side of the road and climb to higher ground. Many deaths have resulted from attempts to move stalled vehicles.

·        If trapped in a vehicle that is going under water, get out of the submerged vehicle by opening a window or door and swimming to safety.

After a Flood

·        Flood dangers do not end when the water begins to recede. Listen to a radio or television and don't return home until authorities indicate it is safe to do so.

·        When entering buildings, use extreme caution.

·        Examine walls, floors, doors, and windows to make sure that the building is not in danger of collapsing.

·        Watch out for animals, especially poisonous snakes, that may have got into the house with the flood waters. Use a stick to poke through debris.

·        Watch for loose plaster and ceilings that could fall.

·        Throw away food that has come in contact with flood waters.

·        Remove water from the house to avoid structural damage.

Epidemics

[In addition to what has been listed under family preparedness as a generic response, epidemics  demand specific preparedness and responses. Given below are the preparedness measures and responses which are  specific to epidemics ].

Different epidemics will have different etymology and consequences. Water-borne, vector-borne or  viral epidemics will need different levels of preparedness and response. Some epidemics may have a quick onset whereas others may take a longer time to spread. The public health department is primarily concerned with issuing the epidemic warning and declaring the areas as epidemic prone.

After the warning

·        Understand the specific nature of the epidemic including the causation, nature of spread, symptoms  and medication

·        Understand the specific precautionary and preventive measures to be taken by the family members.

·        Ensure intake of safe water and food. Take extra measures to protect food stocks.

·        Receive all recommended vaccinations, inoculations and encourage the neighbours to help health authorities to prevent spread of epidemics

·        Avoid stockpiling preventive medicines at family level. This may create a severe shortage of essential drugs.

·        Take extra-care in disposal of family waste and also assist in community efforts in disposal of waste

·        Keep in constant touch with epidemic information and public health staff in the area

During the Epidemic

·        Report any symptoms to the health authorities immediately

·        Understand if there is a need for quarantine

·        Understand the nature of treatment and possible emergencies

·        Do not leave the epidemic area without a clearance from the health authorities

·        Report arrival of any guests from the epidemic area

·        Discourage relatives and friends from outside epidemic area to visit your areas

·        Understand the steps to be taken in the disposal of personnel belongings of the patient including disposal of excreta

·        Understand the procedure for disposal of the dead body of the epidemic victim

Road Accidents

[In addition to what has been listed under family preparedness as a generic response, road accidents  demand specific preparedness and responses. Given below are the preparedness measures and responses which are  specific to road accidents].

Road Accidents are a major killer and take place without any warning.  Accidents may involve passenger vehicles, goods vehicles, vehicles carrying hazardous and toxic materials. The damage therefore may involve injuries and deaths, chemical spills, fires or release of toxic gases.

On accident event (involving passenger vehicle)

Those at the accident site should follow the following priorities

·         Look for and rescue the injured or those trapped in the vehicles

·         Arrange for transport of the injured to the nearest medical care centre

·         Place the dead bodies on one side to avoid obstructions

·         Organise locally traffic control using the available manpower to avoid traffic jams

·         Discourage people from crowding near the accident spot

·         Discourage people from looting the goods from the accident vehicle

·         Arrange to inform the nearest traffic police post through passing vehicles on either side

On accident event (involving hazardous and toxic elements)

·        Do not go anywhere near the accident spot unless the hazardous and toxic elements are properly understood and  discourage others. The contents may explode or catch fire

·        Prevent people at the accident site from lighting of matches for cigarettes etc.

·        Discourage people from collecting the spills from the accident vehicle as the chemicals might be deceptive and lead to toxic exposure or explosions

·        Arrange to inform the nearest traffic police/fire brigade through passing vehicles

·        Identify the wind direction and move in the opposite direction

·        Do not allow any traffic congestion near the accident spot

·        Stop the traffic at a sufficient distance (at least half a kilometre) from the accident spot in all directions till the nature of chemicals is properly understood

Dissemination of DDMAP

In order for the DDMAP to be effective it would be disseminated at two levels ;

·         to the district authorities, government departments, NGOs and other  agencies and institutions within the district and

·         to general public.

Effective dissemination of plan requires a well designed and focused training  and awareness programmes. The responsibility for dissemination of the plan is  vested with the District Disaster Manager,  at the Collectorate, and training activities will be carried out under the guidance and direction of  YASHADA, as well as through awareness programmes organised by each of the agencies participating in disaster management such as Irrigation Department organising warning and evacuation exercises or Fire Brigade demonstrating rescue operations. The District Disaster Manager would also involve NGOs in preparing suitable public awareness material to be distributed to the public. The specific NGOs to be involved in these exercises are given below.

List of NGOs to be involved in Plan Dissemination

            Sr.No.              Name of NGO’s                     

            1.                     Gujrati Samaj Mandal, Chandrapur.

            2.                     Sanmitrta Mandal,Samadhi ward Chandrapur.                     

            3.                     Lok Seva & Vikas Sanstha, Near Sai Baba Mandir,  

                                    Chandrapur                            

            4.                     Jain Seva Mandal Kasturba Road, Chandrapur                                

            5.                     Vishwabharti Khadi Gramodaya Sanstha, Chandrapur                                

            6.                     Chandrapur Vyapari Mandal  

            7.                     Chandrapru Social Academy             

             8.                    Rotary Club Of Chandrapur   

            9.                     Rotary Club Of Chanda Fort              

             10.                  Lions Club Of Chandrapur                 

             11.                  Indian Medical Association     

                                    Chandrapur Branch               

            12.                   Maharogi Seva Samiti, Warora(Anandvan)

            13.                   Rotary Club Of Warora          

            14.                   Lokseva Mandal Bhadrawati  

            15.                   Jain Shwetamber Mandal, Bhadrawati                                  

            16.                   Veer Savarkar Mandal,Rammandir Ward,Warora.   

            17.                   Vyapari Sanghatna,Warora   

            18.                   Azad Hind Mandal,Warora     

            19.                   Nagvidharbha Charkha Sangh,Mul                            

            20.                   Gurudev Seva Mandal , Neri, Tah.Chimur                 

            21.                   Ballarpur Seva Samiti Ballarpur.

            22.                   Khristanand MisionaryBrahmapuri

            23.                   Surabhi, Nagbheer                 

            24.                   Lions Club,Sindewahi            

The training programmes will be organised for different levels of functionaries. The district level officials and identified NGOs, Private Sector organisations will receive the training at YASHADA under their Training of Trainers (TOT) programme in order to equip them to extend training facilities to functionaries at taluka and village level as well as organise simulation exercises within the community.  Some of the select government training institutions at the district level will participate in such TOTs and undertake training programmes for government functionaries. Efforts will be therefore directed to decentralise training activity to the extent possible so as to enable YASHADA to serve as resource centre and provide training expertise to various groups.

The materials for awareness programmes at community level would be prepared in the local language to ensure widespread dissemination. Media would be extensively used for public awareness programmes. These will include 

Þ     newspapers including local ones

Þ     TV

Þ     local cable networks

Þ     radio

Þ     folk media

Þ     publicity material

Schools, colleges and other public institutions would be specifically targetted.

In addition to dissemination of literature related to the DDMAP, disaster response drills should be conducted on a regular basis especially in the disaster prone areas to maintain the readiness of communities  and departments as regards  operational procedures, personnel and equipment and orderly response.

Local agencies such as fire, police and ambulance staff  would be familiar with the disasters possible in an area. Mutual aid organizations and public emergency response organizations would be included in these drills

The objectives of  full scale  drill include evaluation of  the following:

·         practicality of the plan (structure and organization)

·         adequacy of communications and interactions among agencies and the public

·         emergency equipment effectiveness

·         adequacy of first aid and rescue procedures

·         adequacy of emergency personnel response and training

·         public relations skills

·         evacuation and  count procedures

Plan Evaluation

The purpose of evaluation of  DDMAP is to determine

·         the adequacy of resources

·         coordination between various agencies

·         community participation

·         partnership with NGOs

The ease of understanding and using the plan will also be important considerations.

The plan will be updated when  shortcomings  are observed in

·         organizational structures

·         technological changes render information obsolete;

·         response mechanism following reports on drills or exercises;

·         assignments of state agencies.

Adaptation, improvisation and optimisation are corner stones of any planning pertaining to disasters. It must be emphasized that the Documents or Manuals prepared as  disaster management plan have a limited purpose. These can at best serve as reminder of tasks and activities.

Individuals and agencies assigned specific responsibilities within this Plan will prepare appropriate supporting plans and related standard operating procedures, periodically review and update alerting procedures and resource listings, and maintain an acceptable level of preparedness.

The DDMAP would be evaluated by both  the district and the state.

Post-Disaster Evaluation

A post-incident evaluation would be done after the withdrawal of relief and rehabilitation activities in order to assess

·         the nature of state intervention and support, 

·         suitability of the organization structure,

·         institutional arrangements,

·         adequacy of Operating Procedures,

·         monitoring mechanisms,

·         information tools,

·         equipment,

·         communication system, etc.,

The  impact studies on the above  operations for long-term preventive and mitigation efforts are also to be undertaken.

At the community level, evaluation exercises may be undertaken to assess the reactions of the community members at various stages in the disaster management cycle and to understand their perceptions about disaster response in terms of 

·         adequacy of training,

·         alert and warning systems,

·         control room functions,

·         communication plans,

·         security,

·         containment

·         recovery procedures,

·         monitoring

Plan Update

The DDMAP is a “living document” and the Collector  along with YASHADA will update it every year taking into consideration

·         the resource requirements,

·         updates on human resources

·         technology to be used

·         coordination issues

An annual conference for DMAP update will be organised by the Collector. All concerned  departments and agencies would participate and give recommendations on specific issues.

The following  guidelines would be adhered to while updating the DDMAP :

·         A procedure, would be in place to update the plan on a regular basis to ensure that  the items requiring updation are considered and are current.

·         When an amendment is made to a plan, the amendment date would be noted on the updated page of the plan.

·         A senior  official in every  agency  would be designated to ensure that all plan-holders are notified of changes as soon as possible.  Plan-holders would be requested to verify that they have received the changes.

Annexure I: Guidelines for Formation of MARG

In areas where there is a concentration of  hazardous industries,  Mutual Aid and Response Groups can be organised to make the industrial zone to be self-sufficient to a fairly large extent and manage industrial accidents, both on-site and off-site.

The pre-requisite for setting up such a group are

1.      General information on industries, settlements and geo-physical and climatic data

2.      Zoning of the Industrial area with listing of industries in each zone

3.      Identification of lead industry and the group leader and assistant group leaders with their names, addresses and telephones, who would act as liaison persons

4.      Identification of technical experts in each zone with their names and addresses who would respond to the call for assistance

5.      Identification of potential hazards/toxic materials with the list containing physical and hazardous properties, procedures for responding  spillage and leakage, cautions to be taken including emergency procedures, naturalisation procedures, protective equipments, emergency equipments, first-aid.

6.      List of hazardous chemicals and quantities stored by different industries

7.      Names, locations and telephone numbers of hospitals and poison centres

Guidelines For Seeking MARG Assistance

Preparation :

1.      All concerned industries should prepare an Onsite Emergency Control plan with following information.

·        Risk Analysis.

·        Safety and Environmental Audit

·        Worst case scenario.

·        List of inventories.

·        Hazard Identification

·        Material safety data sheets

·        Plant layout with escape routes

·        Demographic and geographic situation.

·        Location of Fire hydrants

·        Distances between the processes and facilities in plant and in immediate vicinity of plant be logged and determined in terms of time and distance.

·        Evacuation procedure

·        Emergency control organisation structure

·        Responsible personnel list with addresses and telephone numbers.

·        Available emergency control facilities.

2.      An effort has to be made to dovetail Onsite plan to Off-Site plan.

3.      Such plan should be available in the designated Emergency Control Centre of the factory, Directorate of Industrial  Safety and Health, Fire Brigade, Police, District/Corporation Officials and Collector and should be updated periodically.

4.      Training sessions and mock drills in First Aid, Fire Fighting, Evacuation,  First Responder.  Regular testing of plants processes should be conducted to appraise and train different levels of employees in emergency control.

During An Emergency :

1.      During an emergency, assistance should be sought from the immediate neighbouring MARG Member/s enlisted zonewise having appropriate expertise as per the guidelines and equipments, gadgets for controlling situation and Statutory Authorities simultaneously.

2.      All the personnel in each factory who are responders for emergency must be made aware about the availability of such MARG assistance and methods of getting it.

3.      Assisting organisation must be properly briefed by the unit seeking the assistance about the nature of emergency, materials involved and meteorology conditions (Wind direction), precise nature of help required to ensure proper response.

4.      Assistance can be requested in the form of either equipment or expertise or both with expert operating personnel.

5.      In case of equipment received from assisting organisation

·        It must be properly used

·        Returned promptly

·        In case of damage it should be repaired from approved agency and returned in working condition.

·        Consumables should be replaced/reimbursed.

6.      When a MARG member is extending help to Non-MARG member or other organisation make sure that

·        Appropriate equipment tested for the purpose is given.

·        If your personnel are attending the emergencies ensure that they are well-versed and have worked under such a situation and are able to give guidance.

·        The situation and the materials involved are being briefed to you correctly.

·        The guidance about plants, processes and materials involved is available on the spot from the organisation receiving the assistance

7.      It is understood that in case of any accident to any personnel while assisting, organisation that is receiving help extend its co-operation in bearing a reasonable part of expenses, beyond that covered by an insurance policy.

8.      Following sequence of action is recommended while seeking help

·        First Deploy internal resources.

·        Inform civic Fire Brigade and get their assistance.  Inform the Statutory Authorities, keep appropriate MARG member in your zone/neighbourhood alerted about the emergency.

·        If found necessary request help from the MARG member to control specific situation for which it has got equipment and expertise.

·        Convey clearly what you want, expertise, equipment or both and exact nature of need.

·        Keep other MARG member in your zone alerted to render any further assistance, if the situation so demands.

General :

·        Each organisation is primarily responsible for keeping its plants in safe conditions, identifying, assessing, minimising and eliminating hazards and risk, maintaining necessary equipment for special kinds of risks that the organisation might be facing and training its personnel for emergency response and control.

·        It may seek help from others in the MARG by way of equipment, expertise and special materials, but this is only complementary to its own arrangements and commitment to safety and emergency control.

·        Mutual Aid and Response is sought only when your own efforts seems to be inadequate to meet the demand of the situation and that of civic response group is either not adequate or enough.

FACILITIES, RESOURCES, AGENCIES WITH CONTACT ADDRESSES & TELEPHONE NUMBERS

Government Sector

Senior Government Officials in Mantralaya and Divisional  Headquarters, IMD, National Fire Service College, Air Force

SR

No

Facility/Resources

Location

Authority Incharge

Alternate Authority

1

Chief Secretary to Govt. of Maharashtra

Mantralaya, Mumbai

 P. Subrahmaniam Chief Secretary

2025042 (Office)

2023762(Resid.)

2028594 (Fax)

2

Principal Secretary Revenue & Forests Department Delhi for further evaluation

Mantralaya, Mumbai

Principal Secretary

Revenue  & Forests Deptt.

2836363 (Office)

2024588(Resid.)

2850191 (Fax)

3

Principal Secretary Relief & Rehabilitation Deptt.

Mantralaya, Mumbai

Principal Secretary

Relief & Rehabilitation Deptt.

2023039

4

Secretary (Earthquake Relief & Rehabilitation)

Mantralaya, Mumbai

Secretary Earthquake

Relief & Rehabilitation

2025274 (Office)

2855920(Fax)

525555(Direct)

5

Divisional Commissioner

Nagpur Division, Nagpur

Civil Lines, Nagpur

Divisional Commissioner

Nagpur Division, Nagpur

532123 (Office)

532132 (Office)

531756(Residence)

532043 (Fax)

Gp. Capt. S.M. Taxali

SLMO (MT)

526011

2272 (Extn.)

6

Heavy rainfall wrning for 24 and 48 housrs for Vidarbha is issued by Metrological Office during SW Mansoon Period. There is a seismograph installed

Metrological Office, Airport, Nagpur Ploat No. 31 Jaiprakash Nagar

Somalwada, Nagpur-25

Director , Metrological Office, Nagpur

222157

222157 (Fax)

P.A.

Seismological Observatory C/o Shri M.B. Sathe , Plot No. 31 Jaiprakash Nagar, Somalwada

Nagpur 25

Deputy Director

General of Metrology, Regional Metrological Centre, Nagpur

Phone223518

222157 (Fax)

7

National Fire Service College, Nagpur

Water traders - 4

Mini-water tender-1

Turn table ladder-2

Hydraulic lateform-3

Portable pumps-6

Trailior fire pums-3

Emergency tender-1

Ambulances-3

Palm  Road

Nagpur-1

Director 532075 Phone/Fax

Dy. Director

532074

532076

532079

8

HQ MC (U)

AIR FORCE,

VAYU SENA NAGAR,

NAGPUR

VAYU SENA NAGAR

NAGPUR

Air Marshal

AO     N-C HQ MC, IAF

526011 Extn. 2250

525555 (Direct)

Wg Cdr

Commanding Officer

526011 Extn. 2351

Manpower - 1352

Vaya Sena Naar Nagpur

Air officer Lge & Maint

526011, Extn 2261

526666 (Direct)

Gp.Capt

SLMO (MT)

526011 Extn. 2272

Vechicles – 39

Vayu Sena Nagar Nagpur

Senior Air & Admn.Staff Officer

526011, Extn.2211

527879 (Direct)

Gp Capt.

Air_I

526011 (Extn. 2246)

Aircrafts (AVRO)


Collector Office, Chandrapur

Facility/Resources

Location

Authority Incharge

Alternate Authority

Manpower

Class-I

Class-II

Class-III

Class-IV

=23

=--

=73

=31

Chandrapur

Collector

Collector's Office, Chandrapur

(07172)- 55300 (O)

55200 ®

55500 (Fax)

Addt.Collector

07172-56101 (Office)

56050®

Cars

Jeeps

Godowns

(2000 MT Capacity)

=2

=6

=3

Resident Dy.Collector

Collecotor's Office Chandrapur

07172-55400 (Office)

55291 ®

55400

Manpower

Jeeps

Godowns (1000 MT)

=53

=2

=2

Warora

SDO Warora

0716-82016

0716-82092

Tahsildar

Tahsil office Warora

07176-82110

Manpower

Jeep

Godown (1000 MT)

=41

=1

=2

Bhadrawati

Tahsildar

Tahsil Office Bhadrawati

07175-65080

07175-65080 (Fax)

Naib Tahsildar Bhadrawati

Manpower

Jeep

Godown (1280 MT)

=41

=1

=3

Chimur

Tahsildar

Tahsil Office Chimur

(07170) 65547

Resident Naib Tahsildar

Chimur

SR

No

Facility/Resources

Location

Authority Incharge

Alternate Authority

Manpower

Jeep

Godown ( 1400 MT)

=41

=1

=2

Mul

Tahsildar

Tahsil Office Mul

07178-62310

Resident Naib Tahsildar

Mul

Manpower

Jeep

Godown ( 1000 MT)

=19

=1

=3

Sawali

Tahsildar

Tahsildar Office Sawali

07178-74412

Resident Naib Tahsildar

Sawali

Manpower

Jeep

Godown ( 600 MT)

=41

=1

=2

Gondpipri

Tahsildar

Tahsildar Office Gondprpri

07173-56240

Resident Naib Tahsildar

Manpower

Jeep

Godown (2000 MT)

=53

=2

=3

Chandrapur

SDO Chandrapur

07172-51401,

55298®

Tahsildar

07172s-20206

Manpower

Jeep

Godown ( 1500 MT )

=58

=2

=3

Rajura

SDO Rajura

07173-52123

Tahsildar Rajura

07173-52131

Manpower

Jeep

Godown ( 1200 MT)

=19

=1

=3

Korpana

Tahsildar

07173-6658

Naib Tahsildar Korpana

Manpower

Jeep

Godown ( 2000 MT )

=53

=2

=4

Bramhapuri

SDO Bramhapuri

07177

Tahsildar, Bramhapuri

07177-72073

Manpower

Jeep

Godown ( 2000 MT )

=41

=1

=3

Nagbhid

Tahsildar

07177-6650

Resident Naib Tahsildar

Manpower

Jeep

Godown ( 1000 MT)

=41

=1

=1

Sindhewai

Tahsildar

6845(Office)

6846®

Resident Naib Tahsildar


Superitendent of Police

Facility/Resources

Location

Authority Incharge

Alternate Authority

Vechicle Foure Wheeler

Two Wheller

Boat

Fiber

Rubber

Fire Equipments

Wireless Sets & Generator

Hospital

Rope & Torches

=64

=2

=1

=1

=5

=92

=1

Chandrapur M.T. Section Police Hqr.

Police Hqr. Chandrapur

Supdt. of Police

55100

07172 ( Fax)

Police Inspector

M.T. Section

Reserve Police Inspector

Ph.No. 50241

Wireless Police Inspector

Reserve Police Inspector

Zilla Parishad

Facility/Resources

Location

Authority Incharge

Alternate Authority

Car

Jeep

Godown

Power Pump Unit

=8

=10

=5

=2

Chandrapur

Chief Executive Officer

Zilla  Parishad, Chandrapur

56401

55868 Fax

Dy.C.E.O. (Gen.) Z.P. Chandrapur

Ph.No. 55592

Jeep

Godown

Tanker

Roller

=3

=2

=1

=1

Chandrapur

Block Development Officer

Panchyat Samiti, Chandrapur

Ph.No. 50231

S.O.

P.S. Chandrapur

Ph.No. 50231

Jeep

Godown

Truck

Tanker

Roller

=3

=1

=1

=1

=1

Gondpipri

Block Development Officer

Ph.No. 56224

Supdt. P.S. Gondpipri

Ph.No. 56224

Jeep

Godown

Truck

Tipper

Roller

=4

=2

=2

=1

=3

Rajura

Block Development Officer

Ph.No. 52124

S.O. P.S. Rajura

Ph.No.52124

----

Korpana

Block Development Officer

---

Jeep

Godown

Roller

=3

=1

=1

Bhadrawati

Block Development Officer

P.S. Bhadrwati

Ph.No.66031

S.O.P.S. Bhadrawati

Ph.No. 66031

Jeep

Godown

Truck

Tanker

Roler

=3

=2

=1

=1

=3

Warora

Block Development Offier

P.S. Warora

Ph.No.82052

S.O.P.S. Warora

Ph.No. 82052

Jeep

Godown

Truck

Tanker

Roler

=4

=2

=3

=1

=3

Chimur

Block Development Officer

P.S. Chimur

Ph.No.65535

S.O.P.S. Chimur

Ph.No. 65535

Jeep

Godown

Truck

Tanker

Roler

=3

=2

=1

=1

=2

Bramhapuri

Block Development Officer

P.S. Bramhapuri

Ph.No.72038

S.O.P.S. Nagrale

Ph.No. 72038

Jeep

Godown

Truck

Tanker

Roler

=2

=1

=1

=1

=2

Nagbhid

Block Development Officer

P.S.Nagbhid

Ph.No.6629

S.O.P.S. Nagbhid

Ph.No. 6629

Jeep

Godown

Tipper

=2

=1

=1

Sindewahi

Block Development Officer

P.S. Sindewahi

Ph.No.8824

S.O.P.S. Sindewahi

Ph.No. 8824

Jeep

Godown

Truck

Tipper

Roler

=3

=2

=1

=1

=4

Mul

Block Development Officer

P.S. Mul

Ph.No.62208

S.O.P.S. Mul

Ph.No. 62208

----

Saoli

Block Development Offcier

P.S.Saoli

Ph.No.

---

Home Guards

Facility/Resources

Location

Authority Incharge

Alternate Authority

Jeep

Homeguards

=1

=80

Chandrapur

District Commandant Homeguards

Jatpura Ward No.2

Chandrapur

Ph.No. 56051 (O)

            50451 ®

Officer Commanding

Ph.No.56051

Homeguards

=75

Rajura

Officer Commanding

Ph.No.52215

Officer Commanding

Homeguards

=55

Bramhapuri

Officer Commanding

Ph.No.72625

Shri Lokhande

Homeguards

=40

Warora

Officer Commanding

Ph.No. 82221

---

Homeguards

=50

Gondpipri

Officer Incharge

Ph.No.

Shri Zade

Homeguards

=50

Ballarsha

Officer Incharge

Ph.No.40578

Shri Yerkar

Homeguards

=50

Mul

Officer Incharge

Ph.No.

Shri Dharne

Homeguards

=55

Sindewahi

Officer Incharge

Ph.No.

Shri Chate

Homeguards

=50

Nagbhid

Officer Incharge

Ph.No.6750

Shri Kadu

Homeguards

=40

Bhadrawati

Officer Incharge

Ph.No.

Shri Godhankar

Homeguards

=55

Chimur

Officer Incharge

Ph.No.65768

Shri Nagdeote

Total

=660

Fire Services in the district

Facility/Resources

Location

Authority Incharge

Alternate Authority

Fire Station

( Fire Brigade)

Chandrapur

Chief Officer Municipal Council

Chandrapur

Ph.No.55650

           55221

Shri Nanore

Fire Officer

Ph.No. 52800

--"--

Ballarpur

Chief Officer Municipal Council

Ballarpur

Ph.No.40343

40743 ®

Fire Officer

Fire Station Ballarpur

Ph.No.40390

--"--

Rajura

Chief Officer Municipal Council Rajura

---

--"--

Mul

Chief Officer Municipal Council Mul

Ph.No.62356 (O)

62357 ®

--"--

Bhadrawati

Dy. General Manager (Fire)

Ordance Factori

Bhadrawati

Ph.No.66577

Fire Officer

Ordance Factory

Bhadrawati

Ph.No. 66577

Central Water Commission

Facility/Resources

Location

Authority Incharge

Alternate Authority

Jeep

25" Steeel Boat

Fiber Boat

15" Teakwood Boat

HPOB Engine

Iron Boat

Engine

Wireless Sets

=1

=2

=1

=1

=2

=1

=2

=2

Chandrapur

Ghugus, Bamni

Ghugus

Bamni

Bamni

Bamni

Ghugus

Shri K.V. Sudhakar

Asstt. Engg.

Wadha Sub.Dn.C.W.C.

Near Jyoti Church

Tukum, Chandrapur

Shri T.V.K. Rao Junior Engg.

C.W.C. Ghugus

Shri M.A. Karim

J. Engg.

C.W.C. Chandrapur

Ph.No. 50845

Public Works Department

Facility/Resources

Location

Authority Incharge

Alternate Authority

Car

Jeep

Trucks

Tippers

Tankers

=3

=23

=29

=4

=6

Chandrapur and HQrs of Sub-Divisional Engineer

Chandrapur

Superintending Engineer,

Public Works Circle,

Chandrapur

Tel.No. 55449/53231

Fax No. 55449

Executive Engineer

P.W.Division No.Ichandrapur

Tel.No. 50245

Asstt. Superintending Engineer

Public Works Circle, Chandrapur

Tel.No. 55449/53231

Fax No. 55449

Deputy Executive Engineer

P.W.Division No.I Chandrapur

Tel.No. 50245

Chandrapur

Deputy Engineer,

P.W. Sub Dn.I.Chandrapur

Ph.No. 52557

Warora

Deputy Engineer,

P.W. Sub Dn Warora

Ph.No. 82163

Rajura

Deputy Engineer,

P.W.  (Civil ) Sub Dn. Rajura

Ph.No. 52159

Gadchandur

Deputy Engineer,

P.W. Sub Dn Gadchandur

Ph.No. 46621

Bhadrawati

Deputy Engineer,

P.W. Sub Dn Bhadrawati

Ph.No.

Chandrapur

Deputy Engineer,

Executive Engineer

P.W.  Division No.II Chandrapur

Ph.No. 52256

Deputy Executive Engineer

P.W. Division No. II, Chandrapur

Ph.No.  52256

Chandrapur

Deputy Engineer,

P.W. Sub Dn. Chandrapur

Ph.No. 52557

Junior Engineer

P.W. Sub Division No. I

Chandrapur

Ph.No. 52557

Chandrapur

Deputy Engineer,

Spl. Project

 Sub Dn.Chandrapur

Ph.No.

Junior Engineer

P.W. Sub Division No. I

Chandrapur

Ph.No. 52557

Gondpipri

Deputy Engineer,

P.W. Sub Dn. Gondpipri

Ph.No. 56249

Junior Engineer

P.W. Sub Division No. I

Chandrapur

Ph.No. 52557

Mul

Deputy Engineer,

P.W. Sub Dn Mul

Ph.No. 62218

Junior Engineer

P.W. Sub Division No. I

Chandrapur

Ph.No. 52557

Sindewahi

Deputy Engineer,

P.W. Sub Dn Sindewahi

Ph.No. 8835

Junior Engineer

P.W. Sub Division No. I

Chandrapur

Ph.No. 52557

Chandrapur

Deputy Engineer,

Mech P.W. Sub Dn Chandrapur

Ph.No.

Junior Engineer

P.W. Sub Division No. I

Chandrapur

Ph.No. 52557

Chandrapur

Executive Engineer,

E.G.S. (P.W.)  Division Chandrapur

Ph.No. 55449

Chimur

Deputy Engineer

P.W. Sub. Dn. Chimur

Ph.No. 65549

Bramhapuri

Deputy Engineer

P.W. Sub. Dn. Bramhapuri

Ph.No. 72078

Brahmapuri

Deputy Engineer

P.W. Sub. Dn. Bramhpuri

Ph.No. 72078

Nagbhid

Deputy Engineer

P.W. Sub. Dn. Nagbhid

Ph.No. 6633

Chandrapur

Executive Engineer

P.W. Sub. Dn. Chandrapur

Ph.No. 50637

Chandrapur

Deputy Engineer

P.W. Sub. Dn. I Chandrapur

Ph.No. 50637

Chandrapur

Deputy Engineer

P.W. Sub. Dn. II Chandrapur

Ph.No.  50637

Chandrapur

Deputy Engineer

P.W. Sub. Dn.III.

Chandrapur

Ph.No. 50637


Ordnance Factory

Facility/Resources

Location

Authority Incharge

Alternate Authority

Bhadrawati

General Manager

Ordance Factory Chanda

Ph.No. 74040

65040

74024   Fax 74051

65024          74052

Addl. General Manager

Ordance Factry, Chnada

Ph.No.  74010

 74014 ®

Telecom Department

Facility/Resources

Location

Authority Incharge

Alternate Authority

Telecom Department

Car

Neaar Collector

Benglow, Civil lines

Chandrapur

Shri N.S. Gupte

Telecom District

Manager Chandrapur

Ph.No. 56300 (O) fax 56644

            50800  ®

Shri K.L. Bomnote,

Divisional Engineer Telecom,

Chandrapur

Ph.No. 54900

   53542 ® s

Jeep

--"--

Shri K.L. Bomnote, Divisional Engineer, Telecom Chandrapur

Ph.No. 54900

54300 ®

Shri H.T. Tiple, S.D.E. (PLG) O/o  T.D.M. Chandrapur

Ph.No. 53377

54700 ®

Near Railway Station Chandrapur

Shri N.L. Pandaya,

Sub-Divisional Engineer, Cross-Bar Exchange

( MTCE) Chandrapur  Ph.No. 51000

54433 ®

Shri S.N. Gajbhe, S.D.E. (D-Tax) Cross-Bar Exchange Chandrapur

Ph.No. 51222

53402 ®

Near Zilla Parishad

Bapat Building

Chandrapur

Shri S.P. Lokhande, S.D.E.

O/o S.D.O.T. (M.M.)

Chandrapur

Ph.No. 33700

Shri Udit Shrivastava, S.D.O.T. Chandrapur

Ph.No. 52700

53100 ®

--"--

Shri A.R. Chaware, S.D.E.

O/o S.D.O.T. (M.M.)

Chandrapur

Ph.No. 33700

Shri M.H. Raut, S.D.E.

(Comm I) O/o T.D.M. Chandrapur

Ph.No. 24201

Ballarpur

Shri S.A. Dhote, S.D.E.

 S.D.E Telecom

Ballarpur

Ph.No. 40222

40000 ® 

Shri B.S. Jivene, Tech Ballarpur

Ph.No. 40222

Jeep

Brahmapuri

Shri G.P. Pandey, S.D.E. Telecom

Brhmapuri

Ph.No. 72100

72400

Shri A.M. Zade, J.T.O.

Sindewahi

Ph.No. 8899

8699 ®

Jeep

Rajura

Shri S.P. Lokahande S.D.E.

Telecom Rajura

Ph.No. 52300

Shri F.H. Kasare, J.T.O. Rajura Ph.No. 52000

52299 ®

Jeep

Warora

Shri A.S. Khare, S.D.E. Telecom

Warora

Ph.No. 82111

82555 ®

Shri S.K. Sonekar, J.T.O. Warora

Ph.No. 82060

82098 ®

Matador

Chandrapur

Shri A.D. PETKAR, S.D.E.

(Marr.) C/0 Cross-Bar Exchange Chandrapur

Ph.No. 54606

24406

Shri S.Y. Sadmek J.T.O.

Cross-Bar Exchange Chandrapur

Ph.No. 50300

22401 ®

Maharashtra State Electricity Board

Facility/Resources

Location

Authority Incharge

Alternate Authority

Power Generation (1840

Megawatts)

Urjanagar

P.O. Durgapur

Chandrapur 442404

Chief Engineer ( Gen. O & M )

Chandrapur Super Thermal Power Station M.S.E.B., Urja-Bhavan

Chandrapur442404

Ph.No. 52393 (O)

            51801 ®

Shri M.S. Choudhari

Dy.  Chief Engineer ( Gen O & M )

Stage I & II, CSTPS, MSEB

Urja-Bhavan,P.O. Durgapur

Chandrapur 442402

Ph.No. 54504 (O)

            51802 ®

Power Supply ( O&M)

Trucks

Jeeps

Car

School Bus

=17

=8

=1

=1

Chandrapur

Supdt. Engineer ( O & M)

Vidhut-Bhavan Babupath Chandrapur

Phone No. 51298

56316

56031 ®

Chandrapur

Executive Engg. ( O & M) MSEB

Chandrapur

Ph.No. 55542

52463

Warora

Executive Engg. MSEB

Divn No. II Warora

Ph.No.

Irrigation Department

Facility / Resource

Qty.

Location

Authority Incharge

Boats

3

Asolamendha Tank

Shri P.A. Zalke

Executive Engineer

Chandrapur Irrigation Division

Chandrapur 442401

Ph.No.32898 Code 07172

Ghodazari

Amalnalla

Wireless station

17

Chandrapur

Shri P.A. Zalke

Executive Engineer

Chandrapur Irrigation Division

Chandrapur 442401

Ph.No.32898 Code 07172

Gadchandur

Ghodajhari

Sindewahi

Govindpur

Navargaon

Nagbhid

Mendki

Chandai

Chargaon

Warora

Labhansarad

Asolamenda

Pathri

Saoli

Bembad

Kapasi

Water Supply Department

Facility / Resource

Location

Authority Incharge

Alternate Authority

--

Chandrapur

Shri J.K. Deshpande Supdt. Engineer Maharashtra Jeevan Authority, Env.Engg. Circle Chandrapur

Shri P.M. Ingle p.a. To Supdt. Engg. (Dy.Engg.) Maharashtra Jeevan Authority Env.Engg.Circle Chandrapur.

---

Chandrapur

Shri .V. Gujalwar Executive Engg. Maharashtra Jeevan Authority Env.Engg. Sub. Division Chandrapur Ph.No. 50597

50572

Shri R.S. Dethe, P.A. to Ex. Engg.

Ph.No. 50597 (Dy.Engg.)

50572

Jeep

Warora

Shri A.A. Ate, Sub Divisional Engg. Env. Engg. Division Warora

Ph.No. 82570

Asst. Engg. Sectional Engg. Ph.No. 82570

Jeep

Chandrapur

Shri M.N. Brahme Dy.Engg. (Mech.) Env. Engg. Division Chandrapur Ph.No. 50597

Sectional Engg. Junior Engineer

Ph.No. 50597

Jeep

Chandrapur

Shri M.K. Chandragade, Sub Divisional Officer. Env. Engg. Sub Division No-1 Chandrapur Ph.No. 52387

Asstt. Engg. Sectional Engg.

Jeep

Chandrapur

Shri P.P. Thakery Sub Divisional Offi. Env. Engg. Sub Division-2 Chandrapur

Asstt. Engineer

Jeep

Chandrapur

Shri M.H.J. Gawada, Sub Divn. Officer Env. Engg. Sub.Divn-3 Chandrapur

Ph.No. 50910

Asstt. Engg.

Jeep

Bramhapuri

Shri A.V. Alshi, Sub Divn. Officer

Env. Engg. Sub.Divn. Bramhapuri Ph.No. 72031

Asstt. Engineer

Jeep

Rajura

V.B. Jagtare,  Sud Divn. Officer Env. Engg. Sub Divn. Rajura Ph.No. 52143

Asstt. Engg.

Information & Publicity

Facility / Resource

Qty

Location

Authority Incharge

Alternate Authority

Teleprinter

1

Chandrapur

Shri S.P. Wandile

District Information Officer

Main Road Chandrapur

Ph.No. 52515

56592

Information Asstt.

Fax

1

Jeep

1

Radio Station

1

Chandrapur

Shri B.K. Pimpalgarhe Asstt. Station Director Radio Chandrapur

Ph.No. 55816

54634

T.V. Relay Centre

1

Chandrapur

Shri V.N. Page

Asstt. Engineer T.V. Realy Centre Chandrapur Ph.No. 52147

G.S.D.,A. Chandrapur

Facility / Resource

Qty

Location

Authority Incharge

Alternate Authority

Jeep

Rix Machine

1

2

Chandrapur

Shri Ashakant Ramteke, Senior Geologist, Ground Servey & Deelopment Agency, Chandrapur Ph.No. 50715

Shri. Bhatt. Asstt. Geologist, G.S.D.A. Chandrapur Ph.No. 50715

 

Regional Transport Office, Chandrapur

Facility / Resource

Qty

Location

Authority Incharge

Alternate Authority

Car

1

Chandrapur

Shri Uday S. Alsi

Dy. Regional Transport Officer Chandrapur Ph.No. 55372

Shri P.K. Tadvi

Asstt. R.T.O. Chandrapur Ph.No. 55372

 

Soil Conservation Department

Vehicle

Location

Authority

Alternate Authority

Mh 2/0675

Chandrapur Ditt.

Shri P.N. Bhoyar, Divisional Soil Conservation Officer Chandrapur

Tel.No. 53691

Shri B.R. Rajurkar Acctt. Officer DISCO Chandrapur

Ph.No. 53691

MZV/ 1430

Chandrapur, Mul & Saoli Taluka

Shri T.C. Bansod I/C Sub

Division  Soil Conservation Officer Chandrapur II

Ph.No. 50823

Shri T.C. Bansod Agril Office SDSCO Chandrapur II

MZV/9216

Chandrapur, Warora, Bhadrawati, Rajura Taluka

Shri N.L. Vidhate, Sub Divisional Soil Conservation Officer

Chandrapur Ph.No. 51417

Shri A.B. Gundawar, Agrit Officer SDSCO (LDNon Cada) Chandrapur

Ph.No. 51417

MZV/ 9214

Bramhapuri, Nagbhid Sindewahi Taluka

Shri R.S. Patiye, Sub Divisional Soil Conservation Officer Bramhapuri Ph.No. 72165

Shri S.R. Nagmoti Agrit Officer

 SDSCO Bramhapuri Tel. No. 72165

Warora Bhadrawati Talukas

Shri R.U. Samrit, Sub Divisional Soil Conservational Officer Warora Ph.No. 73082

Shri P.M. Chandroyan Agrit Officer SDSCO Warora

Tel No. 73082

MHV / 3068

Chimur Taluka

Shri V.S. Shende, Sub Divisional Soil Conservational Officer Chimur

Shri V.B. Dakhole, Agrit Officer ADSCO Chimur

MZV/9538

Rajura, Korpana

Taluka

Shri B.N. Aglawe, Sub Divisional Soil Conservation Officer Rajura Ph.No. 52171

Shri V.J. Kallurwar, Agrit Officer SDSCO Rajura

Ph.No. 52171

HHN/ 3244

Gondpipri TAluka

Shri N.G. Kale, Sub Divisional Soil Conservational Officer Gondpipri

Shri V.T. Ronge, Agrit Officer SDSCO Gondpipri

Other District Control Rooms in the Vidarbha Region

Location

Authority Incharge

Nagpur

Collectorate

Shri P.M. Bramhankar

Resident Dy. Collector Nagpur Ph.No. 531976 (O) 222305 ®

Wardha

Collectorate

Shri Deshpande

Resident Dy. Collector Wardha Ph.No. 07152-40372 (O) 40370 (R)

Chandrapur

Collectorate

Resident Dy.Collector

Chandrapur Ph.No.07172-55400 (O) 55292 ®

Bhandra

Collectorate

Resident Dy.Collector

Bhandara Ph.No.07134-52346 (O) 52244 ®

Gadchiroli

Collectorate

Resident Dy.Collector

Gadchiroli Ph.No. 07132-22322 (O) 22313 ®

Amravati

Collectorate

Resident Dy.Collector

Amravati Ph.No. 0721-662493 (O) 74066 ®

Akola

Collectorate

Resident Dy.Collector

Akola Ph.No. 25193 (O) 25045 ®

Buldhana

Collectorate

Resident Dy.Collector

Buldhana Ph.No. 07262-42411 (O) 42345 ®

Yavatmal

Collectorate

Resident Dy.Collector

Yavatmal Ph.No.07232-42400 (O) 44250 ®

Health Department

Facility/Resources

Location

Authority Incharge

Alternate Authority

Doctors

Nurses

Other Staff

Hospitals :-

District Hospitals

Rural Hospital

Beds

District Hosopital

Rural Hospital

Ambulance

Surgical

Facilities

Blood Bank

Trauma Care Centre

X-ray machines

Poison Treatment Centre

Patholocial lab

=28

=65

=268

=1

=10

=

=

=250

=300

=

=

=

=1

=11

=11

=11

Chandrapur

Dr. M.D. Solunke Civil Surgeon

District Hospital, Chandrapur

Tel.No. 07172-52103 (O)

50301 ®

Dr. A.V. Dasarwar Rural Medical Officer, Tel. No. 54853

2. Dr. V.H. Dhankar R.M.O. (OUT REACH) Govt. Hospital Chandrapur Ph.No. 50368

Jeep

Ambulance

Pathological lab

Poison Treatment Centre

Trauma Care Centre

=1

=1

=1

=1

=1

Mul

Dr. P.N. Sonune

Medical Supritendunt

Rural Hospital Mul

Ph.No.

Medical Officer

Rural Hospital Mul

Jeep

Amublance

Pathological lab

Poison Treatment Centre

Trauma care Centre

=1

=1

=1

=1

=1

Sindewahi

Dr. P.N. Badnore

Medical Supritendunt

Rural Hospital Sindewahi

Tel No.

Medical Officer

Rural Hospital Sindewahi

Jeep

Ambulance

Pathological Lab

Poison Treatment Centre

Trauma Care Centre

=1

=1

=1

=1

=1

Nagbhid

Rural Hospital  Nagbhid

Ph.No.

Medical Officer

Rural Hospital Nagbhid

 

Jeep

Ambulance

Pathological Lab

Poison Treatment Centre

Trauma Care Centre

=1

=1

=1

=1

=1

Bramhpuri

Medical Supritendunt

Rural Hospital Bramhapuri

Ph.No. 22102

Dr. D.A. Andelkar

Medical Officer

Ph.No. 22102

 

Jeep

Ambulance

Pathological Lab

Poison Treatment Centre

Trauma Care Centre

=1

=1

=1

=1

=1

Rajura

Medical Supritendunt

Rural Hospital Rajura

Ph.No.

Medical Officer

Rural Hospital Rajura

 

Jeep

Ambulance

Pathological Lab

Poison Treatment Centre

Trauma Care Centre

=1

=1

=1

=1

=1

Gondpipri

Medical Supritendunt

Rural Hospital Gondpipri

Ph.No.

M.O. R.H. Gondpipri

 

Jeep

Ambulance

Pathological Lab

Poison Treatment Centre

Trauma Care Centre

=1

=1

=1

=1

=1

Bhadrawati

Medical Supritendunt

R.H. Bhadrawati

Ph.No. 66018

Exlension Officer Health Ph.No. 66031

 

Jeep

Ambulance

Pathological Lab

Poison Treatment Centre

Trauma Care Centre

=1

=1

=1

=1

=1

Warora

Medical Supritendunt

R.H. Warora

Medical Officer

 

Jeep

Ambulance

Pathological Lab

Poison Treatment Centre

Trauma Care Centre

Doctors

Nurses

Pharmalist

=1

=1

=1

=1

=1

=2

=3

=1

Chimur

Gadchandur

Tq. Korpana

Dr. T.G. Dhole

Medical Supritendunt

R.H. Chimur

Ph. No.

Medical Supritendunt

R.H. Gadchandur

Ph.no.

 

Doctors

Nurses

Four Wheeler

Pharmalist

Other Staff

P H Cs

Allopathic Dispensory

Ayurvedic Dispensory

Pathological Labs

Poison Treatment Centre

Water Quality testing Centre

=103

=450

=37

=54

=184

=59

=9

=10

=9

=59

=3

In Chandrapur

District

Dr. P.R. Kulkarni

District Health Officer

Zilla Parishad

Chandrapur

Ph. No. 53275 (O)

             52281 ®

 


Health Centres in Chandrapur District

Bhadrawati Taluka

Bhadrawat

Chandankheda

Ghodpeth

Majari

Mudholi

Tq. Bramhapyri

Ahernawargaon

Bramhapuri

Gangalwadi

Mendki

Mudza

Dr. Vaidya, M.S./R.H. 66018

Dr. Belekar M.O.

Dr. P.M.Nagrale , M.O.

Dr. P.J. Thengne, M.O.

Dr. P.S. Chatur, M.O.

Dr. M.S. Kayarkar M.O.

Dr. S.J. Pimpalkhute, M.O. 22102

Dr. M.K. Khotade, M.O.

Dr. S.V. Bijamwar

Dr. M.M. Borkar

Shri V.S. Bhoyar, E.O.H. 66031

Shri Meshram H.A.

Dr. Ku. S.S. Ayyar, M.O.

Shri Sayyad, H.A.

Shri R.G. Mande, H.A.

Shri Akojwar, H.A.

Dr. D.A. Andelkar, M.O.

Dr. Ku. Moon, M.O.

Shri Yengalwar, H.A.

Shri Dhone H.A.

Chandrapur  Taluka

Ballarpur

Chichpalli

Durgapur

Ghugus

Kothari

Tadali

Visapur

Chimur Taluka

Bhisshi

Jambhulghat

Khadsangi

Masal

Neri

Shankarpur

Gondpipri taluka

Dhaba

N.More

Pombhurna

Mul Taluka

Bembal

Chiroli

Mul

Rajoli

Dr. G.G. Kuril, M.O.

Dr. A.P. Wawarkar, M.O.

Dr. V.N. Badwaik, M.O.

Dr. M.H. Karmarkar, M.O.

Dr. V.M. Tyagi, M.O.

Dr. A. Chitaki, M.O.

Dr. S.P. Ghodmare, M.O.

Dr. P.L. Shivarkar, M.O.

Dr. T.D. Golghate, M.O.

Dr. V.V. Pidurkar, M.O.

Dr. B.N. Satyadeo, M.O.

Dr. A.K. Barapatre, M.O.

Dr. S.A. Diware, M.O.

Dr. P.S. Khobragade, M.O.

Dr. R.K. Barde

Dr. A. Khandekar, M.O.

Dr. P.S. Amatkat, M.O.

Dr. R.N. Warjurkar, M.O.

Dr. S.S. Zurmure, M.O.

Dr. J.N. Lodhe, M.O. 

Dr. V.D. Nilawar, M.O.

Shri Sonule, H.A.

Dr. S. Deshmukh, M.O.

Shri M.J. Wararkar, H.A.

Shri P.S. Shende, H.A.

Dr. Ku. V. Lale, M.O.

Shri V.M. Bhoyar, H.A.

Shri Bhonbe, H.A.

Shri H.M. Raut, H.A.

Shri Madhavi, H.A.

Shri Lakhe, H.A.

Shri B.V. Andraskar, H.A.

Shri N.M. Aswale

Dr. Fulzale, M.O.

Shri Potduke, H.A.

Shri Kasiwar, H.A.

Shri S.A. Madhurwar, H.A.

Shri A.L. Deshkar, H.A.

Shri S.M. Sadamwar, H.A.

Shri P.A. Teppalwar, H.A.

Nagbhir Taluka

Balapur

Moushi

Nagbhir

Talodhi

Wadhona

Dr. N.R. Adkine, M.O.

Dr. R.S. Naringe, M.O.

Dr. L.L. Bajaj, M.O.

Dr. Madehswar, M.O.

Dr. C.D. Lade M.O.

Shri Kalam, H.A.

Shri Kohad, H.A.

ShriChamroliya, E.O.H.P.S.

Shri A.S. Duryodhan, H.A.

Shri Ku. M. Agarkar, M.O.

Rajura Taluka

Chindholi

Dewada

Dr. A.N. Bhagwat, M.O.

Dr. A.B. Wankar, M.O.

Shri Kumbhare, H.A.

Dr. Ku. M. Madhavi, A.M.O.

Korpana Taluka

Gadchandur

Jioti

Kadholi

Mandwa

Patan

Virurgadegaon

Dr. M.V. Sute, M.O.

Dr. A.C. Loya, M.O.

Dr. R.S. Ambule, M.O.

Dr. S. Pathak, M.O.

Dr. S.G. Gawande, M.O.

Dr. P.S. Khekade, M.O.

Dr. Ku. G. Shende, A.M.O.

Dr. Charpe, A.M.O.

Dr. Ku. S. Rangari, A.M.O.

Dr. V.V. Randive, A.M.O.

Dr. K.A. Shende, A.M.O.

Dr. Rayapure, A.M.O.

Saoli Taluka

Antargaon

Bothali

Londholi

Pathari

Saoli

Vyad

Dr. P.S. Mahajan, M.O.

Dr. A.R. Lakaswar, M.O.

Dr. S.Y. Pullakwar, M.O.

Dr. M.V. Todsam, M.O.

Dr. S.M. Kumbhare, M.O.

Dr. S.K. Meshram, M.O.

Shri Kanampalliwar, H.A.

Dr. Ku. K. Wadhekar, M.O.

Shri A.S. Khobragade, H.A.

Dr. Ku. Shastri, M.O.

Shri Sonone, H.A.

Shri Madhavi, H.A.

Sindewahi Taluka

Gunjewai

Mohadi N.

Navargaon

Sindewahi

Dr. S.N. Konbotulwar, M.O.

Dr. V.V. Guru, M.O.

Dr. S.V. Belorkar, M.O.

Dr. A.S. Gajbhiye, M.O.

Shri P.Z. Bokade, H.A.

Shri Lohakare, H.A.,

Shri Nandanwar, H.A,

Dr. Ku. A. Ugalmungale, M.O.

Warora

Kosarsar

Madheli

Nagri

Saori

Dr. G.B. Bhoyar, M.O.

Dr. S.S. Mudewar, M.O.

Dr. P.T. Panchbhai, M.O.

Dr. U.P. Patil, M.O.

Shri Todase, H.A.

Shri Bhogekar, H.A.

Shri Dhurve, H.A.

Shri Waikar, H.A.

Pathology Laboratories

Location

Doctor Incharge

Alternate Authority

Mul

Dr. P.M. Sonuene

Medical Supdt. Rural Hospital, Mul

Ph.No. 62439

Shri S.A. Madulwar, H.A.

Sindewahi

Dr. P.N. Badnore

Medical Supdt. Rural Hospital Sindewahi

Ph.No. 66871

Shri P.Z. Bokde, H.A.

Nagbhid

Dr. V.R. Dashratwar, medical Supdt. Rural Hospital Nagbhid Ph.No. 66663

Shri Kalam, H.A.

Brahampuri

Dr. A.D. Gundawar

Medical Supdt. Rural Hospital Brahmapuri Ph.No. 72102

Rajura

Dr. Ramchandar J.K.

Medical Supdt. Rural Hospital Rajura

Ph.No. 52136

Gondpipri

Dr. S.R. Patil Medical updt. Rural Hospital Gondpipri

Ph.No. 56261

Warora

Dr. A.K. Jumde

Medical Supdt. Rural Hospital Warora Ph.No. 82214

Chimur

Dr. T.G. Dhote

Medical Supdt. Rural Hospital Chimur

Ph.No. 5519

Bhadrawati

Dr. R.B. Vaidya Medical Supdt. Rural Hospital Bhadrawati Ph.No. 66018

Blood Banks in the district (Govt and Private)

Hospital

Name of Doctor Incharge

Alternate Authority

General Hospital

Ninawe Hospital

Sanmitra Mandal

Ankur Hospital

Dr. Salunke, Civil Surgen Chandrapur

Ph.No. 52103 (O)

50301 ®

Dr. Ninave, Hospital Ward

Chandrapur

Phone No. 54884

55684

Dr. Andankar, Balaji Ward

Chandrapur

Ph.No. 52197

55344

Dr. Vilas Mule, Balaji Ward

Chandrapur

Ph.No. 50170

51522

Dr. A.V. Dasarwar

Resident Medical Officer

--

--

Ambulance Services (Govt and Private)

Qty.

Location

Doctor Incharge

Alternate Authority

1

Chandrapur

Dr. Salunke, Civil surgen

General Hospital, Chandrapur

Ph.No. 52103 (O)

50301 ®

Dr. A.V. Dasarwar

Resident Medical Officer

General Hospital, Chandrapur

Ph.No. 54853

1

Chandrapur

Shri R.N. Randive, Chief Officer Municipal Council, Chandrapur

Ph.No. 50220 (O)

55650 (O)

55221 ®

Shri Khobragade,

Mechanicle Supervisor

M.C. Chandrapur

Ph.No. 52800

1

Chandrapur

Durgapur Area

Sub Area Manager

Western Coal Fields

Durgapur Area

Ph.No. 55551

55961

--

1

Chandrapur

Padmapur Area

Sub Area Manager

Western Coal Fields Padmapur Area Ph.No. 52784

--

1

Chandrapur

Rayatwari Area

Sub Area Manager Western Coal; Fields

Rayyatwari Area Ph.No. 55927

--

1

Chandrapur

S.T. Shelke, Gen. O & M Chief Engineer, Super Thermal

Power Station, Chandrapur ( Urjanager)

Ph.No. 55393

Shri S.S. Khataokar

Deputy Chief Engineer,

Super Thurmal Power Stat. Chandrapur ( Urjanagar)

Ph.No. 53137 (O)

51802 ®

1

Chandrapur

Sub Area Manager Hindustan Lalpeth, Sub Area

Chandrapur Ph.No. 55732

---

1

Ballarppur

General Manager, Ballarpur Industries (Paper Mill) Ballarpur

Ph.No. 40542

(Shri Yogesh Sharma )

Deputy General Manager Ballarpur Industries Ballarpur

1

Ballarpur

Shri Ram Rode, Chief Officer

Municipal Council Ballarpur

Ph.No. 40343 (O)

40743 ® 

--

1

Warora

Personal Manager, Voltas LTD. Warora ( Chinaora Village) Ph.No. 82141

--

1

Bhadrawati

Shri G. Agrawal Dy. General manager Ordance Factory, Bhadrawati

Ph.No. 65010 (O)

65014(O)

65005(O)

--

1

Bhadrawati

Dr. Vaidya; Medical Superintendent Rural Hospital, Bhadrawati Ph. No. 66018

V.S. Bhoyar, E.O.H. Rural Hospital Bhadrawati

Ph.No. 66031

1

Warora

Dr. A. Jumde Medical Supdt.

Rural Hospital, Warora

Ph.No. 82214

V.S. Bhoyar, E.O.H. Rural Hospital Bhadrawati

Ph.No. 66031

1

Gadchandur

Dr. S.R. Patil Medical Supdt.

Rural Hospital Chandrapur

Ph.No. 56261

V.S. Bhoyar, E.O.H. Rural Hospital Bhadrawati

Ph.No. 66031

1

Rajura

Dr. Ramchandra J.K. Pillai

Medical Supdt.

Rural Hospital Rajura

Ph.No. 52136

V.S. Bhoyar, E.O.H. Rural Hospital Bhadrawati

Ph.No. 66031

1

Chimur

Dr. T.G. Dhote, Medical Supdt. Rural Hospital Chimur Ph.No. 5519

V.S. Bhoyar, E.O.H. Rural Hospital Bhadrawati

Ph.No. 66031

1

Gondpipri

Dr. S.R. Patil, Medical Supdt. Rural Hospital Gondpipri

Ph.No. 56261

V.S. Bhoyar, E.O.H. Rural Hospital Bhadrawati

Ph.No. 66031

1

Nagbhid

Dr. P.R. Dashratwar, Medical Supdt. Rural Hospital  Nagbhid Ph.No. 66663

V.S. Bhoyar, E.O.H. Rural Hospital Bhadrawati

Ph.No. 66031

1

Sindewahi

Dr. P.N. Badnore, Medical Supdt. Rural Hospital Sindewahi Ph.No. 66871

V.S. Bhoyar, E.O.H. Rural Hospital Bhadrawati

Ph.No. 66031

1

Mul

Dr. P.M. Sonune, Medical Supdt. Rural Hospital Mul

 Ph.No. 62439

V.S. Bhoyar, E.O.H. Rural Hospital Bhadrawati

Ph.No. 66031

1

Bhatadi

Sub Area Manager, W.C.L. Open Cast Bhatadi (Chandrapur)

Ph.No. 22301

V.S. Bhoyar, E.O.H. Rural Hospital Bhadrawati

Ph.No. 66031

1

Ballarpur

Sub Area Manager W.C.L.

Ballarpur

Ph.No. 40540

---

1

Rajura

Sub Area Manager, W.C.L.

Rajura  Ph.No. 52110

---

1

Tadali

Sub Area Manager, W.C.L. Wani Area

Ph.No. 84711

---

1

Ghugus

Sau area manager, W.C.L.

Ghugus Area

Ph.No. 75023

---

1

Majari

Sub Area Manager, W.C.L.

Majari Area

Ph.No. 85001

---

1

Awarpur

General Manager, L & T Cement Factory Awarpur

Ph.No. 6323

---

1

Manikgarh

(Gadchandur)

General Manager, Manikgarh Cement Factory Gadchandur

Ph.No. 6561 ( Shri Wardiya, J.P.)

---

1

Chandrapur

Shri Garb Executive Director, maharashtra Electrosemelt Chandrapur Ph.No. 51774

---

1

Warora

Maharogi Seva Samiti, Anandwan

---

Private Hospitals

Speciality

Location

Name of Doctor

Physicians

Chandrapur

Dr. S.W. Andankar

Ph.No. 50737 (H)

52711 ®

 

Chandrapur

Dr. Ajay Gandhi

Ph.No. 54106

 

Chandrapur

Dr. Shantikumar Kotpalliwar

Ph.No. 53031

 

Chandrapur

Dr. Kuber

Ph.No. 52456

56456

56466 ®

 

Chandrapur

Dr. K.B. Mehra

Ph.No. 50011

52049

 

Chandrapur

Dr. Raju Sainani

Ph.No. 53030

53838

56660

 

Chandrapur

Dr. A.V. Sonwalkar

Ph.No. 50163

 

Chandrapur

Dr. G.B. Wasalwar

Ph.No. 54411

55422

 

E.N.T. Surgens

Chandrapur

Dr. Pramod Mahajan

Ph.No. 53246

51382

 

Gynaecologists

Chandrapur

Dr. K.G. Andankar

Ph.No. 52197

55344

 

Chandrapur

Dr. Neelima Dhande

Ph.No. 53371

 

Chandrapur

Dr. Kavita Gandhi

Ph.No. 51133

54106

 

Chandrapur

Dr. Sandhya Kulkarni

Ph.No. 50621

 

Chandrapur

Dr. Sarala Murkhe

Ph.No. 56311

51411

 

Chandrapur

Dr. Rajilaxmi

Ph.No. 51580

56220

 

Chandrapur

Dr. S.S. Salphade

Ph.No. 50131

56131

 

Chandrapur

Dr. K.D. Shastrakar

Ph.No. 55672

53060

 

Orthopaedic Surgeons

Chandrapur

Dr. W.M. Gadegone

Ph.No.54704

53704

 

Chandrapur

Dr. I.S. Patiyal

Ph.No. 53247

54128

 

Chandrapur

Dr. Pramod Raut

Ph.No. 51344

51355

 

Opthalmologists

Chandrapur

Dr. Prakash Mamidwar

Ph.No. 51031

51033

55286

 

Paediatriciana

Chandrapur

Dr. Vijay Karmarkar

Ph.No. 54573

54033

24573 ®

 

Chandrapur

Dr. M.J. Khan

Ph.No. 56544

53544

 

Chandrapur

Dr. Kulkarni

Ph.No. 50621

55912

 

Chandrapur

Dr. Omprakash Rathi

Ph.No. 50303

 

Surgeon

Chandrapur

Dr. Ashok Bhukte

Ph.No. 55552

 

Chandrapur

Dr. J.P. Khobragade

Ph.No. 52346

 

Chandrapur

Dr. Arun Sainani

Ph.No. 52828

56135

 

Chandrapur

Dr. Mahaveer Soitkar

Ph.No. 53384

53383

 

Chandrapur

Dr. M.K. Tipnis

Ph.No. 51533

 

Bramhapuri

Dr. Satish Mendhe

Shivaji  Nagar Bramhapuri

Ph.No. 72262

 

Bramhapuri

Dr. Atul Nagre

Akhay Narsing Home

Janiwad Bramhapuri

Ph.No. 72144

 

Bramhapuri

Dr. Sutikagrah

Gujri Ward, Bramhapuri

Ph.No.

 

Bramhapuri

Dr. Khristandand Hospital

Khristandand Square, Brahmapuri

Ph.No.

 

Rajura

Cristian Massionarry

Akshay Dham Hospital, Virur Station

Rajura

Ph.No.

 

Warora

Dr. Waze Hospital

Azad Ward, Warora

Ph.No.

 

Warora

Matru Seva Sangh Sutikagrah

Railway Station Road, Warora

Ph.No.

 

Warora

Chandak Hospital

Padmawar Square, Warora

Ph.No.

 

Warora

Dr. Vikas Amte

Maharogi Seva Samiti

Anandwan, Warora

 

Educational Institutes

Location

Name of College and Principal

Alternate Authority

Chandrapur

(Engg.College

Dr. K.R. Dixit, Principal Chandrapur Engineering College chandrapur Ph.No. 53493

56610 52857 ®

Shri W.B. Gargelwar

Regoistrar

S.P. College of Law Ganj Ward Chandrapur

Dr. A.P. Pillai Principal

S.P. College Chandrapur

Ph.No. 56226 56621 58067 ®

S.P. College

Gan Ward, Chandraur

Shri V.S. Ainchwar, Prinipal S.P. College Chandrapur

Ph.No. 56778 52412

Shri H.Z. Bansod Registrar

Dr. Ambedkar College Dixabhumi Civil Line

Chandrapur

Shri I.T. Temare, Principal Dr. Ambedkar College, Chandrapur

Ph.No. 55776 51781 9R)

Shri M.R. Khobragade Registrar Ph.No. 56080

Janata Mahavidhyalaya Chandrapur

Shri P.M. Verma, Principal Janta Mahavidhyalaya, Alwar Sadan Civil Line Chandrapur Ph.No. 51794

55261 ®

Shri M.R. Nampalliwar

Registrar

N.P. Wasade College of Physicle Education, Civil Line Chandrapur

Shri Y.P. Rathod, Principal Behind T.V. Centre Chandrapur

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Arts & Commerce  College

Gondpipri

Principal Arts & Commecre College Gondipipri

Ph.No. 56269

J.W. College  Nagbhid

Shri D.S. Jangde, Principal New Sharda Colony, Bramhapuri Ph.No. 72065

Pro K.M. Raut

Vidhya Nagar Bramhapuri

Ph.No. 72757

N.S.S. Sarvodaya College of Arts & Commerce Sindewahi

Shri C.K. Dongred, Principal/Lecturerdf Ph.No. 8874

Shri Madre, Lecturar

N.S.S. Dyanesh Mahavidyalaya Navargaon

Shri Jayant barade, Principal Ph.No. 8336

8328

Location

Name of College and Principal

Alternate Authority

Neviabai Hitkarni College Bramphapuri

Principal Neviabai Hitkarni College Bramhapuri Ph.No. 72033

Arts & Commerce & Science College Anandwan, Warora

Dr. Sainis Principal Anand Niketan College Warora

Pro. Domre, Wise Principal Anand Niketan College Warora

Dr. Babasaheb Ambedkar College Bramphapuri

Principal Dr. Babasaheb Ambedkar College Brahmapuri Ph.No. 72066

Rular Educational Society Bramhapuri

Shri R.S. Raut Principal Ph.No. 72001

Shri R.B. Dalal

Dadasaheb Kannamwar College Mul

Principal Dadasaheb Kannamwar College  Mul

Rashtra Santh Tukdoji College Chimur

Principal Rashtra Santh Tukdoji College Chimur

List of Newspapers in Chandrapur district

Name of Newspaper

Name of Editor and Place of Publication

Mahavidharbha ( Marathi, Hindi)

Chandrapur Samachar

Khalsa Sandesh

Mahasagar

Ballarpur Times

Sannata

Vananchal

Shri Keshaorao Nalamwar, Editor Mul Road Chandrapur Ph.No. 55050

Shri Chandragupta Raipure, Editor Jatpura Ward Chandrapur

Ph.No. 53250 53251

Shri Harvindar Singh Dhunna, Editor Sarkar Nagar, Chandrapur

Ph.No. 53902

Suryakant Jain, Editor Chandrapur

Ph.No. 55409

Ratan Maheshwari, Editor Nagpur Road Chandrapur Ph.No.50899

Shri Champatrao Ladke, Editor Samadhi Ward Chandrapur

Ph.No. 53852

Shri Harcharan Singh Wadhwan, Editor Main Road Chandrapur Ph.No. 55562



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