25/07/2014
Status Report
Government Resolutions
Post Disaster Rehabilitation
  Project Related Rehabilitation
  International (ECMWF)
  India
  Regional
 
IMD - Mumbai
 
District - Gadchiroli

Introduction

As a part of the overall preparedness of the state, the Government of Maharashtra has a State Disaster Management Action Plan to support and strengthen the efforts of the district administration. In this context, every district has evolved it's own District Disaster Management Action Plan (DDMAP). It is expected that these multi-hazard response plans would increase the effectiveness of administrative intervention.

Multi-disaster Response Plan

The DDMAP addresses the districts’ response to disaster situations such as earthquakes, floods, cyclones, epidemics, off-site industrial disasters and roads accidents and fires. Some of these disasters such as floods and earthquakes affect large areas causing extensive damage to life, property and environment while others such as epidemics only affect large populations. In any case, the management of these disasters requires extensive resources and manpower for containment by remedial action.

The present plan is a multi-hazard response plan for the disasters and outlines the institutional framework required for managing such situations. However, the plan assumes a disaster specific form in terms of the actions to be taken by the various agencies involved in the disaster. The front-end or local level of any disaster response organisation will differ depending upon the type of disaster, but at the level of the back-end i.e., at the controlling level at the district it will almost remain same, for all types of disasters.

Objectives

The objectives of the District Disaster Management Action Plan are :

· To improve preparedness at the district level, through risk and vulnerability analysis , to disasters and to minimise the impact of disasters in terms of human, physical and material loss.

· To ascertain the status of existing resources and facilities available with the various agencies involved in the management of disasters in the district and make it an exercise in capability building of district administration. This enables the district to face a disaster in a more effective way and builds confidence across different segments of society. It will be a positive factor for long term development of the district.

· To utilise different aspects of disaster mitigation for development planning as a tool for location and area specific planning for development in the district.

· To use scientific and technological advances in Remote Sensing, GIS etc. in preparation of this plan with a veiw to ensure their continuous use for development planning.

· To develop a framework for proper documentation of future disasters in the district, to have an update on critical information essential to a plan, to critically analyse and appraise responses and to recommend appropriate strategies

· To evolve DDMAP as an effective managerial tool within the overall policy framework of Government of Maharashtra.

Response to disasters, in the absence of a defined plan, would be arbitrary leading to overemphasis of some actions and absence of other actions which could be critical. The objectives of any disaster management plan should be to localise a disaster and to the maximum extent possible contain it so as to minimise the impact on life, the environment and property. A formal plan for managing disasters is therefore necessary. This would include

a. pre-planning a proper sequence of response actions,

b. allocation of responsibilities to the participating agencies,

c. developing codes and standard operating procedures for various departments and relief agencies involved.

d. inventory of existing facilities and resources

e. mechanisms for effective management of resources

f. co-ordination of all relief activities including those of NGOs to ensure a coordinated and effective response.

g. Co-ordination with the State response machinery for appropriate support

h. Monitoring and evaluation of actions taken during relief and rehabilitation

"Outline of Vulnerability Assessment" prepared by CSSD/EMC has been used as the basic instrument to collate district level information to meet the database requirements for the preparation of DDMAP.


Policy Statement

The underlying policy of the DDMAP is to protect life, environment and property while ensuring mitigation of the disaster to the maximum extent possible, relief to those affected and restoration of normalcy at the earliest.

Essentially, communities draw their support from the social institutions, administrative structure, and values and aspirations they cherish. Disasters may temporarily disorganise the social units and the administrative system and disrupt their lives built around these values and aspirations. A systematic effort to put back the social life on its normal course with necessary technology support and resources will contribute significantly to the resilience of the community and nation.

This policy forms the basis of the DDMAP strategy. It aims at capacity building and prompt utilization of resources in a disaster situation through a partnership of the GOM, NGOs, Private Initiatives and the community. In pursuance with this policy, DDMAP addresses itself to strengthening the pre-disaster and post-disaster responses of various actors and stakeholders including the “victims” of the disaster.

OVERVIEW OF GADCHIROLI DISTRICT

Location

Gadchiroli District is located on the north-eastern side of the State of Maharashtra. It has heavy forest growth and tribal population.

Gadchiroli District is located between 18° 40' to 20° 50' N latitude and 79° 45' to 80° 55' E longitude and this essentially indicates that Gadchiroli District is located in the Deccan Plateau.

The adjoining districts are Bastar & Rajanandgaon in Madhya Pradesh on the east, Chandrapur on the west, Bhandara on the north & Karim Nagar Adilabad in Andhra Pradesh on the south.

Area and Administrative Divisions

Gadchiroli is the district headquarter in Nagpur Administrative Division and Collector Office is located at District headquarters. The territory of the District stretches over an area of 15434.00 Sq.kms. The district is divided into 3 Sub-divisions and these 3 Sub-divisions are having in all 12 tahsils.

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Name of Sub-division      Name of Talukas

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Gadchiroli Sub-division  1) Gadchiroli

                                             2) Chamorshi

                                             3) Dhanora

                                             4) Mulchera

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Desaiganj Sub-division 1) Kurkheda

                                             2) Korchi

                                             3) Wadsa

                                             4) Armori

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Aheri Sub-division             1) Aheri

                                             2) Etapalli

                                             3) Bhamragad

                                             4) Sironcha

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There are 1671 villages and 467 Gram Panchayats, 4 Municipal towns and 2 Municipal Councils. The total population of the District as per 1991 Census is 7,87,000.


Salient Physical Features and Land Use Pattern

Physical Features

The major area of the district is having undulating topography on large scale, except a narrow strip along Godavari and Pranhita rivers.

Main physiographic features of the district are the Sirkonda, Bhamragad, Aheri and Dandkarnaya hill ranges with high to moderate relief.

The low land of the district shows rolling topography with isolated hillocks.

The main river basin of the district is Godavari which borders the southern boundary of the district and flows west to east. The major sub-basins of the Godavari are Pranhita sub-basins which is given name after the confluence of two major sub-basins i.e. Wainganga and Wardha river near Chaprala village of Chamorshi Taluka and Indravati sub-basin. The Sub-tributaries of these two sub-basins show a network of parallel drainage pattern.

The eastern part of District in Dhanora, Ettapalli, Aheri and Sironcha talukas is covered by forests. Hilly terrain of Aheri, Bhamragad, Tipagad, Palasgad & Surajgad one of the highest hilly terrain Gadalgatta is there.

The predominant soil cover in the district is Clay, Clay-gravel, Sandy loam, Deep black soil, Reddish & Yellowish brown soils on hill slopes, Brown & Gray soils of plains and Laterite & Lateritic soil.

Land Use Pattern

Inhabited area - 208.81 Sq.kms. (1.354%)

Agricultural Area - 2012.00 Sq.kms. (13.04%)

Industrial Area - 1.09 Sq.kms. (0.006%)

Forest cover - 11569.00 Sq.kms. (74.96%)

Wastelands - 1642.90 Sq.kms.(10.64)

Drought Prone areas - NIL


Geology and Geomorphology

Geology

Geologically the district contains almost all geological formations except the Deccan Trap. The distribution of geological formation can be described in the following table

Scale Area Group Formation Location  
Recent Recent (G) Alluvium
(F) Laterite
Restricted along rivers and nalas banks. Dhanora, Kurkheda & Northern Etapalli 42416 Ha.
Gondwana   (E) Upper Sand stone, clays
(D) Lower Kamthi Ferrugineous sandstone and clays
Sironcha 43969 Ha.
Pre-Cambrian   (C) Vindhyan Sandstone Limestone,conglomerates
(B) Cuddapaha Shales
Aheri Sironcha 162877 Ha.
Archeans   (A) Oldest crystalline and metamorphitas i.e.Gneisses and schist with quartzite and banded Hematite and quartzite, Granite All Talukas Except Sironcha 1278286

The major lineament trends are NW-SE, NE-SW and N-S. The NW-SE lineaments are more common and can be correlated to the trend of the Godavari. The longer lineaments are considered to be deep seated fractures in the crust.

A shear zone encompassing two parallel sets of lineaments has been marked trending NW-SE near Chamorshi town. Copper mineralisation is associated with this shear zone.

Iron ore, base metals, barytes, limestone, corundum, talc are some of the important economic minerals occurring in the district.


Geomorphology


The district can be divided into six geomorphic units of structural, denudational and fluvial origin.

Structural Origin : Structural Hills/Ridges

Lithologically these consist of metamorphic rocks of Archaean and Proterozoic age.

Denudational Origin : Denudational Hills, Pediments/Pediplains

Denudational hills are low relief hills mostly covered with vegetation. While Pediments are concave surfaces developed at junction of hills with the plains and exhibit undulating topography and are dissected.

Fluvial Origin : Older and Younger Alluvial Plains

The Wainganga and the Godavari have developed extensive alluvial deposits along their courses. The older alluvial plain is a flat surface of large aerial extent gently sloping towards these rivers and representing an earlier cycle of deposition. The unconsolidated material in this unit consists of sand silt and kankar with thickness as high as 30m. The younger alluvial unit represents a later cycle of deposition.

Climate and Rainfall

Climate

Gadchiroli faces extreme variations in temperature with very hot summers and very cold winters and an average relative humidity of 62 percent.

The maximum recorded temperature till date was 46.3º Celsius on 20th May 1988.

The minimum recorded temperature of 5º Celsius was on 5th January 1992.

Rainfall

Gadchiroli District receives rainfall from the south-westerly winds mainly in the months of June, July, August and September.

July and August are the months during which the maximum rainfall as well as maximum continuous rainfall occurs.

The table below shows the rainfall data calculated over a period of 15 years from 1982-96.

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RAINFALL - 1982-1996

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Maximum annual rainfall 2277.00 (mm) 1990

(mm) for 15 years.

Average rainfall 1510.00 (mm)

Maximum rainfall 435.00 (mm)

in a day

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Socio-economic Features

Demographic Features

According to the 1991 Census, the demographic features observed in Gadchiroli district are as follows :-

Total Number of households : 1,63,000

Total Population : 7,87,000

Total Male Population : 3,98,000

Total Female Population : 3,89,000

Sex ratio : 977

Urban Population : 69,000

Rural Population : 7,18,000

Percentage of Urban Population : 8.7 %

to total Population

Population density : 51 per Sq.km.

Literacy rate : 42.95 %

Male Literacy rate : 56.57 %

Female Literacy rate : 28.84 %

SC/ST (Scheduled Castes/Scheduled Tribes)

SC percentage : 12.20 %

ST percentage : 38.75 %

Population below poverty line : 55.74 %

ST population, SC population & population below poverty line are mainly affected by Disasters like Flood, Earthquake and mostly by epidemics. These sections of society will require special upliftment through education, social and employment programme to develop in them the capability to minimise risk factors from epidemics, floods and earthquake. Housing pattern needs to be made pucca and safe for these sections of society in this tribal district. Most important improvement will be making available potable drinking water & safe and sanitary housing.

Urban Centres

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Name of the Population Population Major Occupational Patters

Urban Density

Centre

Farmer Agri. Self Empl Other

Labour worker worker

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1) Gadchiroli 29565 1015.98 37.70 22.95 1.64 37.71

2) Wadsa 19794 741.35 17.81 31.51 38.63 12.32

3) Aheri 10982 1152.00 12.08 12.79 32.57 39.55

4) Allapalli 8224 2233.00 4.28 5.32 65.75 24.63

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Major Rural Centre (population more than 5000)

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Name of the Population Population Major Occupational Patterns

Rural Density

Centre

Farmer Agri. Self Empl Other

Labour worker worker

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1) Kurkheda 5310 1076 16.73 21.70 30.96 30.66

2) Kurud 5024 576 48.12 39.89 7.07 4.92

3) Kunghada (Rai) 5684 264 57.77 32.10 4.48 5.65

4) Chamorshi 10175 309 32.11 34.67 15.49 17.73

5) Armori 15263 669 17.84 45.85 21.20 15.09

6) Sironcha 5401 1986 10.57 15.52 36.33 37.58

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Historical And Religious Centres

Information on historical and religious centres is compiled to assess the possible influx of large populations on specific occasions and the service demand generated. This is important specifically with respect to administration's response for management of transport, health services, law and order, facilities for food and sanitation in order to control epidemics, road accidents and fires.

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Name of the historical and Periods of festive Estimated tourist or

religious centre and nearest occasions, months visiting population

Urban or Major rural centre

listed above

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1) Aheri place Ta:- Aheri "Dashera" for 3 day's period 25000 to

Nearest major rural centre Months: September/October 30000

Aheri Ta:- Aheri

2) Markanda Deo Ta:-Chamorshi Mahashivratri festival for 50000 to

Nearest major rural centre one week from the day 60000

Chamorshi Months: February/March

3) Chaprala Ta:-Chamorshi Hanuman Jayanti day for 10000 to

Nearest major rural centre 3 days period in April/ 12000

Ashti Ta:-Chamorshi May month.

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Seasonal Migration

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Purpose Areas (specify Talukas) Period Estimated

(Calendar months) population

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Tendu Leaves Gadchiroli, April to May 13825

collection Kurkheda

Korchi, Dhanora

Etapalli,Bhamragad

Sironcha,Aheri, Chamorshi

Mulchera

Bamboo Gadchiroli December to June 6700

Cutting Mulchera, Etapalli

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Note: This migration is temporary for two to six months. They are coming from Balaghat, Bastar & Jabalpur District of Madhya Pradesh.

 


Agriculture and Cropping Pattern

The main agricultural crops in the district along with the cropping period and market area is given in the table below:

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Types Names Cropping period Market (District,

State, Export)

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Major Crops

(Irrigated) District

(KHARIF) Paddy June to Nov. Gadchiroli-State

RABBI Wheat Sept.to February Gadchiroli

Gram Sept.to January Gadchiroli

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Major Crops

(Non-Irrigated

(KHARIF) Tur June to Nov. Gadchiroli

Mung June to January Gadchiroli

Pulses June to October Gadchiroli

Soyabean June to October Gadchiroli-State

Sesamum June to October Gadchiroli

Cotton June to January Gadchiroli-State

RABBI Wheat Sept.to February Gadchiroli

Gram Sept.to January Gadchiroli

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Major Cash Crops Soyabean June to October State

(Kharif+Rabbi) Cotton June to January State

Groundnut June to October Gadchiroli

Sesamum Sept.to Nov. Gadchiroli

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Statistical details regarding are under forests, cultivation, Non-agricultural use and fallow lands are as indicated below :-

1) Total Area of the District - 1543380 Hectares

2) Area under forests - 1156900 Hectares

3) Land not available for cultivation - 15000 Hectares

4) Land under Non-agricultural use - 41000 Hectares

5) Fallow Land/Waste Land - 26000 Hectares

6) Other fallow land - 47000 Hectares

7) Land under cultivation - 199525 Hectares

8) Net area under irrigation - 52253 Hectares

9) Total area under irrigation - 52994 Hectares

10) Area under foodgrain crops - 198250 Hectares

11) Classification of Land Holders

A) Number of cultivators holding - 69613

less than 2 hectares land.

B) Number of cultivators having - 37722

net 2-10 hectares land.

C) Number of cultivators having - 1542

more than 10 hectares land

D) Total land holders - 108877Area under Crops as Percentage of Total Geographical Area of the Tahsils

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Gadchiroli Armori Kurkheda Dhanora Ettapalli Sironcha

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Geog.Area 773.40 1278.42 1495.97 1950.33 3954.70 872.30

(Hectares)

Cotton --- --- --- --- --- 0.03

Jowar 2.42 0.78 --- 0.02 0.01 6.58

Wheat 0.16 0.39 0.19 --- --- ---

Fruits & Veg 0.20 0.18 0.08 0.04 0.01 0.07

Barley --- --- --- --- --- ---

Rice (Paddy) 19.23 13.04 10.19 8.40 3.82 8.24

Groundnut --- 0.04 0.03 --- --- 0.07

Oilseeds 0.58 0.61 0.74 0.25 0.01 2.54

Pigeonpea --- --- --- --- --- ---

Spices 0.21 0.19 0.19 0.15 0.02 0.02

Others 4.74 3.45 1.47 1.15 0.19 2.79

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Aheri Chamorshi Desaiganj Korchi Bhamragad Mulchera

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Geog.Area 2723.74 1023.31 192.48 555.99 449.77 163.39

(Hectares)

Cotton --- 0.15 --- --- --- ---

Jowar 1.76 5.74 2.97 --- 0.01 4.36

Wheat --- 0.19 1.83 0.01 --- 0.04

Fruits & Veg. 0.02 0.38 0.99 0.04 0.03 0.12

Barley --- --- --- --- --- ---

Rice (Paddy) 2.96 23.89 58.95 15.92 15.82 31.62

Groundnut --- --- 0.46 --- --- ---

Oilseeds 0.74 2.42 2.46 0.38 0.02 3.97

Pigeonpea --- --- --- --- --- ---

Spices 0.01 0.39 1.04 0.16 0.04 0.14

Others 0.61 7.49 11.85 7.55 0.52 1.94

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River Systems and Dams

Rivers

The entire Gadchiroli district is included in the drainage basin of Godavari river.

At the southwestern boundary of the district, near Sironcha, Godavari enters the district and flows eastwards for about 50 km along the southern boundary of the district. After it's confluence with the Indravati, at the southeastern corner, the Godavari turns south into Andhra Pradesh.

The western boundary for a distance of 225 km is formed by the flow of the Wainganga river ; Khobragadi nadi, Satnala, Kathani and Mirgadola are major tributaries.

The Pranhita river, formed by the confluence of Wainganga and Wardha rivers, forms the southwesten boundary for 90 km till it's confluence with the Godavari. Dina Nadi is the main tributary.

The Indravati enters the district near Aheri and forms the southeastern boundary for a distance of 120 km before joining the Godavari. Nimbra, Kotrai and Bandia are the major tributaries.

Dams

There is at present only one major dam project i.e. Tultuli on Khobragadi river which has not been completed. Apart from this, eleven medium dams are proposed but work has not yet been completed. Dina Project on Dina river - is completed & is a source of irrigation.

Name of Dam Location of Capacity River on which Estimated time

Dam Dam is built for completion

Major Dams

Sati Palasgad 121.00 Sati river Time schedule

Tal.Kurkheda depends upon the availability of funds

Tultuli Dawandi 225.05 Khobragadi Time schedule

Tal.Armori river depends upon the availability of funds

Name of Dam Location of Capacity River on which Estimated time

Dam Dam is built for completion

Minor Dams

Chenna Mukadi 15.00 Chenna river Depends upon the

Tal.Mulchera funds

Karwafa Makepaili 32.44 Kuthar river Depends upon the

Tal.Gadchiroli funds

Pohar Nala Tadgaon 62.00 Pohar Nala Depends upon the

Tah.Korchi availability of

funds

Kobragadi Near Korchi 69.00 Khobragadi

Tal.Korchi

Irrigation Projects

Location of the Project(s) Catchment area Target Command area

Dina project 13.78 km² 113.56 km²


Power Stations and Electricity Installations

There is no power generation station in the district.

There exists a number of 66 KV and 33 KV sub-stations well distributed within the district.

Sr.No.

Name of Sub Stations

Name of village or town.

1

132 KV  Sub Station

  Aashti

2

66 KV Sub Station

1)      Gadchiroli

2)      Allapalli

3)      Etapalli

4)      Jimalgatta

5)      Sironcha

3

33 KV Sub Stations

1)      Wadsa

2)      Kurkheda

3)      Korchi

4)      Malewada

5)      Aarmori

6)      Delanwadi

7)      Potegaon

8)      Dhanora

9)      Murumgaon

10)  Gatta

11)   Chamorshi

12)   Ghot.


Industries

The extent of industrialisation gets reflected by the number of industrial estate and industrial activity and in terms of movement of cargo.

¨ Number of Industrial Estates : 1

¨ Number of chemical industries/tank farms : 1

¨ Number of pipelines carrying chemicals : Nil

¨ Number of potentially hazardous locations : 1

¨ Number of vehicles carrying hazardous raw materials for industries (during a month): 1

¨ Number of vehicles passing through the district carrying hazardous materials for industries (during a month): Nil

¨ Number of container terminals: Nil

¨ Types of Industries: Paper products, Wood based.

The details on each industrial estate and fact sheet on each industry have been attached in Annexure 1.

Kotagal M.I.D.C. area is nearly 5 kms. from Gadchiroli city and is the smallest industrial Estate of Vidarbha Region.

Ballarpur Industries limited unit Ashti is nearly 70 km. away from Gadchiroli.

Due to forest conservation act, particularly Zudpi Jungle problem & Naxal activities in Gadchiroli District, industrialisation both for small scale sector & medium scale industries is very poor, hence the economy is wholly Agriculture & Forest labour based. There is absence of Forest based industries also. The tribals & scheduled caste sectors continue to be suffering from poor economic conditions and hence are always prone to disasters caused by floods, heavy rains and health problems.

Transport and Communication Network

· Number of National Highways : 1

· Length (in kms) of National Highways : 50 (proposed)

· State Highway (in kms.) : 1149

· ZP roads (in kms.) : 2118

· Number of Bridges on rivers : 244

· Number of ST depots : 2

· Number of villages not accessible by ST : 271

· Number of Ports of jetties : --

· Number of boats : 9

· Number of railways stations with mail/express halts : --

· Number of railway bridges : 13

· Non-electrified railway routes (in kms) : 18.48

· Electrified railway routes (in kms) : --

· Number of unmanned railway crossings : 2

· Number of airports/air strips : --

· Number of Sub-Post Offices & branches :


Proposed Development

Any major developmental changes that are to be undertaken (say in the next five years)

New afforestation : 243.17 km² area covered

New area declared as : 104.38 km² area covered

reserved forest/sanctuary

New Industrial estates (undertaken/proposed)

Name of industrial estate : 8 mini industries estate are proposed at different places

(MIDC)

Location of the industries : Kurkheda Korchi Dhanora Mulchera

Tq.Kurkhed Ta.Korchi Tq.Dhonara Tq.Mulchera

Etapalli Bhamragad Aheri Sironcha

Tq.Etapalli Tq.Bhamragad Tq.Aheri Tq.Sironcha

Nearest urban/Major rural : Kurkheda Korchi Dhanora Etapalli Bhamragad

Centre Aheri Sironcha

Large industries set-up or proposed :

Name of the industries : Two large industrial estate are proposed

Location of the industries : 1) At Wadsa, Ta. Desaiganj (Wadsa)

2) At Ashti, Tq. Chamorshi

Type of industries : Nil

RISK ASSESSMENT AND VULNERABILITY ANALYSIS

Economic, Occupational, Social and Educational Profile of the Population

Physical features and land use pattern of the district indicate that agriculture is the main activity of the district. The total agricultural are is 2012.00 Sq.km. that is 13.03% of the total area of the district

Of these 200509 ha. is the net sown area 29300 ha. is barren and uncultivable land, and culturable waste land of 48000 ha. Paddy is main crop Wheat, Pulses and Jowar are the side crops and Mango is the main plantation.

77.73 % of the total area is under forest cover.

The distribution of urban and rural population shows that 8.7 % of the population is urban.

This is in spite of being a predominantly agricultural district thus indicating that there is a surplus rural population.

SCs and STs (socially vulnerable sections) account for 50.95 percent of the total population.

The overall area for industrial use accounts for only 1.00 Sq.km. i.e. 0.001 percent of the total area.

The number of main urban centres are 4.

In one of these centres, the industrial workers account for more than 20 percent, in 14 centres the percentage of industrial workers is less than 10 percent. This essentially indicates that urbanisation is moving faster than industrialisation, thereby creating problems of unemployment, urban poverty, and urban concentrations.

14 % of the urban population is in the slums and 70 % of the population is below poverty line.

Seasonal migration is a temporary phenomenon lasting for two months to six months and basically the influx is from the adjoining state of Madhya Pradesh (essentially contract labour). The influx of migrants is more in the Tendu leaves collection & Bamboo cutting.

While there are 3 historical and religious centres in Gadchiroli, Aheri, Markanda Dev & Chaparala are religious centres and places.

There is moderate influx of tourist population in the district with only the rainy season and the months of December and January being lean periods.

The overall literacy percent of the district is 42.95 % whereas among the SCs and STs, it is 55 percent indicating the vulnerability of the entire population to disasters like floods.


Disaster Specific Proneness

Floods

The district can be divided into two basin areas - Vainganga river basin & Indravati river basin. In the district there are three main rivers, Godavari, Indravati and Vainganga have a possibility of flooding during monsoons. In addition, there are a number of nalas and smaller rivers like Gadvi, Khobragadi, Kathani, Pamalgautam.

Nalas are non-perennial streams and are generally prone to flash floods, these flash floods also cause loss of life & poverty at local level. Many of these nalas have a large catchment area and therefore offer opportunities for medium or minor irrigation projects.

One can see some medium projects being undertaken which guarantees some irrigation in the absence of adequate rainfall, and also as a control measure against flash floods.

There are only two major dam out of which one is under construction whereas there are 4 medium dams under construction (Planning stage). These dams will also help in the mitigation of flash floods in the downstream region. Rivers on the other hand are perennial streams.

Watershed management schemes, undertaken by Agriculture department, are not necessarily planned for flood prevention. But regular watershed schemes in villages have contributed a lot in reducing flooding of small rivers and nalas originating in the district.

9.89 % of the population live in flood prone area. Total number of flood affected villages are 81, whereas 35 villages are in blue zone and 150 villages are in Red zone.

During the last ten years, 3 major flood occurrences with 10 deaths and total loss of approximately Rs. 250 lakhs. The amount spent on relief and rehabilitation has been Rs. 231.7 lakhs.

Based on the occurrence of past floods, the main floods prone areas have been identified as along the following

Sr.      Name of           Flooding           Location and Extent of       Corresponding 

No.     the river           frequency         Area Inundated (worst       Estimated         

                                     over                 case) in sq.km.                       Flood Damage 

                                    Years                                                                 in Rs.                

1)  Vainganga,            1992                Affected 21 villages              90.00 Lac.        

    Pranhita,              once in 5-             area damage 362.2 hec.                              

    Gadhavi,               10 years             Paddy crops, damage                                

    Pamal Gautam,                                  534 houses & 92 cattle                              

    Indravati & Godavari                                                            

2)  Vainganga,            1994                   Affected 34 villages              90.00 Lac.          

    Pranhita,                 once in 5-           area damage 56951 hec                             

    Gadhavi,                10 years              Paddy crops, damage                                

    Pamal Gautam,                                  1706 houses and 1223                               

    Indravati,                                            cattle less.                                                   

    & Godavari.                                                                                                       

Flood affected villages in Gadchiroli District.

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Taluka Flood affected Villages in Villages in

villages Blue zone Red zone

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Gadchiroli -- -- --

Dhanora -- -- --

Chamorshi Markanda-dev -- --

Mulchera -- -- --

Armori Waghala -- --

Desaiganj 1) Arattondi -- --

2) Kinhala

Kurkheda 1) Kurkheda -- --

2) Kumbhitola

3) Mohagaon Or Wakdi -- --

4) Dhanegaon -- --

5) Malewada -- --

Korchi -- -- --

Aheri 1) Wangepalli 1) Wangepalli 1) Yellaram

2) Gad-aheri 2) Gad-aheri 2) Yedmamlla

3) Gad-aheri Bamni 3) Gad-aheri Bamni 3) Palle

4) Chinchgundi 4) Chinchgundi 4) Tadguda

5) Avanpalli 5) Avanpalli 5) Ramangatta

6) Vyakatraopetha M 6) Vyakatraopetha M. 6) Sallewada

7) Indaram S. 7) Indaram S. 7) Mandra

8) Devalmari 8) Devalmari 8) Dhedgair

9) Katra B.S. 9) Katra B.S. 9) Mukhanpalli

10) Katra B.M. 10) Katra B.M. 10) Pattigaon M.

11) Katra K.S. 11) Katra K.S. 11) Sindha K.

12) Katra K.M. 12) Katra K.M. 12) Modka K.

13) Modumturra 13) Modumturra 13) Kamsur

14) Aavalmari 14) Aavalmari 14) Lakhanguda K.

15) Lankachen 15) Lankachen 15) Kalled

16) Vyankatpur K. 16) Vyankatpur K. 16) Jonganeguda

17) Biradghat 17) Biradghat 17) Bhaswapur

18) Metigudam 18) Metigudam 18) Regulwahi

19) Metapur 19) Metapur 19) Yenkabandi

(Mahagaon tola) (Mahagaon tola)

20) Damarncha 20) Damarancha 20) Ambezari

21) Bhangaram petha21) Bhangaram petha 21) Perpalli

22) Katepalli 22) Katepalli --

23) Kotapalli 23) Kotapalli --

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Taluka Flood affected Villages in Villages in

villages Blue zone Red zone

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Sironcha 1) Jafarbad chek -- 1) Bodra

2) Kanwalpeth chek -- 2) Moyabinpetha

3) Kanwalpeth R. -- 3) Darshawada

4) Glassflord petha -- 4) Kothapalli

5) Medaram Mal -- 5) Vithalrao petha

6) Vyankatapur -- 6) Vithalrao petha

7) Garkapetha -- 7) Vithalrao petha

8) Raghapetha or -- 8) Ramlapetha

Pochampalli

9) Raghapetha Mal -- 9) Zeda

10) Nagram -- 10) Bogtaguddam

11) Mudukrishnapur -- 11) Narsinghapalli

12) Mugapur -- 12) Yella

13) Petipaka V.L. -- 13) Pirmida

14) Tumnur -- 14) Chityal

15) Aandhrapetha -- 15) Barsewada

16) Vaddham -- --

17) Pochampalli -- --

18) Kottapalli -- --

19) Chintarvell -- --

20) Lakshmidevipetha -- --

21) Ankisa mal -- --

22) Balmutampalli -- --

23) Asaralli -- --

24) Ankisa chek -- --

25) Sunkaralli -- --

26) Korla Mal -- --

27) Sonapalli -- --

28) Rameshaguddam -- --

29) Karjali -- --

30) Kotur R. -- --

31) Gramlkoda R. -- --

32) Somanur M. -- --

33) Pataguddam -- --

34) Rayguddam -- --

35) Pethalaya -- --

Taluka Flood affected Villages in Villages in

villages Blue zone Red zone

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Etapalli 1) Zarewada -- 1) Manewada

-- -- 2) Karka B.

-- -- 3) Zari

-- -- 4) Gaddhapalli

-- -- 5) Koidul

-- -- 6) Kttegtta

-- -- 7) Parmalgondi

-- -- 8) Hedri

-- -- 9) Reknar

-- -- 10) Malampada

-- -- 11) Surjagad

-- -- 12) Pursalgondi

-- -- 13) Titoda

-- -- 14) Jambhiya

-- -- 15) Modske

-- -- 16) GilnagundaEtapalli

-- --

-- -- 18) Mukhada

-- -- 19) Bhumakan

-- -- 20) Jijawandi

-- -- 21) Javeli K.

-- -- 22) Kundam

-- -- 23) Pipli Burgi

-- -- 24) Kachler

-- -- 25) Kotmi

-- -- 26) Kodawahi

-- -- 27) Bhapda

-- -- 28) Sohgaon

-- -- 29) Velmagad

-- -- 30) Kurumwada

-- -- 31) Dolanda

-- -- 32) Shirpur

-- -- 33) Todgatta

-- -- 34) Wangeturi

-- -- 35) Fulkoti

-- -- 36) Mendhri

-- -- 37) Gardewada

-- -- 38) Nendwahi

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Taluka Flood affected Villages in Villages in

villages Blue zone Red zone

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Bhamragad 1) Bhamragad 1) Bhamragad 1) Mannerajaram

2) Palli 2) Palli 2) Marampalli

3) Kasansur 3) Kasansur 3) Madvela

4) Zorguda 4) Zorg uda 4) Chichola

5) Yechali 5) Yechal i 5) Jijgaon

6) Bramhanpalli 6) Bramhanpalli 6) Boricha

7) Dubbagudam 7) Dubbagudam 7) Dubbagudam

8) Jonawahi 8) Jonawahi 8) Jonawahi

9) Mokela 9) Mokela 9) Mundapuri

10) Sippanpalli 10) Sippanpalli 10) Sippanpalli

11) Parli 11) Parli 11) Kannangatta

12) Renka 12) Renka 12) Pendheli

13) Kohakapari

14) Bejura

15) Tirkapetha

16) Kipat

17) Halwer

18) Kucher

19) Nargunda

20) Khandinainwadi

21) Padhtur

22) Koti

23) Pidmoli

24) Mirgudwancha

25) Krishnar

26) Devhur

27) Podharkoti

28) Gundarwahi

29) Halkandi

30) Mordpar

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Total of all talukas 81 Villages 35 Villages 105 Villages

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Earthquakes

No detailed study of Earthquake Vulnerability has been conducted in this District so far. However due to Jabalpur Earthquake this District has also developed possibility of Earthquake and detailed study is necessary.

The Collector may appoint study group comprising of senior officers of Geological Survey of India, Irrigation Deptt, Geology & Mining Deptt. of Govt. of Maharashtra.

GSDA & Directorate of Geology of Mining have been asked to prepare draft Disaster Management Plan for Earthquake on the lines of action taken by the District Collector, Nagpur in 1993.

Industrial And Chemical Accidents

In this district there is only one industry using chemicals and acids : the Ballarpur Paper Mill Unit at Ashti. In this mill only sulphuric & hydrochloric acids are used for cleaning & purification of raw materials, intermediate products, final product & waste materials.(The details are given in the Fact Sheet in Annexure I) . Manufacture of Paper & paper suds only which is approximately 100 M.T. during the year.

At present fire brigades are available only at Gadchiroli & Wadsa Desaiganj.

Chemical accidents take place primarily because of transportation of acids, Petrol & Diesel & L.P.G. using trucks.

There are four petrol & diesel pump at Gadchiroli, Wadsa (Desaiganj) & Allapalli.

Fires

As for fires the following areas are vulnerable :

Forest Fires :- The major forest area i.e. 75 % are covered on the East, South & North part of district, Kurkheda, Korchi, Dhanora, Chamorshi, Mulchera, Ettapalli, Bhamragad, Aheri & Sironcha taluka having heavy forests.

Tendu leaves Godown all over the districts.

Adiwasi & Scheduled tribe localities which use woods and grass for hut construction.

Commercial area located in Desaiganj, Gadchiroli & Armori.

Naxalites sometimes truck bamboo stocks of forest Deptt.

At present five brigades are available only at Gadchiroli & Desaiganj. In Aheri-Sironcha-Bhamragad Belt, there is need for one stationary fire brigade at Allapalli with forest Deptt.

Road Accidents

As reported by the R.T.O. 573 Road Accidents occurred during last 6 years

There are 152 villages and towns along the road sides.

There are 1149 Kms. state highway & 2118 Kms. ZP roads.

Major roads are Narrow & kutcha roads.

Road accidents take place due to violation of traffic rules.

A Mobile crane is required to remove the damaged vehicles in the event of an accident so that traffic congestion can be avoided.


Epidemics

Illiteracy in the Gadchiroli district is 57.05 %

In tribal areas constant preventive action for infectious diseases like cholera, Gastro, Malaria, etc. is necessary. Health Department of ZP & Civil Surgeon have to take constant preventive measures for potable drinking water & timely Medical Aid. (Case studies on major disaster episodes in the district are given in Annexure III)

There are 35 villages in red zone and 105 villages in blue zone.

Roads and Bridges must connect the remote tribal pockets to ensure that the people who need medical attention can reach the Primary Health Centres without much hardship.

Mobile Health Centres have to be introduced in the tribal areas, especially in remote locations.

Water testing Laboratories must be set up to test water quality.

271 villages are not accessible by the Maharashtra State Road Transport Corporation.

Disaster Probability

According to district administration, the probability of disaster occurrence and the possible intensity of disasters, based on the earlier history is given below.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Damage Earthquake Floods Cyclones Epidemics Industrial Fires Road

& Chemical Accidents Accident

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Loss of Low Medium Low Low Low Low Low

Lives

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Injuries Low Medium Low Low Low Low Low

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Damage to & Low Medium Low Low Low Low Low

Destruction

of Property

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Damage to Low Medium Low Low Low Low Low

cattle & live

stock

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Damage to Low Medium Low Low Low Low Low

subsistence

and crops

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Disruption of Low Medium Low Low Low Low Low

life style

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Loss of Low Medium Low Low Low Low Low

Livelihood

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Disruption Low Medium Low Low Low Low Low

of service

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Damage Low Medium Low Low Low Low Low

to Infra-

structure

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Impact on Low Medium Low Low Low Low Low

National

Economy

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Social and Low Medium Low Low Low Low Low

Psychological

after-effects

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Specific Vulnerability of Systems and Services to Disaster Events

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Specific | Vulnerable to

vulnerability of | --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

| Earth- Floods Cyclones Epide- Fires Road Indl. &

| quake mics Acci- Chemical

| -dent Accident

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Transport systems Yes Yes Yes Nil Yes Yes Yes

(road Network)

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Transport systems No No No Nil No No No

(rail Network)

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Power supply Yes Yes Yes Nil No No No

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Water supply Yes Yes No Nil Yes No Yes

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Sewage Yes Yes Yes Nil Yes Yes Yes

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Hospitals Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Food stocks Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

& supplies

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Communication Yes Yes Yes Nil Yes Yes Yes

systems (Tele-

communication)

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Ranking and Probability of Disaster Episodes in the District

Event | Ranking of events | Probability of future occurrence

| in terms of past | -------------------------------------------------

| occurrence | High | Medium | Low

------------------ -------------------------- ------------ -------------------------------------

Earthquake } Low | -- | -- | Low

------------------} Increase -----------------------------------------------

Floods Medium : -- | Medium | --

------------------} in the -----------------------------------------------

Cyclones } Low | -- | -- | Low

----------------- } reporting -----------------------------------------

Epidemics } Low | -- | -- | Low

----------------- } of events ---------------------------------------------

Industrial } | -- | -- | Low

& Chemical } Low | | |

Accidents } | | |

-----------------} ----------------------------------------------

Firs } Low | -- | -- | Low

-----------------} ----------------------------------------------

Road } Low | -- | -- | Low

Accidents } | | |

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Although the probability of Earthquakes and floods have been ranked as low and medium respectively, considering the recent seismic observations with respect to earthquake and the loss of life and properly resulting from floods, both earthquake and flood will have to be considered as highly probable disaster which can inflict heavy losses.



Annexure I - Information On Industrial Estates

Name of the Industrial Estate : M.I.D.C. Gadchiroli

Location in the form of an address : At Kotgal, Ta.Dist. Gadchiroli

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

No. of industries in the 5

estate

No of major Hazardous and Nil

polluting industries

Total work force in industries 50

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

Annexure II - Information Related To Fire Brigade

Town with fire brigade : 2 nos.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Location Manpower No.of Fire Length Nos. and height Other fire

engines of pipe of ladders Equipment

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Gadchiroli 3 1 200 ft 1 - 50 ft 1 Water tanker

1 Cylinder fire

fighting equip.

Wadsa 6 2 120 ft 1 - 50 ft 1 Water tanker

1 Fountain

nozzle

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Distance Of Fire Brigade From MIDC

Location - MIDC (Gadchiroli) at Kotgul, Ta. Gadchiroli

Nearest fire brigade station - Gadchiroli

Distance in K.M. - 5 km.

Annexure III - Fact Sheets of Hazardous Industry

Fact Sheet 1

I. Factory identity: Ballarpur Industries Limited. Unit - Ashti.

II. Address: Village - Ellure, Tahsil - Chamorshi, Dist. - Gadchiroli – 442707

III. Location - Ellure

IV. Contact Persons : 1. Mr.Supratim Kundu, Works Manager.

2. Mr.R.P.Srivastava, Dy. Manager (Pers.)

V. Principle activities : Manufacture of paper and Paper sacks for each plant.

VI. Inventory of the hazardous chemicals : Sulphuric Acid - 2 cu.m. for 10 Days,

Hydrochloric Acid - 2 cu.m.. for 10 Days.

VII. Consequences of Major hazards from storage for each chemical - None.

VIII. Consequences of Major hazards from processing - Burning of skin if it comes with Human body contact

IX. Physical range of consequences

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Storage | Manufacturing

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Near storage tank, max. area | Not applicable

effected 2/3 m if leakage occurs |

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

X. An inventory of personal protective equipment in the factory premises: Dress and

safety cap.

XI. Action required : None of actions given below required except medical service which is available in mills

Medical Service - Dr. A.V.Narula, M.D. Ph.No. (07135) - 44146 ; Dr. B. Narula, M.B.B.S.

XII. Estimated Response time - Within 5 minutes for Medical services.

XIII. Layouts of the plants - Enclosed

(to be updated as & when expansions, modernisation occur)

Annexure IV - Information related to Petroleum, LPG & Chemical Products Transportation

Sr. Location Name of Service Capacity Transportation Name of

No. Station (LPG/ of storage in a month Company

Petrol Pump)

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

1) Gadchiroli Shri.Gas Agency-LPG 550 cylinders 3 trucks Hindustan

Petroleum

2) Wadasa Wadsa Gas Agency-LPG 550 cylinders 1 trucks Hindustan

Petroleum

3) Gadchiroli Moreshwar Service-PP 20000 Ltrs. P 4 trucks Bharat

Centre Gadchiroli 22000 Ltrs. D 14 trucks Petroleum

4) Gadchiroli Shrungarpawar Service 15000 Ltrs. P 4 trucks Indian Oil

Service station-PP 20000 Ltrs. D 15 trucks

5) Wadsa Jejwani Service - PP 15000 Ltrs. P 4 trucks Indian Oil

Station, Wadasa 20000 Ltrs. D 14 trucks

6) Allapalli Bhaskarwar Service-PP 15000 Ltrs. P 4 trucks Indian Oil

Station, Allapalli 20000 Ltrs. D 14 trucks

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Annexure V Case Studies of Major Disaster Episodes in the District

Episode 1

· Type of Episode : Gasto enteritis Epidemic

· Location: Year 91-92 (Rural); Entire district ; 1483 Attacks; 110 Deaths

· Date:15.6.91 to 30.8.92

· Reasons assigned : Contaminated drinking water. People in the rural areas were using the drinking water from the resources such as rivers, wells, nalas and farm pond where water contained polluting substance.

· Warning Systems used: Stopping of drinking water from all other sources except identified chlorinated sources through Health workers, Gram sevaks, Anganwadi workers & teachers of Primary schools.

· Community response to Warning system : Effective

· Administrative response to Warning system : Effective

· Assessment of Administrative preparedness : Excellent

· Area Affected (number of village): 58 villages

· Extent of Damage : 110 Deaths

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Name of Department Type of Relief/ Expenditure

Compensation and

rehabilitation

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Health Deptt. Opening of Isolation Done by Local G.P./

wards. P.H.C.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

· Organizational Structure evolved to manage the emergency : Health Department and other State Govt. Department like Revenue Deptt, Rural Development Department.

· Nature of support from the state and central authorities: From State Government |- Funds for medicine/equipment are Received from State Government and Zilla Parishad.

· Methods used for mobilizing resources: NGO Community Response, Health Education to masses by Team of Doctors/Nurses/HA's

· Legal or Procedural bottlenecks experienced in managing the situation: Preventing Blind belief & superstition and to some extent illiteracy.

· Lessons learnt by official Agencies in dealing disaster along with specific suggestion for improving procedure.

· Lessons Learnt : Elevating the status of Education in Rural (Tribal) areas.

Elevating the standard of living.

Every village must have 1-2 Bore-wells

(source of safe drinking water)

· Suggestions for Improving the status on above mentioned points.

· Preventive Measures taken in controlling the epidemic by the administrative Department:

1) Home to home survey were done with the help of M.P.W. workers.

2) Provided the adequate medicines to the persons which were found affected with the epidemic during the survey.

3) Provided medicines to other family members who lives with patients.

4) Regularly Chlorinisation of drinking water with the help of Local Panchayat.

5) Collecting the water samples for testing at District Public Health Laboratory.

6) Creating medical aids team at Taluka level under the guidance of District authorities.

7) To establish the controlling section to prevent the epidemic at District level, PHC level for 24 hours service.

8) To open the different aids centre at the affected villages and admitting the serious person to the centre and providing adequate medicines.

9) To sensitise the people about health education.


Episode 2

· Types of Episode: Gastro enteritis Epidemic

· Location: Wadsa (Urban); Only Urban in 1992-93; 577 Attacks; 7 Deaths

· Date: 14.6.91 to 24.6.92

· Reasons assigned: Contaminated drinking water.

· Warning Systems used: Stopping of drinking water from all other sources except identified chlorinated sources through Health workers, Gram sevaks, Anganwadi workers & teachers of Primary schools.

· Community response to Warning system: Effective

· Administrative response to Warning system: Effective

· Assessment of Administrative preparedness: Excellent

· Area Affected (number of village) : 1 Urban Town

· Extent of Damage: 7 Deaths

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Name of Department Type of Relief Expenditure

Compensation

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Health Deptt. Opening of Isolation centres Done by Municipal Council / PHC
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

· Organizational Structure evolved to manage the emergency : Health Department and other State Govt. Department like Revenue Deptt, Rural Development Department.

· Nature of support from the State and Central authorities.:

From State Government : Funds for medicine/equipment are received from State

Government and Zilla Parishad.

From Central Government - Nil.

· Methods used for mobilizing resources: NGO Community Response, Health Education to masses by Team of Doctors/Nurses/HA's

· Legal or Procedural bottlenecks experienced in managing the situation: Preventing Blind belief & superstition and to some extend illiteracy.

· Lessons learnt by official and communities in dealing disaster along with specific suggestion for improving procedure:

Lessons Learnt : Elevating the status of Education in Rural (Tribal) areas.

Elevating the standard of living.

Every village must have atleast one source of safe drinking water

Suggestions : Improving the status on above mentioned points.

Episode 3

· Types of Episode : Flood in 1992

· Location : Gadchiroli District

· Date : August 1992.

· Reasons assigned - Due to heavy rainfall. The level of Vainganga, for the event Gadhavi, Pamalgautam, Indravati rivers suddenly increased.

· Warning Systems used: 1) Wireless

2) Telephone

3) Beats of drum as per guide lines of revenue authority, municipal authority work the residents to leave the sites for safer sites.

· Community response to Warning system : Partly responded and aid was provided by N.G.O.s & Govt. Department in time.

· Administrative response to Warning system: Attended by revenue, Police and Municipal Council, Gram Panchayat and other Govt. Department promptly.

· Assessment of administrative preparedness: Timely warning & relief provided.

· Area Affected : 21 villages.

· Extent of Damage: As below.

· Number of lives lost: 2

· Crop Damage types of crops and area in acres : 362.2 Hectors Paddy, Approx. loss of Crop Rs. 44852.

· Damage to houses : 534 (21 fully + 513 partly)

· Loss of Cattle : 92 (49 Cattle + 43 Sheep & Goats)

· Damage to infrastructure : Damages to Agricultural Land, Agri. implements, household articles, Govt. & Public properties i.e. Road & Bridges, Electrical Lines, Telephone Lines, Water supply schemes, Building & other properties.

· Procedures followed for assessing various types of damages and the compensation norms used : As per Govt. instructions and compensation norms were prescribed by the Govt. vide revenue and forest departments order dated 13.9.83 and 14.10.94.

· Department wise break up of the expenditure incurred on relief and rehabilitation (immediate as well as long term) : A grant of fund placed by Govt. in R.and F.D. at the disposal of S.D.O. & Tahsildar of Gadchiroli District.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Name of Type of Relief/Compensation Expenditure

Department rehabilitation

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

S.D.O. & 1) Reconstruction of house 1,32,750/-

Tahsildar of 2) Seeds 44,832/-

Gadchiroli 3) Loan for cattle 1,17,200/-

District. 4) Food and Cloth 27,310/-

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

· Origanizational Structure evolved to manage the emergency- The Disaster Management Plan for flood of Gadchiroli District has been prepared and involvement of Revenue, Police, Irrigation, P.W.D., Telephone, Forest, M.S.E.B., Z.P., Agriculture Engineering, Home Guard, etc. is made there in to manage the emergency.

· Nature of support from State and Central Govts. : Reconstruction of house, providing seeds, cloths, food and loan for cattle.

From State Government - Financial Assistance

From Central Government - Warning system by the meteorological Deptt.

· Legal or Procedural bottlenecks experienced in managing the situation : No


Episode 5

· Types of Episode: Flood in 1994

· Location : Gadchiroli District

· Date : 11th & 12th July, 1994

· Reasons assigned : Due to heavy rainfall. The level of Vainganga, for the event Gadhavi, Pamalgautam, Indravati rivers suddenly increased and submerged low lying Agricultural & other lands.

· Warning Systems 1) Wireless used 2) Telephone  3) Beat of drum as per guide lines of revenue authority, municipal authority made the residents to leave and alerted the residents to shift to safer sites.

· Community response : Partly responded and aid was provided by N.G.O.s to Warning system & Govt. Department in time.

· Administrative : Attended by revenue, Police and Municipal response to Council, Gram Panchayat and other Govt. Warning system Department promptly.

· Assessment of : Timely warning & relief provided.

administrative

preparedness

· Area Affected : 34 villages.

· Extent of Damage : As below.

· Number of lives lost : 9.

· Crop Damage, types of crops and area in acres: 56951 Ha. of Paddy.

· Damage to houses : 1706

· Loss of Cattle: 823 + 400 = 1223 (823 cattle + 400 sheeps & goats)

· Damage to infrastructure : Damages to Agricultural Land, Agri. implements, household articles, Govt. & Public properties i.e. Road & Bridges, Electrical Lines, Telephone Lines, Water supply schemes, Building & other properties.

· Procedures followed : As per Govt. instructions and compensation norms for assessing various were prescribed by the Govt. vide revenue & types of damages & forest departments order dated 13.9.83 and the compensation 14.10.94.

norms used

· Department wise : A grant of fund placed by Govt. in R.N.F.D. at break up of the disposal of S.D.O. & Tahsildar of Gadchiroli expenditure District.

incurred on relief Expenditure details to as under. & rehabilitation

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Name of Type of Relief/Compensation Expenditure

Department rehabilitation

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

S.D.O. & 1) Cash, food, Grains, Clothing 94.72 Lakhs

Tahsildar of Temporary shelters

Gadchiroli 2) Land Acquisition 25.97 Lakhs

District. 3) Construction of Houses 13.25 Lakhs

4) Loans for Houses 0.07 Lakhs

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

· Organizational Structure : The Disaster Management Plan for flood of evolved to manage the Gadchiroli District has been prepared and emergency specify the involvement of Revenue, Police, key department involved. Irrigation, P.W.D., Telephone, Forest,  M.S.E.B., Z.P., Agriculture (Horticulture & Soil) N.G.O.'s, Environmental Engineering, Home Guard, etc. is made there in to manage the emergency.

· Nature of support from : Provided cash, food, grains, clothes, State and Central temporary shelters, reconstruction of authorities. house, loan for house and land acquisition.

From State Government : Financial Assistance

From Central Government : Warning system by the meteorological

Deptt.

· Methods used for : The warning of the flood was given in mobilizing resources NGO affected area promptly & relief provided Community Response. through Govt. & N.G.O.'s agency promptly.

· Legal or Procedural : No legal or procedural bottlenecks bottlenecks experienced experienced in managing the 1994 floods in managing the situation in Gadchiroli District.

· Methods used for : N.G.O.'s co-operation was sought for mobilizing resources NGO shifting & in providing assistance of Community Response. food, clothing & camping arrangements.

· NGO Community Response : The response was excellent.

· Legal or Procedural : No legal or procedural bottlenecks bottlenecks experienced experienced in managing the 1992 floods in managing the situation in Gadchiroli District.

Lessons learnt by officials and communities in dealing with disaster along with specific suggestions for improving procedures.

Lessons learnt : Flash floods come so suddenly that in spite of warning damage to lives and property cannot be fully averted. As such all villages habitations in blue and red zone need to be shifted to safer sites. In blue and red zone vacated areas Forest department may do afforestation to avoid fresh encroachments and constructions in danger zones.(Note : The list of red zone and blue zone villages is enclosed separately.)

Suggestions : It is suggested that the comprehensive action plan of District to control and over come the situation needs to be prepared & implemented be designed as master action plan for meeting any type of hazard. All the Departments of State and Central including State/Central undertakings which have the resources and specialised man power should be involved. Not only the Govt. But also specialised persons and experts should be included as members to give advice. In view of the rapid industrialisation major use of water on surface and vehicles the possibility of hazards is increased and Govt. should give priority to prepare the plan to save the lives and property. The masses should be educated how to act when there is any hazard. There should be regular Seminars, workshops to educate the masses and also regular publicity should be given through media of Doordarshan, All India Radio and Newspapers to have disaster awareness in the masses.

The building code Rules should be implemented both in urban and rural areas to ensure the standard construction of houses, which would sustain flood and earthquake hazards. Unauthorised construction in low lying areas within blue zone of the rivers need to be curbed. Blue zones need to be indentified and villages in blue zone should be shifted to safer sites by having a five year programme.


CAPABILITY ANALYSIS

Inventory and Evaluation of Resources

· · Inventory and evaluation of resources is necessary for assessing the capacity of the district to respond effectively to different types of disasters, and more specifically to the disaster that the district is specifically vulnerable to.

· · In case of Gadchiroli district, the capacity is judged primarily in terms of its ability to respond to an earthquake, fires and flood. During disaster, both governmental and non-governmental (including private) resources are planned to be mobilised. The list of resources available with the government and other agencies is given below. These will be updated from time to time.

Communication and Mass Media

Monitoring Predicting And Warning Systems

The following departments and technology is available for monitoring, predicting and warning about disasters in the district.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Disaster Monitoring stations Monitoring Warning Department/

Numbers & locations Instruments Systems & Agency

Technology

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Earthquake --- --- --- ---

Floods At catchment area Rainguage stations Warning by Irrigation Dept.& dam site, river at taluka headquart- Meterological Coll. Gadchiroli Brigdes, Road ers and monitoring & Weather & Meteorology

Brigdes rainguage instruments of Deptt. by Central Water

Stations Meteorological Collectors of Commission

Deptt. at Nagpur catchment area Nagpur

Pune central water based on rain-

commission flood fall waring also

monitoring system warnings.

Cyclones --- --- --- ---

Epidemics D.H.O. Office Epidemics are Health Deptt. Health Dept.

Main Hospitals handled by Health technology & of Gadchiroli & Rural Hospitals Department and preventive district.Civil information measures Deputy Surgeon, monitored by

Director of Health Gadchiroli.

phone D.H.O. Dean, Govt.

Medical College,

Indira Gandhi

Medical College.

Industrial One Security Net work of Intercom & Personnel/ & Chemical office located intercom within electronic siren security.

Accidents near gate. the mills and colony, P & Tcommunication.

Written guide line for

Fire prevention

Net work of fire hydrant system

as per drawing No. Sec/Bilt-

1041-003 (AE)(copy enclosed)

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Disaster Monitoring stations Monitoring Warning Department/

Numbers & locations Instruments Systems & Agency

Technology

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Fires In Industrial Telephone & By Telephone & Revenue, estate & Taluka Wireless Management by Police, information by fire brigade Muni. Admin is received on fire brigade phone or messenger through Revenue & Police.

Road Police Stations Telephone & Police & R.T.O. P.W.Dn. Accidents wireless messages Surveillance P.W. Police&RTO

Dn. warnings Surveillance

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Vigilance is maintained and timely warning is given in advance in the concerned area/locality by beat of drums and on radio & T.V. about the occurrence of disaster.

Mass Media

Apart from the technological support available, the mass media can be used for
delivering warning and alert messages to the community currently there are,

Number of local newspaper 33

Number of radio stations --

Number of TV transmission centres 02

Administrative Preparedness

Building Codes Implementation

· · Municipal Committees of Gadchiroli and Desaiganj follow their building bye - laws but strict implementation is not done for want of technical staff.

· · In rural areas the Gram Panchayats grant building permissions but they cannot enforce codes for want of Technical Staff.

Land Use Regulations and Zoning

· · Land Use Regulations and Zoning practices have been adopted while preparing detailed town planning schemes for municipal towns of Gadchiroli and Desaiganj.

· · The zoning takes care of flood prone areas as also of industrial locations to minimise risk to the population. However in the slum areas this zoning is not being strictly enforced.

· · No special planning for earthquake prone areas has been done.

· · In rural areas, there is no effective machinery for strictly enforcing land user regulations and zoning practices particularly in the case of flood prone areas.

Existing Emergency Plans

· · There is no multi-hazard response plan for the district.

· · Each hazardous industry has prepared an off-site hazard management plan.

Disaster Specific Capability Analysis

In Gadchiroli District the main Disaster is from Flood hazards. Normally Flood warning for floods in Rivers Wainganga,Pranhita,Wardha,Gadhavi,Kathani,Pamalgautam, Khobragadi are communicated to river site village through Revenue & Police Deptt. And warning through T.V. & Radio. However for rescue work there is shortage of mechanised and traditional local boats ,these items need to be supplied by Govt. as local bodies are nor having these facilities.

The fire brigades at Gadchiroli and Desaiganj are inadequate for large areas falling in Chamorshi,Aheri,Bhamragad and Sironcha Tahsils. Additional Fire brigade units need to be sanctioned under tribal sub-plan to Gram Panchayats of Aheri and Sironcha.

For epidemic control Health facilities are adequate.

For Earthquake prone house, technical training inadequate.

The following information will indicate that the State preparedness of the District machinery in terms of infrastructure and manpower is adequate to deal with each of the disaster.

Sr.No. Name of disaster Availability of infrastructure and Manpower to deal with the disaster

1

Flood & Cyclone

Distt. Control Room Taluka Control Room ,Wireless not work Revenue Police PWD Irrigation Health all Govt. Deptts. and  NGO’s Manpower and machinery is adequate to deal with the disaster.

2

Epidemics

Public Health Department Revenue Department Zilla Parishad Water Department C.S.Police NGO’s Private Hospitals are adequate with Medicines and other facilities like Doctor Nurses, Medical Staff ,Vehicles etc. to deal with epidemic.

3

Road Accidents

Police, R.T.O. Health they serious injured persons are normally shifted by Police to nearest Hospital in Rural and Urban areas. The Health Services to deal with road accidents by the district However very serious cases will have to be sent to Govt. Medical  College Nagpur.

Mobile training case unit on NH NOC needs to be placed at the disposal of  state Highway Police with an estimated expenditure of Rs. 10 Lac

4

Industrial and Chemical fires

The existing fire fighting capacity in the district available with the Nagar Parishad and Industries are inadequate . Hence the fire brigade at Gadchiroli and Wadsa need to be upgraded. One new fire brigade under forest Deptt. Needed at Aheri.

5

Ordinary fires

Existing fire brigades in the district inadequate fire brigades are needed in Sironcha and Aheri through Govt. funds with Gram Panchayats .

6

Earthquake

Since most of buildings in rural areas are constructed of mud and local material (Non engineering  Structures) are prone to earthquake disaster.  Earth moving machinery like JCB, excavators , cranes, dozers are inadequate earthquake and such machinery have to be moved from other district like Nagpur, Amravati, and Chandrapur.


Preparedness Measures undertaken by Departments

In addition to the administrative preparedness measures, the district control room will receive reports on preparedness from the relevant district level departments and other departments, as per the details given below. This will enable the District Collector to analyse the capabilities and preparedness measures of various departments and report on the same to the Emergency Operations Centre, Relief Commissioner and Divisional Commissioner.

Preparedness Checklist for Police (to be filled in by the Department Head and submitted to the District Collector every six months)

Preparedness measures taken

Details/Remarks

The  department is familiar with  disaster response plan and disaster response procedures are clearly defined

 

Orientation and training for disaster response plan and procedures  undertaken

Special skills required during emergency operations imparted to the officials and the staff.

 

Reviewed  and updated

·         ·        Precautionary measures and procedures

·         ·        the precautions to be taken to protect equipment 

·         ·        the post-disaster  procedures to be followed.

 

Adequate warning mechanisms established for evacuation

 

A officer has been designated as Nodal Officer for Disaster Management

 

Sources of materials required for response operations have been identified

 

Reported By :

Designation

Signature

Date

Preparedness Checklist for Public Health Department (to be filled in by the Civil Surgeon and District Health Officer and submitted to the DCR every six months)

Preparedness Measures taken

Details/ Remarks

The  department is familiar with  disaster response plan and disaster response procedures are clearly defined

 

A hospital plan for the facilities, equipment and staff of that particular hospital based on “The Guide to Health Management in Disasters” has been developed.

 

Orientation and training for disaster response plan and procedures undertaken

Special skills required during disaster situations  are imparted to the officials and the staff.

 

Hospital staff are aware of which hospital rooms/ buildings are damage-proof.

 

Reviewed  and updated

·         ·        precautionary measures and procedures

·         ·        the precautions that have  to be taken to protect equipment

·         ·        the post-disaster  procedures to be followed.

 

All hospitals’ staff have been informed about the possible disasters in the district, likely damages and effects,        and information about ways to protect life, equipment and property.

 

An area of the hospital identified for receiving large numbers of casualties.

 

Emergency admission procedures with adequate record keeping developed.

 

Field staff oriented about 

·         ·        DDMAP

·         ·        standards of services,

·         ·        procedures for   tagging.

 

A officer has been designated as Nodal Officer for Disaster Management

 

Sources of materials required for response operations have been identified

 

Reported By :

Designation Signature Date


Preparedness Checklist for MSEB
(to be filled in by the Department Head and submitted to the District Collector every six months)

Preparedness measures taken

Details/Remarks

The  department is familiar with disaster response plan and  disaster response procedures are clearly defined 

 

Orientation and training for disaster response plan and procedures  undertaken

Special skills required during emergency operations imparted to the officials and the staff.

 

Reviewed  and updated

·         ·        Precautionary measures and procedures

·         ·        the precautions to be taken to protect equipment 

·         ·        the post-disaster  procedures to be followed.

 

A officer has been designated as Nodal Officer for Disaster Management

 

Sources of materials required for response operations have been identified

 

Reported By :

Designation

Signature

Date

Preparedness Checklist for Maharashtra Jeevan Pradhikaran (to be filled in by the Department Head and submitted to the District Collector every six months)

Preparedness Measures Taken

Details/Remarks

The  department is familiar with  disaster response plan and disaster response procedures are clearly defined

 

Orientation and training for disaster response plan and procedures undertaken

Special skills required during emergency operations imparted to the officials and the staff.

 

Reviewed  and updated

·         ·        Precautionary measures and procedures

·         ·        the precautions to be taken to protect equipment 

·         ·        the post-disaster  procedures to be followed.

 

Adequate warning mechanisms for informing   people to store an emergency supply of drinking water have been developed.

 

Procedures established for the emergency distribution of water if existing supply is disrupted.

 

A officer has been designated as Nodal Officer for Disaster Management

 

Sources of materials required for response operations have been identified

 

Reported By :

Designation

Signature

Date

 


Preparedness Checklist for Irrigation Department
(to be filled in by the Department Head and submitted to the District Collector every six months)

Preparedness measures taken

Details/Remarks

The  department is familiar with  disaster response plan and disaster response procedures are clearly defined

 

Orientation and training for disaster response plan and procedures undertaken

Special skills required during emergency operations imparted to the officials and the staff.

 

Reviewed  and updated

·         ·        Precautionary measures and procedures

·         ·        the precautions to be taken to protect equipment 

·         ·        the post-disaster  procedures to be followed.

 

Flood monitoring mechanisms can be activated in all flood prone areas from 1st  of June.

 

All staff are well aware of precautions to be taken to protect their lives and personal property.

 

Each technical assistant has  instructions and knows operating procedures for disaster conditions.

 

Methods of monitoring and impounding the levels in the tanks evolved. 

Methods of alerting officers on other dam sites  and the district control room, established

Mechanisms evolved for

·         ·        forewarning  settlements in the downstream

·         ·        evacuation

·         ·        coordination with other dam authorities

 

A officer has been designated as Nodal Officer for Disaster Management

 

Sources of materials required for response operations have been identified

 

Reported By :

Designation

Signature

Date

Preparedness Checklist for Telecommunications (to be filled in by the Department Head and submitted to the District Collector every six months)

Preparedness measures taken

Details/Remarks

The  department is familiar with disaster response plan and  disaster response procedures are clearly defined 

 

Orientation and training for disaster response plan and procedures  undertaken

Special skills required during emergency operations imparted to the officials and the staff.

 

Reviewed  and updated

·         ·        Precautionary measures and procedures

·         ·        the precautions to be taken to protect equipment 

·         ·        the post-disaster  procedures to be followed.

 

A officer has been designated as Nodal Officer for Disaster Management

 

Sources of materials required for response operations have been identified

 

Reported By :

Designation

Signature

Date

 


Preparedness Checklist for PWD
(to be filled in by the Department Head and submitted to the District Collector every six months)

Preparedness Measures taken

Details/Remarks

The  department is familiar with  disaster response plan and disaster response procedures are clearly defined

 

Orientation and training for disaster response plan and procedures  undertaken

Special skills required during emergency operations imparted to the officials and the staff.

 

Reviewed  and updated

·         ·        Precautionary measures and procedures

·         ·        the precautions to be taken to protect equipment 

·         ·        the post-disaster  procedures to be followed.

 

All officers are familiar with pre-disaster  precautions and post-disaster procedures for road clearing and for defining safe evacuation routes where necessary.

 

A officer has been designated as Nodal Officer for Disaster Management

 

Sources of materials required for response operations have been identified

 

Reported By :

Designation

Signature

Date

Preparedness Checklist for Agriculture Department (to be filled in by the Department Head and submitted to the District Collector every six months)

Preparedness Measures taken

Details/Remarks

The  department is familiar with  disaster response plan and disaster response procedures are clearly defined

 

Orientation and training for disaster response plan and procedures  undertaken

Special skills required during emergency operations imparted to the officials and the staff.

 

Reviewed  and updated

·         ·        Precautionary measures and procedures

·         ·        the precautions to be taken to protect equipment 

·         ·        the post-disaster  procedures to be followed.

 

Information provided to all concerned  about the disasters, likely damages to crops and plantations,   and information about ways to protect the same.

 

The  NGOs and other relief organisations are informed about  the resources of the department

 

A officer has been designated as Nodal Officer for Disaster Management

 

Sources of materials required for response operations have been identified

 

Reported By :

Designation

Signature

Date


Preparedness Checklist for Animal Husbandry Department
(to be filled in by the Department Head and submitted to the District Collector every six months)

Preparedness measures taken

Details/Remarks

The  department is familiar with  disaster response plan and disaster response procedures are clearly defined

 

Orientation and training for disaster response plan and procedures undertaken

Special skills required during emergency operations imparted to the officials and the staff.

 

Reviewed  and updated

·         ·        Precautionary measures and procedures

·         ·        the precautions to be taken to protect equipment 

·         ·        the post-disaster  procedures to be followed.

 

Hospital staff are aware of which hospital rooms/ buildings are damage-proof.

 

All veterinary hospitals and centres’ staff have been informed about the possible disasters, likely damages and effects, and information about ways to protect life, equipment and property.

 

An  area of the hospital identified for receiving large numbers of livestock.

 

Emergency admission procedures with adequate record keeping developed.

 

A officer has been designated as Nodal Officer for Disaster Management

 

Sources of materials required for response operations have been identified

 

Reported By :

Designation

Signature

Date


Government And Private Sector Resources

Resource inventory consisting of manpower, transport, infrastructure and equipments for both private and public institutions including NGOs indicates the response capacity of the district. These have been given in the following tables. Keeping the specific vulnerability of the district to earthquakes and floods the information has been analysed.

Manpower

The number of NGOs working in the district : 5

Staff available with NGOs : 70

Significant CBOs : 2536

Private Hospitals : 10

Police Service personnel : 2310

Fire Brigde personnel : 9

Health Service personnel : 1303

Defence Service personnel : 350

Home Guards personnel : 650

Infrastructure

Number of towns with Fire Brigade Service : 2

Number of Private Hospitals with Surgery Facility : 7

Number of Public Hospitals with Surgery Facility : 11 (one with police)

Number of ambulances with private organisations : 2

Number of ambulances with public organisations : 16

Number of X-ray & Municipal Corporation machines : 3 with private

Number of X-ray machines with public institutions : 10

Number of blood banks with private institutions :

Number of blood banks with public institutions : 3

Number of beds with private hospitals : 90

Number of beds with public organisations : 1138

Public Hospitals : 1136

Home Guards : -

­Defence : --

Police : 2

Number of trauma care centres in private hospitals : 6

Number of trauma care centres in public hospitals : 85

Number of poison care centres in public hospitals : 102

Number of pathological labs with private organisations : 8

Number of pathological labs with public organisations : 11

Number of boats : 9

Technology Support

· · Satellite Communication link with Mantralaya via NIC available

· · Police Wireless communication accessible

· · Telephones available in all taluka headquarters

· · Fax machines available in all taluka headquarters


Special Equipment Available At The District Level

Gadchiroli district being prone to floods, fires and earthquakes certain special equipments will be required to manage these disasters.

In both these disaster, there can be extensive damage to infrastructure and housing. The resque operations requires earth moving equipments for removing for removing the debris and clearing the sites for resettlement.

­Specialised Equipment Numbers Department Organization

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Driling rigs 1 Sr.Geologist, G.S.D.A., Gadchiroli

Mobile Trauma care centres 2 Health Deptt. Rural Hospital, Aheri

Fire brigade 2 Municipal Corporation, Gadchiroli

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The resources have been assessed for capability (in the context of the magnitude of the task), availability (in terms of response time) and durability (that is, the capacity to sustain and continue), in relation to the disaster situation that may occur.

Adequacy Of Existing Inventory For Disaster Management

· · In order to equip the district for managing disasters effectively, it may be necessary to assess the adequacy of present resource inventory.

· · It is noticed that there a seismological observatory and two micro-earthquake recorders for earthquake monitoring.

· · Also in spite of the recurrence of floods in Godavari, Indravatil, Pranhita and Wainganga basins, there are no flood monitoring stations, but only 1 rainfall monitoring stations. Conventional as well as mass media is used as community warning systems for floods.

· · There are 5 NGOs, all working in more than five villages. The NGO support therefore may prove to be adequate during disasters particularly with regard to their capacity to scale up their operations.

· · Out of the 4 urban centres, only 2 towns have fire brigades indicating the inadequacy of the service. Considering that district produces peddy crops as one of the major crops and urban centres being essentially markets for agriculture produce, the present services in inadequate.

· · Although control room exists at the Collectorate, it needs upgradation as per the specified norms.

· · Repeated flood episodes and the possibilities of other disasters demands efforts from administration, private sector and NGOs to undertake community preparedness exercises. Presently, only flood related community preparedness measures are undertaken in which the NGOs are also involved. There is a need to identify disaster prone areas and develop a comprehensive community preparedness programme.

· · Based on these observations, the requirements of the district have been identified in mitigation section.

· · In all other aspects, the district seems to be well-prepared.

MITIGATION STRATEGY

Requirements of the District in Responding to the Possible

Disaster Events

· · Wireless should be available from district to taluka level. Special wireless sets should be installed at inaccessible but flood prone areas during the monsoon months.

· · Railway authorities monitoring flood levels in Rivers/Nalas should be equipped with communication facility such as telephone or wireless so that they can inform nearest Police station/Tahsildar and Collector of the down stream district about heavy rains/rise in flood even during night or evening. (At present warning is communicated after rainfall readings at 8.00 a.m. or 4.00 p.m.)

· · For example : Flood warning about Wainganga river be given by Collector of Balaghat District to Collectors of Bhandara, Nagpur, Chandrapur and Gadchiroli. Water levels in Wardha river by Collector of Betul District to Collectors of Nagpur, Wardha, Chandrapur and Gadchiroli. As far as rise in level of Godavari rivers is concerned, Collector of Jagadalpur district may issue warnings to Collector of Gadchiroli district. Collectors of Nagpur Division may similarly issue advance warnings to adjoining districts of Andhra Pradesh.

Mitigation Strategies suggested

Floods

· · Blue and red zone to be demarcated for all major rivers i.e. Kathani, Khobragadi, Pranhita, Pamal Gautam & Indravati areas very frequently affected by floods - every five years - Blue zone and 30 years affected - Red zone. High flood levels to be marked on pucca structures buildings in low lying areas of flood affected villages/Road and Railways bridges.

· · The Town Planning Department needs to be strengthened to assist rural local bodies i.e. Gram Panchayats for effective implementation of building and zoning regulations to avoid recurring losses of households in low lying flood prone area adjacent to rivers and nalas. More elaborate planning on watershed management schemes by Irrigation and Agriculture Departments is necessary in order to ensure that such schemes are directed specifically to control of floods as well.

· · Flood control measures i.e. more afforestation in catchment areas and on bank of rivers to be undertaken.

· · High flood levels to be marked on pucca structures buildings in low lying areas of flood affected villages/ Road and Railways bridges.

· · Railway flood monitoring units at railway bridges to relay information to Collectors and Tahsildars in case of sedden rise in flood level.

· · Where river banks are facing problem of soil erosion and bank cutting, remedial measures to be undertaken by Irrigation Department , after survey.

Epidemics

(i) Preventive measures of permanent nature :-

Medical Officers and staff attached to District Hospital Primary Health Centres, Rural Hospitals as also the staff of the Panchayat Samities and Gram Panchayats have to be always vigilant about the preventive measures against outbreak of epidemics like Gastro, cholera/ diaorrhia, flu, malaria, jaundice. Supply of safe and potable drinking water, ensuring sanitary conditions in villages/ towns, prompt disposal of garbage, timely vaccination and inoculation are very helpful in controlling epidemics.

Normally before the onset of monsoon in May and June and during rainy season in July,August and September, there is always more possibility of outbreak of common epidemics like gastro and jaundice. The following preventive/ mitigation measures are suggested :-

1. Epidemic Control Cells to start functioning 24 hours at District and Primary Health Centre levels from May to October.

2. During the sensitive monsoon months of June and July, epidemic related mass awakening drive need to be taken by organising training and preventive measures at District, primary Health centres towns & villages levels. Any occurrence of epidemic need to be dealt with very promptly and report should also be sent immediately.

3. Stool test :- Stool tests of the gastro, diaorrhia related cases (atleast 10%) should promptly be taken up always with a view to ascertain the cause and nature of disease/ epidemic.

4. Sources of water like wells, ponds, drinking water schemes need to be disinfected as per programme and check on water quality and testing for all villages/towns has to be tightly kept by ensuring the following three items :-

a) Water quality control to be timely and strict - Sample checks and follow up.

b) Water quality survey to be continuous.

c) Prompt and follow up information management procedure to be followed.

The defects noticed in piped water supply schemes should be attended to very promptly and repairs should be carried out speedily. The surroundings of water scheme, pipes, platforms need to be kept clean. Disinfection of water and vigilance on water quality to be 100% ensured. The sample drawing agencies and the testing agencies work needs to be watched 100% full proof.

Tests and precautions for water quality to be ensured right from sources of water to distribution points. The District Health Officer in rural areas and Corporation/ Municipal Health authorities in city/ towns to keep their field staff well equipped with testing kits and ensure continuous timely tests very particularly before and during monsoon months. Gram Panchayats to be trained for village water supply schemes in this regard and they should be held responsible through their secretaries for water quality testing and prompt and timely disinfection of sources of drinking water. Adequate stocks of TCL powder for 3 months time ( 33 % chorine percentage in powder) to be ensured for Municipal and Gram Panchayats. Daily O.T. tests should be ensured for checking chorine percentage in drinking water. Water supply and environment sanitation and cleanliness Committees be constituted village wise to assist Gram Panchayats. These Committees be given training in general sanitation and water quality tests by Medical Officers of Primary Health Centres and Extension Officers (Health) at suitable centres.

The following Action Plan if implemented in Rural areas and town will be helpful in preventing and controlling Epidemics :-

1. Epidemic Control room should be established in the office of the District Health Officer, Zilla Parishad for rural areas and in the office of the Health Department of Corporation/ Municipal cities/ towns. It should function 24 hours during sensitive months and during outbreak of any epidemic.

2. At Primary Health Centres’ level day-to-day action and review about epidemic control measures should be taken and health sub centres as also Primary health centres should keep the District Health Officer/ Civil Surgeon Office informed about daily position.

3. Report of outbreak of epidemic, control of epidemic and end of epidemic should be reported by all field primary health centres to D.H.O./ Civil Surgeon promptly.

4. Adequate stock of medicines required for epidemic should be kept in all Primary Health Centres and sub-centres. Medicine kits should be readily available for being sent to epidemic affected areas.

5. Medical teams fully equipped with medicine and kits should be always available to deal with emergency of epidemics any part of the district.

6. Water quality tests in affected villages/ areas to be intensified.

7. Each month water samples and bleaching powder samples from all villages should be sent for tests to labs and if defects are noticed, remedial action should be taken.

8. On receiving information of outbreak of epidemics or cases reported from any village Medical Officer, a team with medicines should visit the village immediately and also inform higher authorities of Zilla Parishad and Revenue Department.

9. Gram Panchayat Secretary, Gram Sewaks, G.P. Shipai should be well trained in water purification method by giving practical demonstration.

10. Drinking water being supplied by tankers should also be dinsinfected and should be of potable quality.

Similar precautions should be taken by the Health and Water Supply authorities in Corporation cities and Municipal town under the control of Municipal Commissioner and Chief Officers.

Other Mitigation Measures

· · Providing Highways with Danger signs; Implementation of earthquake building code in Rural Areas also.

· · Special Earthquake prone zone planning needs to be studied by the Town Planning Department for the district Building regulations in earthquake prone areas may be prescribed and training needs to be imparted to Municipal and Gram Panchayat staff in this type of planning.

INSTITUTIONAL ARRANGEMENTS AT THE DISTRICT LEVEL

Disaster management would involve many layers of participating organization. The three focal levels would be State, District and the site of the disaster. The State level agencies would be involved in policy decisions, resource allocation, prioritisation of activities and budget allocation and monitoring through the Emergency Operations Centre.

The District Disaster Management Committee (DDMC) is an apex planning body and will play a major role in preparedness and mitigation.

The district level response will be coordinated under the guidance of District Collector who will act as District Disaster Manager.

Responsibilities of Collector

The Collector shall be responsible for

preparation of the DDMAP with the assistance of the DDMC.

setting up District Control Room

encouraging formation of Mutual Aid and Response Groups (MARG)

Under the DDMAP, district level agencies would be responsible for directing field interventions through various agencies right from the stage of warning to relief and rehabilitation.

At the disaster site, specific tasks to manage the disaster will be performed.

Collector will be an integral part of the DCR.

Collector will be assisted by SOC.

· SOC will be headed by a Site Manager.

· Site Manager will coordinate the activities at various camp sites and affected areas.

· The Site Operations Centre will report to the District Control Room.

Collector will coordinate all the field responses. Field Responses include setting up Transit Camps, Relief Camps and Cattle Camps.

The desk arrangements provides for division of tasks, information gathering and record keeping and accountability of the desk officer to the DDM for specific functions. Each desk should have a Desk Officer assigned. The capacity of various desks to coordinate amongst themselves and with the units to be coordinated will ultimately decide the quality of response. Such a function of coordination would largely depend on the capacity to effectively keep a track on communications received and the decisions taken. Pro forma for “In and Out Messages and Register” are given in Annexure I.

Image

Disaster Management Committee

A Disaster Management Committee exists to assist the Collector in

reviewing the threat of disasters

vulnerability of the district to such disasters

evaluating the preparedness and

considering suggestions for improvement of the response document DDMAP.

The Committee meets once a year under the chairmanship of the Collector and consists of the following functionaries

The Collector                                                                         

Chairman

The District Superintendent of Police

Member

The Chief Executive Officer, Zilla Parishad

Member

The Additional Collector

Member

The Resident District  Collector                                            

Member-Secy

The Commissioner of Police (if any)

Member

The Chief Fire Officer

Member

The District Health Officer

Member

The District Agriculture Officer

Member

The District Animal Husbandry Officer

Member

The Civil Surgeon

Member

The Executive Engineer, P. W. Department

Member

The Executive Engineer, Irrigation Department

Member

The Executive Engineer, Minor Irrigation Division

Member

The Executive Engineer, M.S.E.B.

Member

The Executive Engineer, MWSSB

Member

The Deputy Director of Education

Member

The Divisional Manager, Railways

Member

The Regional Transport Officer

Member

The Regional Manager, M.S.R.T.C.

Member

The District Publicity Officer

Member

The District Supply Officer

Member

The Local Station Director, A.I.R.

Member

The Local Station Director, Doordarshan

Member

The District Commandant, Home Guards

Member

The Divisional Forests Officer

Member

Sub-Divisional Officer(s)

Member

The Local Assistant Engineer, P. and T. Department

Member

The  Defence Units.

Member

District Level NGOs representative

Members

MARG representatives

Members


District Control Room

The District Control Room, under the control of the district collector, will be the nerve centre

to monitor

co-ordinate and

implement the actions for disaster management.

In a disaster situation the District Collector is the central authority exercising emergency powers to issue directives to all departments to provide emergency response service.

Normal Time Activity

The normal time activity of the Disaster Manager is to

ensure that all warning and communication systems, instruments are in working condition.

receive information on a routine basis from the district departments on the vulnerability of the various talukas and villages to disasters

the Disaster Manager will receive reports on preparedness from the relevant district level departments and other departments, as per information details. These will be forwarded to the Emergency Operations Centre, Relief Commissioner and Divisional Commissioner.

Upgrade and update DDMAP according to changing scenarios in the district

Update data bank and maintain an inventory of resources as per Table 1.

Inform Emergency Operations Centre (EOC) and YASHADA of any changes including updating of data bank and annexures

Monitor preparedness measures, training activities including simulation exercises undertaken by various departments

Ensure proper dissemination of DDMAP at the district level, local level and disaster prone areas

Encourage formation of MARG in industrial areas.

Organise post-disaster evaluation and update DDMAP accordingly

Prepare reports and documents on district level disaster events and submit the same to EOC. The document should include

Ø source and cause of the disaster,

Ø description of the response effort,

Ø recommendations for preventive and mitigation measures,

Ø plans for upgrading emergency preparedness and response plans.

Table I

Inventory of resources, materials and equipment accessible to DCR

(to be updated by District Control Room every six months and sent to Emergency Operations Centre)

Material/equipment

Departments/Agencies available with

Normal stock/quantity /amount

AC-sheets

PWD, Irrigation Deptt.

500 Sheets

Ambulances

DHO, Civil Surgeon, Municipal Council.

2,3,14

Asbestos sheets

PWD, Irrigation.

500

Bamboo mats

Open market at Wadsa and Nagpur

1000 Bamboos

Blankets and durries

With cloth wholesalers at Nagpur

5000

Blood

Govt.

3

Boats/Rescue Boats

Police

2

Bullies

Forest Department at Gadchiroli , Allapalli

5000

Buses

State transport, Private.

45,19

Cattle-feed (Pre-mix)

Available in Market

10 Tonnes

Construction equipment

Available with civil contractor of PWD

Adequate

Cooked food

Can be arranged through Hotel Halwai Assn.

5000 persons

Cooking vessels for use in relief camps

Are available with Bichhayat Kendra and Ashram School Hostels.

5000 persons

Cranes

Nil , available at Nagpur and Chandrapur.

 

Drivers

Govt. Deptt., Private

10, 50

Drilling rigs

Govt. GSDA , Private.

2, 3

Earth moving equipment

Govt., Private

1,2

Firewood

D.F.O. , Private timber merchant

Adequate

Generators

Police , Collector, P.W.D.

20,2,1

GI-pipes

Private

Adequate

GI-sheets

Private

Adequate

Ham sets

Nil

Nil

Helicopter service

Nil

Nil

Jeeps

Govt., Private

115,2475

Mobile trauma care vans

Police Deptt.

Mobile Gypsy

Mobile X-Ray units

Nil

Nil

Public address systems

Police Deptt.

Adequate

Pumps – diesel

              electric  

              hand pumps

Private Dealers

Adequately available in Gadchiroli and Nagpur on Payment.

Self breathing apparatus

Civil Hospital

2

Sign boards

With Private dealers

Adequate

Sniffer dogs

Police Deptt.

1

Tagging slips

Civil Hospital, D.H.O.

Available

Tankers

Govt., Private

5,12

Telephone instruments

Govt.

105

Tents

Police

10

Taxi gas masks

Industries

Nil

Tractor

Govt., Private

11, 95

Trucks

Govt., Private

25, 32

VHF sets with batteries

Irritation and Police

1, 260

Wireless sets

Police

50


Warning or Occurrence of Disaster


On the basis of reports from the possible disaster site, or on warning from agencies competent to issue such a warning, or on the receipt of warning or alert from Emergency Operations Centre, the Collector will exercise the powers and responsibilities of the District Disaster Manager.

It is assumed that the district administration would be one of the key organisations for issuing warnings and alerts. Additionally, the list of agencies competent for issuing warning or alert is given below:

Disaster Agencies

Earthquakes IMD, MERI,

Floods Meteorology Department, Irrigation Department

Cyclones IMD

Epidemics Public Health Department

Road Accidents Police

Industrial and Chemical Accidents Industry, MARG, Police, Fires Fire Brigade, Police

The warning or occurrence of disaster will be communicated to

Chief Secretary, Relief Commissioner, Emergency Operations Centre,

Office of Divisional Commissioner

All district level officials, Municipal Councils, MARG

The officials of central government located within the district

Non-officials namely, Guardian Minister of the district, Mayor, ZP President, MPs and MLAs from the district or affected area

Local units of the Defence Services

On the receipt of warning, all community preparedness measures and counter-disaster measures would come into operation. Further, the occurrence f the disaster would essentially bring into force the following :

The District Collector will activate the District Control Room as the District Disaster Manager.

The DCR will be expanded to include desk arrangements with responsibilities for specific tasks.

All district level staff from various departments will be under the direction and control of the District Disaster Manager. These would also include the district level staff of

Ø Zilla Parishad

Ø Municipal Authorities

Ø MSEB

Ø MWSSB

Ø PWD

Ø MSRTC

Ø Irrigation

Ø District Industries Centre

Ø Telecommunications.

Leave of all officers and staff working with the above organisations, as requisitioned by the District Disaster Manager, would automatically stand cancelled and the organisations would direct their staff to report on duty immediately.

The Relief Commissioner is the controlling authority in respect of Grants under “2245-Relief on account of Natural Calamities and also Loans and Advances”. He shall, therefore, ensure that adequate grants are placed at the disposal of the Collector under these budget head and that implementation of relief and rehabilitation measures is not hampered on account of paucity of funds or otherwise.

The District Disaster Manager may in case of large-scale disasters get in touch with the local Defence units for assistance for rescue, evacuation and emergency relief measures.

The District Disaster Manager will have the authority to requisition resources, materials and equipments from private sector.

The District Disaster Manager will have power to direct the industry to activate their on-site or off-site disaster management plan and seek assistance from MARG, if required.

The District Disaster Manager will set-up Site Operations Centre/s in the affected area with desk arrangements

The District Disaster Manager will authorise establishment of transit and/or relief camps, feeding centres and cattle camps.

An on-going wireless communication and contact from the DCR to the Site Operations Centres, Transit Camps, Feeding Centres, Relief Camps and Cattle Camps will be activated.

The District Disaster Manager will send the Preliminary Information Report and Action Taken Report, as per the available information, to the Chief Secretary/Relief Commissioner/Emergency Operations Centre and the Divisional Commissioner.

The District Disaster Manager will authorise immediate evacuation whenever necessary

In the event of possibilities of disasters in adjoining districts, including those beyond the state borders, the District Disaster Manager will issue the alert warning to them.

In multi-district disasters, if Additional Relief Commissioner is appointed at the multi-district level, the District Disaster Manager will report to the Additional Relief Commissioner.

In the absence of Collector, Additional Collector or Assistant Collector or Resident Deputy Collector will officiate and exercise all the powers and responsibilities of the District Disaster Manager listed above.

 


Desk Arrangements in District Control Room

District Disaster Manager

Establishing Priorities

Direct and coordinate the services of

Ø Defence Services, SRP, CRPF, Home Guards, Coast Guards, CISF

Ø Fire Brigade, Civil Defence

Ø DOT, Railways, AAI, Port Trust, FCI,

Ø DD, AIR

Ø MSEB, MWSSB, MSRTC, PWD

Ø Meteorological Department, MERI, MPCB,

Ø State Government Aircrafts and Helicopters

Coordinate with NGOs, and aid agencies

Enlist services of GOI/GOM laboratories and expert institutions for specialised services

Desk Assignments

Functions

Operations Desk

Resident Dy.Collector

Gadchiroli.

Ph.No. 22322 (o)

            22318 (R)

A.  Response Action for

 

v           Rescue and evacuation

 

v          Emergency transport for the seriously injured at the earliest possible time

 

v           Emergency supplies of water and cooked food

 

v           Salvage Operations

 

v           Disposal of dead

 

v           Transfer of marooned persons to transit camps at the earliest possible time

 

v           Within shortest possible time  for  marooned persons, water, medicines, first-aid, cooked food

 

v           Transit camps (in accordance with standards laid down) to be set-up at the earliest

 

v           Food Distribution Centres (in accordance to the Checklist) to be set-up at the earliest

 

B. Implement  procurement/purchase/hire/requisition plans    of materials  available at the district level. 

 

C. Establishing communication links

 

v           EOC

 

v           Office of Divisional Commissioner

 

v           Police, Railways, Fire Brigade, Defence Services, Civil Defence,  FCI, CISF, CPWD, PWD, MSEB, Irrigation, MWSSB, RTO, MPCB, IMD, and Inter-departmental relief activities within the district.

 

v           Mutual Aid and Response Group

 

v           NGOs and NGO coordinating committee

 

v           Private donors

 

 

  

D.  Reporting

 

v           Dispatch of Preliminary Information Report and Action Taken Report to Emergency Operations Centre and  Divisional Commissioner.

v           Dispatch of all  information and any other as asked for by  Emergency Operations Centre and  Divisional Commissioner.

v           Report to Emergency Operations Centre and  Divisional Commissioner on deployment and reinforcements of staff and resources.

v           Identify specific items for follow-up actions on the directives of the District Disaster Manager

 

E. Supervision and Monitoring of disaster management and relief activities within the district

 

F. Market Intervention

 

v           Promote and encourage revitalisation of local economic activities for speedy recovery

v           Prevent hoarding, price hiking and corruption and unauthorised sale of relief materials

v           Initiate  legal action on those engaged in  hoarding, price hiking, corruption and unauthorised sale of relief materials

 

G. General

 

v           Disseminate details about legal and official procedures, eligibility criteria with respect to relief and compensation for loss of life, injuries, livestock, crop, houses,  required to be adopted, as received from EOC

v           Maintenance of records (date of joining, period of service, leave record, overtime, etc) for all the persons deployed for relief work within the district

v           Obtaining orders, instructions, clearances, clarifications from state and divisional headquarters

v           Ensure implementation of orders, instructions,  from EOC and divisional headquarters at the disaster site.

v           Requisition of accommodation, structure, vehicles and equipments for relief duty

v           Issue of passes and identification stickers for vehicles on relief duty

v           Issue of passes and identity cards to relief personnel including the persons from NGOs

v           Sanctioning expenses for reimbursement with the approval of the District Disaster Manager (DDM).




Services Desk

Resident Dy.Collector

Gadchiroli.

Ph.No. 22322  (O)

            22318  (R)

A. A. Assess

 

v      v     Search and rescue requirements as per information

v      v     Relief requirements as per information

 

B. Organise and coordinate

 

v      v     Relief camps (in accordance with standards laid down) to be set-up

v      v     Arrangements for dry rations and family kits for cooking

v      v     Cattle camps

v      v     Relief supplies to Transit and Relief camps or to  Site Operations Centre.

v      v     Supplies  of fodder and cattle-feed to cattle camps

v      v     Supply of seeds, agriculture inputs and services to Site Operations Centre.

v      v     Welfare Services

v      v     law and  order  (e.g., prevent looting and theft)

 

C. Coordinate NGO activities through necessary support to ensure community participation

 

v           Establishing coordination mechanisms among district level NGOs and other state level NGOs such as Indian Red Cross, Ramkrishna Mission, Bharat Sevashram,  Swami Narayan Trust, Bharatiya Jain Sanghatna,  OXFAM, CARE, CASA, CARITAS

 

v           identification of NGOs to serve on committees,  task force

 

v           assign  well-defined  area of operations and report to EOC

 

v           assigning specific response functions to specialised NGOs and report to EOC

 

v           reporting upon procurement and disbursement of relief materials received through government and non-government channels

 

v           Mobilise and coordinate work of volunteers ensuring  community participation

 

 

Infrastructure  Desk

Executive Engineer  PWD Division No I Gadchiroli.

A. Organise and coordinate clearance of  debris

 

B. Temporary Repairs to  damaged infrastructure

 

v           power

v           water

v           transport

v           telecommunication

v           roads

v           bridges

v           canals

v           public buildings

 

C. Construction of Facilities

 

v           shelters with sanitation and recreation facilities

v           provision of hand-pumps and borewells

v           temporary structures for storage

v           educational facilities

v           medical facilities

v           postal facility

v           helipads

 

 



Health Desk

Civil Surgeon, Gadchiroli.

A. Organise  and maintain records on

 

v           treatment of the injured and sick

v           preventive medicine and anti-epidemic actions

v           disposal of dead bodies

v           disposal of carcasses

v           Reports  on  food, water supplies, sanitation and disposal   of waste

 

B. Assess, supply and supervise

 

v           Medical relief for the injured

v           Number of ambulances required and hospitals where they could be sent, (public and private);

v           Medical equipment and medicines required

v           special information required regarding treatment as for epidemics etc.

 

C. Supervision of maintenance of standards

 

v           Identification of source for supply of drinking water through tankers and other means of transport

v           transit and relief camps for cooking arrangements, sanitation, water supply, disposal of waste, water stagnation and health services.

v           Communities for storage of rations, sanitation, water supply, disposal of waste, water stagnation and health services.

v           standards in cattle camps with arrangements for water, fodder, disposal of solid waste, veterinary services

 

 

Logistics Desk

District Supply Officer Gadchiroli .

A. General

 

v      v     Assessment of  reinforcement needs including manpower and deployment of resources  as per information (formats given)

v      v     Requirement, availability and location of depots, and transportation of wood to the locations for mass cremation

v      v     Identification of location where mass cremation/burial can be carried out and Manpower and transport that would be required for this work;

v      v     Identification of location where carcasses can be disposed of  and Manpower and transport that would be required for this work;

v      v     Requesting for additional resources from other districts/divisional headquarters/EOC.

v      v     Arrangements with petrol pumps for supply of fuel for authorised relief vehicles against credit coupons

v      v     Coordinating and supervising issuing of  Village relief tickets to affected families

v      v     Ensuring safe storage, and transport of relief Supplies

v      v     Coordinate supplies distributed directly by NGOs and other organisations including private donors

v      v     Ensure proper maintenance of vehicles and equipment

 

B. Coordination of  Transport with

 

v      v     railways

v      v     MSRTC

v      v     Private transporters

v      v     Boat Operators

v      v     State Government Aircrafts

v      v     State Government Helicopters

 

C. Organising Transport for

 

v      v     Rescue parties

v      v     Relief Personnel

v      v     Marooned persons

v      v     Water, medicines, first aid and  cooked food for marooned persons

v      v     Volunteers

v      v     Relief Materials

v      v     Seriously injured and Sick

 

 

 



Agriculture Desk

Agriculture Development Officer, Gadchiroli.

Organise and coordinate

 

v      v     Rehabilitation of  agricultural production

v      v     Ensuring  interim crop production through supply of seeds and other inputs

v      v     Services of extension staff

Communication and Information Management Desk .

Resident Dy. Collector Gadchiroli

 

A. Set-up  an information centre in DCR to organise sharing of information with mass media and  community

 

B. Monitor disaster warnings and weather conditions in coordination with and on the advise of

 

v      v     IMD,  Irrigation, MERI, Industries

 

C.  C. General

 

v      v     Send Out-Messages on behalf of DDM

v      v     Maintaining  In-Message, Out-Message Register

v      v     Collect information from Site Operations Centre

v      v     Organise  information for  EOC and information on demand from Divisional Commissioner/EOC.

v      v     Serve as data bank required for managing operational aspects of disaster situations

 

D. Keep  readily available all the information contained in DDMAP, including

 

v      v     Office and residence telephone numbers, fax numbers, and mobile numbers where applicable of Chief Secretary and other Secretaries including Divisional Commissioner

v      v     Phone numbers, names, addresses and pager numbers where applicable of the officers and staff of the district and Emergency Operations Centre

v      v     List of people  on the spot who can organise and co-ordinate the relief activities,

v      v     Phone numbers, fax numbers, wireless, etc. of the other control rooms;

v      v     Phone numbers, names, and addresses of the field officers

v      v     Phone numbers, names, and addresses Non-officials (like MPs, MLAS, and Corporators) in the District

v      v     Planning Information required including maps incorporated in DDMAP 

v      v     Disaster Site Map and indications on  extent to which other areas may be affected, etc. 

v      v     Information regarding alternate routes, water sources, layout of essential services which may be affected, etc.


Resources  Desk

Account Officer, Collectorate

Gadchiroli.

A. Maintenance of

 

v      v     Books of account for all cash receipts according to source of funding

v      v     Books of accounts for all cash disbursements according to source of funding

v      v     Stock register for all relief materials

v      v     Issue register for all relief materials

v      v     Dead stock register for all non-consumables (inventory)

v      v     Record of all personnel payment on TA&DA, daily wages and other incidentals made to relief personnel.

v      v     Records of all  expenses incurred on administration and disaster management.

v      v     Records of all transfer of funds (as advances) to other government departments (suspense account)

v      v     Records  of all cash vouchers and credit vouchers

v      v     Records of all gratuitous relief

v      v     Records of all compensation paid

v      v     Preparation of records relating to finance and accounts as per the formats for dispatch to Emergency Operations Centre

 

B. Issuing of receipts for

 

v      v     All cash receipts

v      v     All materials receipt

 

C. General

 

v      v     All payments of  approved expenses, dues, claims, daily wages

v      v     Reimbursement of expenses approved by administration

v      v     Issue of cash vouchers and credit vouchers for petrol and diesel


Role of Divisional Commissioner

On the occurrence of disaster, the Divisional Commissioner will

Provide for reinforcement of resources from other districts within the division

Keep in constant touch with Chief Secretary, Relief Commissioner, Emergency Operations Centre

Site Operations Centre and Relief Camps

Planning Assumptions

A small scale disaster can be managed through Collector’s office without comprehensive desk arrangements at the DCR.

A Disaster affecting

· · a number of villages

· · doing considerable damage to housing

· · spread geographically over a large area and different locations

Þ Þ creates problems of management and logistics

Þ Þ Decentralisation of relief activities will improve the efficiency of DCR. This will require organisation of desk arrangements at the camp sites.

Þ Þ Site Operations Centre and location of Relief Camps will ensure effective decentralisations and organisation of relief activities.

Site Operations Centre

Depending on the nature of disaster and the type of damage, it may be necessary to set-up a number of relief camps and/or cattle camps.

· · In such a situation, the DDM may decide to set-up a Site Operations Centre to reduce the pressure on DCR for field coordination.

· · Depending on the disaster locations and the number of camp sites, the DDM may decide to set-up more than one Site Operations Centre.

· · The Site Operation Centre and the camps would be wound up after the relief and rehabilitation work is called off or after the relief camps and cattle camps are dismantled whichever is later.

· · The activities for the Site Operations Centre are given in Table III.

· · The Site Operations Centre will be managed by Site Manager of the rank of Sub-Divisional Officer/Deputy Collector.

It may be noted that a coordinating structure of this type may have many areas of overlap with the DCR and therefore the activities need not be duplicated. The basic functions of the Site Operations Centre will be to facilitate communication and coordination between DCR and the camp sites. A skeleton structure as given in Table II should be able to perform these tasks.


Relief Camps

Relief Camps would be set-up preferably on settlement lines and unless the disaster is a localised phenomenon, the DDM may decide to set-up as many camps as the number of villages affected. Also the size of the camp will be one of the considerations particularly in urban areas to decide on the number. The administrative structure for such relief camps responsible for direct service to “victims” is given in Table III. Each relief camp will be assigned to a Camp Officer, of the rank of Tahsildar. In some of the disasters, it may be necessary to set-up Feeding centres only for the victims.

The DDM may agree to assign some such relief camps or feeding centres to willing non-governmental organisations (NGOs) with demonstrated capability and required manpower. However, such camps would also come under coordinating mechanisms established through Site Operations Centre/s or DCR.

Table II

Site Operations Centre

(at a convenient location from the disaster site for coordinating site operations)

Activities

A.  Response Action for

 

v      v     Rescue and evacuation

v      v     Salvage Operations

v      v     Disposal of dead

v      v     Transit camps (in accordance with standards laid down)

v      v     Feeding Centres (in accordance to the Checklist) for  two weeks to be set-up at the earliest

v      v     Emergency supplies of water and cooked food

 

B.  B. Communication  with

 

v      v     Emergency Operations Centre

v      v     District control room

v      v     District administration staff in the area

v      v     Camp Officer for transit camps, relief camps and cattle camps.

v      v     NGOs and NGO coordinating committee

 

 

 C. Communicate to DCR

 

v      v     Search and rescue requirements

v      v     Resource requirements

v      v     Cash Compensation

v      v     Receive, store, secure, transport, relief materials for transit, relief and cattle camps, and affected villages.

v      v     All information  and subsequent demands to district control room

 

D. Organise

 

v      v     Preventive medicine and anti-epidemic actions

v      v     Inspection of  food, water supplies, sanitation and disposal of waste

 

 

Table III

Relief Camps (Components)

(at a convenient location from the disaster site for relief )

Desk Assignments

Functions

Operations  Desk

A.  Undertake Response Action for

 

v      v     Salvage Operations

v      v     Feeding Centres  for  two weeks to be set-up at the earliest

 

 B. Coordination with

 

v      v     Site Operations Centre

v      v     District Control Room

v      v     District administration staff in the area

v      v     NGOs

v      v     Private donors

 

C. Manage

 

v      v     Dispatch of all information (as per the formats) and subsequent demands to DCR/Site Operations Centre

v      v     Organise shifts for staff and Supervision of the same

 

D. General

 

v      v     Maintenance of  records (date of joining, period of service, leave record, overtime, etc) for all the persons deployed for relief work at operations centre

v      v     Get sanction for expenses for reimbursement from the DDM through Site Operations Centre.

 

 



Services Desk

 A. Assess

4.1.1      

v      v     Resource requirements

 

. B. Organise

 

v      v     Arrangements for dry rations and family kits for cooking within two weeks of the disaster

v      v     Relief supplies to families or to  households including water, clothing, and food

 

C. Provide Welfare services

 

v      v     Restoration of family (including locating  missing children, relatives, friends) 

v      v     Assistance in locating missing cattle

v      v     Assisting students to continue with their studies

v      v     Services for the orphans

v      v     Assisting individuals with special needs (pregnant women, infants, handicapped, old, widows etc)

v      v     Counselling services

v      v     Promotive services for mental health

 

 

 



Infrastructure  Desk

A. Clear debris

 

B. Mobilise community participation and coordinate building of 

 

v      v     shelters for affected people with  sanitation facilities

v      v     temporary structures for storage

v      v     Kitchens

v      v     medical facilities

v      v     education facility

v      v     recreational facility

v      v     postal facility

v      v     temporary Repairs to  damaged infrastructure

 

 

 

Health Desk

A. Organise

 

v      v     disposal of dead bodies

v      v     disposal of carcasses

v      v     disposal of waste and waste water

v      v     Treatment of the injured and sick

v      v     Preventive medicine and anti-epidemic actions

v      v     Inspection of  food, water supplies, sanitation and disposal of waste

 

4.1.2      

Logistics Desk

v      v     Issue Village relief tickets to affected families

v      v     Organise distribution of Relief Supplies

v      v     Receive, store, secure,  relief materials for relief camps, and affected villages.

v      v     Coordinate supplies distributed directly by NGOs and other organisations including private donors

v      v     Ensure proper maintenance of vehicles and equipment

v      v     Ensure optimum utilisation of resources such as fuel, food, and other relief materials

v      v     Mobilise and coordinate work of volunteers ensuring  community participation

v      v     Organise facilities for staff and volunteers

 

 

 



Communication and Information Management Desk

Collect and dispatch following information to Site Operations Centre

 

v      v     Data collection

v      v     Record keeping

v      v     Assistance in locating missing persons

v      v     Information Centre

v      v     Organisation  of information for Site Operations Centre  and on specific demands.

v      v     Maintaining In-Message and Out-Message Register

v      v     Sending all Out-Messages on behalf of Camp Officer of Relief Camp.

 

Resources Desk

A. Maintenance of

 

v      v     Books of account for all cash receipts 

v      v     Books of accounts for all cash disbursements

v      v     Stock register for all relief materials

v      v     Issue register for all relief materials

v      v     Dead stock register for all non-consumables (inventory)

v      v     Record of all personnel payment for daily wages and other incidentals made to relief personnel.

v      v     Records of all  expenses incurred on administration and disaster management at relief camp.

v      v     Records of all gratuitous relief

v      v     Records of all compensation paid

v      v     Preparation of records relating to finance and accounts as per the formats for dispatch to Site Operations Centre

 

B. General

 

v      v     All cash donations must be deposited with District Control Room and a receipt for the same obtained

v      v     All material donations must be entered in stock register  and made available for inspection to officer from the District Control Room or Site Operations Centre

v      v     Maintain record of all issue of cash vouchers and credit vouchers for petrol and diesel

 

4.1.3      

 

Facilities/Amenities Provided in the DCR

Planning Assumption

The Collector’s office has an adjoining Meeting Room, which can accommodate approximately 30-40 people. Hence, this will be used as a Conference Room.

The Communication Room is located next to the Collector’s office

Layout

The DCR has

adequate space for a large workstation

various desk arrangements during disaster situations.

The DCR is equipped with

necessary furniture and storewells for keeping

Ø Ø files of messages

Ø Ø stationery

Ø Ø other office equipment.

Action Plans including sub-plans and local plans

Vulnerability Maps

List of key contact persons

[Are easily accessible with clear labels, and not kept under lock and key].

Important phone numbers which are frequently required are displayed on the wall so that they can be seen easily, while other phone numbers, names and addresses etc., are also maintained on the computer to facilitate easy retrieval and cross-referencing..

Provision is made for

first-aid and other basic medical relief for the staff

a rest room with adequate facilities and

a lunch room

[This is required especially during disaster when staff may have to be on duty for long hours at a stretch].

Communication Room (Main Message Room)

[The existing police wireless system continues to be in contact with the reorganised DCR].

In addition, the following facilities are available in the communication room

Telephones

Fax

Intercom units for contact within the Collectorate

VSAT connection to the Divisional Commissioner and EOC in Mantralaya

Civil Wireless Network upto Tahsildar level

One PC with modem and printer

Mechanical typewriter

Mobiles and Pagers (where available and necessary)

Photocopying machine

During disaster, hotlines from communication room to be connected to

Ø Ø Divisional Commissioner

Ø Ø EOC at Mantralaya

Ø Ø Superintendent of Police of the district

Ø Ø Civil Surgeon of the district

Ø Ø Site Operations Centre

Separate tables are provided for each communication instruments such as

VSAT

telephones

fax

computer

printer

typewriter

wireless

The phones, i.e. intercom, STD phone, EPBX extension, hotline etc., are of different colours, and with distinct rings if possible, to enable them to be distinguished from each other. An emergency light, fire extinguishers, and a generator for the computer and fax machine are also provided in the communication room.

Desk Requirements

Each of the desks have

an independent phone with STD facility

intercom units for contact within the Collectorate for all Desk Officers in DCR and Officers-in-charge from line departments and other agencies at the district level

hotline for all Officers-in-charge to be connected to their respective agencies/departments.

Office space for secretarial facility has to be clearly demarcated.

[These telephones with STD facilities will be installed in DCR and kept in working condition under lock and key during normal circumstances].

Transport

Provision is made for a jeep with wireless communication assigned to DCR during normal times. Additional vehicles will be requisitioned as per the requirements during the emergency.

Staffing requirements for DCR

Three categories of staff are suggested for the DCR: Regular Staff for Communication Room, Staff -on-call and Staff on Disaster Duty.

Regular Staff

The regular staff will be posted permanently in the DCR which will be responsible for manning the Communication Room on a 24-hour basis.

The regular staff would include the following:

Desk Officer - Communication Room

A Deputy Collector from the Collectorate will function as the Desk Officer - Communication Room. He will be in charge of the day-to-day operation of the Communication Room during official working hours. He will be assisted by officers of the rank of Naib Tahsildars and Awal Karkuns from the Collectorate in rotation during non-working hours.

Communication Room Assistant

The person holding this position will be the key person of the DCR and will be of the rank of an Awal Karkun. He will always be physically present in the Communication Room. He will be responsible for processing all messages and information received and maintained by the Communication Room and communicating the same to the Desk Officer and Collector.

Stenographer

The person holding this position will provide all secretarial assistance to the Communication Room. The person should be computer literate and should be able to operate database systems.

Communication operators (for 24 hours)

The communication operator will attend to wireless set as well as the VSAT connection in the Communication Room.

Driver cum Messenger/Attendant (for 24 hours)

Drivers will be required for the vehicle attached to the DCR and kept on stand-by duty. These drivers should also be trained to operate the wireless fitted in the vehicle attached to the DCR.

Staff-on-call

Staff-on-call will be available for immediate duty in case of a disaster.

Two Deputy Collectors will make up the Staff -on-call. During a disaster, these officers will always be available "on call".

The staff-on-call will be appointed in rotation from some identified departments. The rotation period could be of at least a month, to ensure some degree of continuity.

Staff on Disaster Duty

Staff on Disaster Duty will be required to shoulder additional responsibility in the case of a disaster. This, additional staff will be in the nature of a reserve and may be drawn from various departments. During normalcy, this staff will not be called on to perform any duty in the DCR. This staff will be responsible for managing the desk arrangements mentioned earlier.

The departmental officers nominated as “Officer-in-Charge” from the concerned line departments and other agencies will be available in the DCR during the disaster period.

Departments have appointed the senior-most District Officer of the department as “Officer-in-Charge”.

The Collector, Additional Collector, Assistant Collector, Resident Deputy Collector, all Deputy Collectors, SDOs and Tahsildars are familiar with the functioning of DCR.

Officers-in-Charge drawn from various line departments and agencies will be provided orientation through training programmes to be organised by YASHADA.


Multi-district Disasters

In case of disasters which have an impact on more than one district in a division the role of the Divisional Commissioner comes into prominence . The Commissioner’s responsibilities shall include exercising general supervision over the work of preparation of contingency plan undertaken by the Collectors in his Division and also on the relief and rehabilitation operations in those districts.

At the Divisional Commissioner’s level all the state departments and agencies have a regional head. It is very practical for the Divisional Commissioner to seek the support of these regional heads towards the commitment of regional resources to a disaster situation.

For a disaster in more than one district (within or across the division), the role of Divisional Commissioner is to:

provide a unified command through inter-district control room

ensure need-based resource allocations amongst districts

seek the support of regional heads of line departments for relief

Direct and Coordinate in response to requirements from district control room the services of

Ø Ø MSRTC

Ø Ø State Government departments

Ø Ø SRP, CRPF, Home Guards, Coast Guards, CPWD, CISF

Ø Ø Fire Brigade, Civil Defence

Ø Ø Telecommunications

maintain a close liaison with the EOC

seek policy guidelines, if necessary

Mobilise services of Central/State government laboratories and recognised research centres for specialised services

In such a situation, the Divisional Commissioner will act

as the Additional Relief Commissioner for the disaster area,

his powers will be analogous to that of Relief Commissioner in the EOC.

Ø Ø will access funds from the State Government for this purpose

Ø Ø will be assisted by Deputy Commissioner, Revenue in discharge of disaster

management functions as is the normal practice.

Ø Ø will receive the support of other Deputy Commissioners and Assistant Commissioners

and Line Department Heads.

[The district control rooms would continue to function in their respective districts and perform all the functions as per the DDMAP].

 



RESPONSE STRUCTURE

Planning Assumptions

The multi-disaster response plan takes a generic approach to disaster situations to identify information requirements along with communication, coordination, monitoring and institutional arrangements.

The overall response structure remains constant irrespective of the type of disaster.

The flow chart indicate the chain of command that should be set in motion in order to manage the disaster.

Response Plan on occurrence of disaster

List of Key Officials of various departments

Sr.No

Name of Department

Designation of Department Head

Office Phone

Resident

Phone

Fax No.

1

Indian Meteorology Deptt.

Dy.Director General of Meteorology,Nagpur

222157

-------

222157

2

Industries

Joint Director, Industrial, Nagpur.

Health and safety.

530745

524105

 

---------

530745

3

Irrigation Deptt.

Executive Engineer

Tultuli.

Executive Engineer

(Irrigation) ZP  Gadchiroli.

22362

 

22334

 

22264

 

22344

22276

4

Police Deptt.

District  Superintendent  of Police, Gadchiroli.

22307

22327

22341

5

Fire Brigade

Chief Officer Municipal

Council ,Gadchiroli.

Chief Officer Municipal Council Wadsa.

22379

 

 

72372

22378

 

 

72042

 

6

Health

1)      1)      D.H.O.

2)      2)      Civil Surgeon

22317

22320

22337

22330

 

22320

7

EOC

1)S.D.O.  Gadchiroli

2)S.D.O.Wadsa

3)S.D.O.Aheri

22235

72370

72041

22336

72371

72042

22235

72371

72041

8

Divisional Commissioner

Commissioner Office,Nagpur.

555515

522123

502043

9

Collector

Collector,Gadchiroli

22201

22202

22302

10

R.D.C.

Resi.Dy.Collector

Gadchiroli.

22322

22318

22302

11

T.V.

Asst.Engr.

Doordarshan Centre

Gadchiroli.

22400

 

 

12

Civil Defence

Director , National

Civil Defence College,Nagpur.

531614

 

531614

13

Home Guard

District Commandant,

Home Guard ,Gadchiroli.

22408

 

 

14

Executive Engineer

PWD.

Executive Engineer

Dn. I & II

22405

22203

 

15

Executive Engineer

MSEB.

Executive engineer

22207

22419

 



16

NGOs

1)      1)      Dandkaranya Education Society.

      Gadchiroli.

2)      2)      Platinum Jubeeli (Ismail Khoja)Convents School Gadchiroli.

3)      3)      Bahu-uudeshiya

Krida Prabodhini

Complex

Gadchiroli.

 

 

 

 

22504

 

 

17

Railway

1)      1)      Divisional Rly.

Manager,Nagpur

2)      2)      Station Master

Desaiganj.(wadsa)

526939

 

 

18

Finance

1)      1)      Secretary Finance

2)      2)      District Treasury Officer.Gad.

 

22331

 

 

19

Civil Supplies

1)Secretaty,Food and  Civil Supplies.

3)      3)      District Supply

   Officer.

 

 

22305

 

 

22319

 

20

Forest

Dy.Conservator of Forest Gadchiroli.

(Nodal Officer)

22289

22288

 

21

Housing

1)Secretary Housing Govt.of Maharashtra.

2)Vidarbha Housing Board Nagpur.

 

 

 

22

Agriculture

1)Secretary,Agriculture Govt. of  Maharashtra

2)Agriculture Development Officer.Z.P. Gadchiroli.

 

 

 

23

Water Supply

ExecutiveEngineer,

Jeevan Pradhikaran on Water supply board

Gadchiroli.

22513

22514

 

24

Zilla Parishad

Chief Executive Officer Gadchiroli.

22304

22316

22343

25

R.T.O.

Gadchiroli.

 

 

 

26

District Information Officer,

District Information Officer,Gadchiroli.

22294

22352

 

27

District Manager Telephone.

Sub Divisional Engineer

Telephone.

22600

22500

 

28

Urban Developmemt.

Municipal Commissioner

N.M.C. Nagpur.

532464

532057

 

Involvement and Assistance available to Departments from Private Sector/Academic Institutions


Police Department

The following colleges have NCC and NSS volunteers who can help the police.

Sr.No
Name of College/School
Place
No.of Volunteers (NCC)
No.of volunteers (NSS)
Total No.of volunteers
Phone.Nos
1. Shri Shivaji Art and Commerce College Gadchiroli .
Gadchiroli ---------- 100 100 22244
2. Shri Shivaji High-School Gadchiroli.
Gadchiroli 100 ------------- 100 -----------
3. Raje Vishweshwarrao Education Society College,Aheri.
Aheri ----------------- 100 100 -------------
4. Govt.Science College. Gadchiroli
Gadchiroli ------------- 50
50 -----------

 

Following is a list of timber merchants who can provide firewood for disposal of dead bodies.

1) 1) Shri Sai Saw Mill ,Gadchiroli.

2) 2) Ajij R.Panjawani , Gandhi Chowk, Main Road , Armori, Dist. Gadchiroli.

3) 3) Shri.Dhulariya and Brothers Betkati, Tq.Korchi , Dist. Gadchiroli.

4) 4) M/s. Samarth Saw Mill ,Ramnagar,Chandrapur.

5) 5) Dy. Conservator of Forest, Gadchiroli Dn.Gadchiroli.

6) 6) Dy. Conservator of Forest, Wadsa Dn. Wadsa.

7) 7) Dy. Conservator of Forest, Allapalli Dn. Allapalli Tq. Aheri.

8) 8) Dy. Conservator of Forest,, Sironcha Dn. Allapalli Tq.Allapali.

9) 9) Dy. Conservator of Forest, Bhamragad, Dn. Allapali Tq.Aheri.

PWD

The names and addresses of contractors with the details of equipments,available with them.These contractors can help in repairs of roads, bridges and buildings, construction of relief camps, clearance of debris etc.

Sr.No. Name Address & Telephone No. Equipment
Available

1 Aditya Construction Shastri Nagar Mul Road Poclain –2

Prop.H.M.Sancheti Chandrapur. Exavator –2

Ph.No. 54916,52960. Tipper-10

Rollers-2

Water Tanker- 1

2 R.K.Sancheti Shastri Nagar Mul Road Poclain-2

Prop.V.K.Sancheti Chandrapur. Exavator-2

Ph.No. 52057,54174 Tipper-10

51146. Roller-2

Water Tanker-2

3 National Construction Civil Lines,Chandrapur. Tippers-10

Company. Ph.No. 55112 Truck-5

Prop.Girish Thakker. Roller-5

Hotmix plant-1

4 Shri Gajanan Construction Civil Lines, Exacator-2

Company. Chandrapur. Tipper -6

Prop. C.N.Wasade. Ph,No. 54186,51868 Roller-2

Hotmix plant-1

Truck – 4

5 Seth Construction Company Commercial Complex Exavator-2

Prop.Yashpal Seth. Gandhi Chowk,Chandrapur Roller-1

Ph.No.52228 Tipper-4

6 Ajwani Construction MIDC Ghugus Road, Exavator-2

Company. Chandrapur. Roller-2

Prop.G.H.Ajwani Hotmix plant-1

7 P.G.Trivedi SBI Colony ,Chandrapur. Poclain-2

Tipper-3

Roller-2

8 George Construction 9-C , Shastri Nagar Roller-2

Company. Chandrapur. Tipper-4

Prop.K.J.George Ph.No.55461,53115 Truck-4

Mixer-4

9 Kalika Prasad Gupta Gandhi Chowk ,Ballarpur. Roller-1

Ph.No.40607,40507. Truck-2

Tipper-2

10 Laxmi Construction Rajura Exavator-1

Prop.Laxman Gupta. Ph.No. 22011 Roller-2

Truck-4

Tipper-3


Agricultural Department

List Of Wholesalers Of Seeds Fertilizers And Pestisides :(From Chandrapur District But Useful For Gadchiroli District )

Sr.No.

             Name

          Address

Telephone No.

 

1   

Kisan Krushi Sewa Kendra

Prop.K.R.Mamidwar.

Sarafa line ,Chandrapur

55106,

55916

2

Adarsha Krushi Kendra.

Prop.G.N.Regundawar.

Girnar Chowk, Kasturba Road

Chandrapur.

54429

3

Adarsha Krushi Kendra.

Prop.G.N.Regundawar.

Nehru Chowk,Warora.

82176

4

Kasikar Krushi Sewa Kendra,

Prop.Satish Kasikar.

Main Road,Warora.

82083

82134

5

Avinash Krushi Kendra

Prop.S.R.Chillawar.

Main Road, Gadchandur

Tq. Rajura

46730

22513

6

Bandal Krushi Kendra

Nehru Chowk,Main Road

Rajura.

22177

22577

7

Deepak Krushi Kendra

Prop.Deepak Urade

Station Road, Bramhapuri

72273

 

8

Chandak Agro Centre

Prop.Rajendra Chandak

Main Road,  Rajura .

 

 

22285

9

Diwase Agro. Industries.

Prop.G.S.Diwase

Chanda  Co.-op.Industirial

 Estate. Mul Road Chandrapur.

54338

10

Noorani Fertilizers

Bazar Chowk ,Nagbhid.

6673

11

Pawan Krushi Kendra,

Prop.Pandurang Bartine.

Opp.Bank Of India,

Bhadrawati.

65167

12

Prashant Krushi Kendra.

Prop.Ramchandra Sharma.

Allapalli  Road ,Gondpimpri.

56354

56354

13

Suyog Krushi Kendra

Prop.Suresh Bobde.

Near Gram Panchayat

Ghugus.

75656

 

R.T.O

The details of buses available with private owners

Sr.No

M.V.No.

Name and Address of Registered owner.

1

MH 33 -1005

Shri.Hiralal Yethmal Motwani.

At.Post.Tq. Wadsa, Dist. Gadchiroli.

2

MH 33 -1006

Shri. Suresh Vasantrao Poreddiwar.

Dhanora Road Gadchiroli.

3

MH 33 –1007

Smt. Sindhubai Vasantrao Poreddiwar.

Dhanora Road Gadchiroli.

4

MH 33 –1008

Shri Ashok Shankarrao Mallerwar.

Mul Road, Gadchiroli.

5

MH 33 –1009

Shri.Narendra Shankarrao Mallerwar,

Shubhash ward, Mul Road Gadchiroli.

6

 

MH 33 –1010

MH 33 -1011

Shri.Bandopant Shankarrao Mallerwar,

At .Jambai. Post. Karwafa, Tah.Dhanora, Dist.Gadchiroli.

7

MH 33 –1012

Shri.Ashok Shankarrao Mallerwar,

At. Jambai, Post. Karwafa, Tq.Dhanora,Dist.Gadchiroli.

8

MH 33 –1013

Shri.Hiralal Jethmal Motwani,

At. Post. Tq. Wadsa,Dist.Gadchiroli.

9

MH 33 –1016

Shri Vasant Balaji Poreddiwar,

At.Post Gadchiroli.

10

MH 33 –1017

Shri Bandopant Shankarrao Mallelwar,

At. Jambai  Post.Karwafa, Tq.Dhanora,Dist.Gadchiroli.

11

MH 33 -1020

Shri Virendra Sewakram Ambarte,

Dhanora Road,Lanjeda,Gadchiroli.

12

MH 33 -1021

Shri.Satyanarayan Rajmallanjayas Margoni,

At.Post,Tq.Sironcha,Dist.Gadchiroli.

13

MH 33 –1026

Shri Umesh Vasantrao Poreddiwar,

Rampuri Ward ,Dhanora Road ,Gadchiroli.

14

MH 33 – 1059

Shri.Bandopant Shankarrao Mallelwar,

At.Wasa,Post.Porla,Dist.Gadchiroli.

15

MH 33 –501

Shri.Chandrakant Baburao Suronwar,

Suresh Ward Gadchiroli.

16

MH 33 –503

Pundlik Ramchandra  Akore.

At.Post,Tq. Kurkheda.Dist.Gadchiroli.


Health Department
List Of Private Hospitals With The Number Of Bed Available.

Sr.No

Name of Taluka

Name of Hospital and phone No.

No.of Bed available

Facilities.

1

Gadchiroli

1)Dhanwantri Hospital Gadchiroli. Ph.No. 22596

2)Sai Nursing home and Hospital Gadchiroli.Ph.No.32303

3)Balwant Smruti Hospital Gadchiroli. Ph.no.22547

4)A & E Hospital Gadchiroli.Ph.No.22458

3

 

10

 

5

2

Medical Help.

 

As above

 

As above

As above.

2

Kurkheda

Aamhi Aamchya Aarogyasathi,Kurkheda

Ph.No.4471

____

As above

3

Dhanora

Search Hospital,Shodhgram (Chatgaon)PH.No.5406,07,08,(O)/ 54012®

20

Ambulance and Medical help.

4

Aheri

Assisi Sewa Sadan Hospital,Nagepalli.

Ph.No.6461

50

Medical Help.

5

Bhamragad

Lokbiradari Prakalpa Hospital ,Hemalkasa.

10

Ambulance and Medical Help.

6

Sironcha

Chason Memorial Hospital,Sironcha.

5

As above.

List of Private Doctors with their Speciality

Sr.No

Name of Doctor.

           Address

Ph.No.

         Speciality

1

Dr.S.B.Kumbhare

Dhanwantri Hospital Gadchiroli

22596

Physician and Radiologists.

2

Dr.Mrs.Rathod

Sai Nursing Home Gadchiroli.

32303

Gynacologists.

3

Dr.A.G.Deshpande

A & I Hospital Gadchiroli

22458

As above.

4

Dr.Hemant Appalwar

Balwant Smruti Hospital Gacchiroli.

22547

Opthamologists.

5

Dr.Mrs.Appalwar

As above

22547

Physician.

6

Dr.Mrs.Palpaukar

Gadchiroli

------

Physician

7

Dr.Wardhewar

Gadchiroli

------

Physician

8

Dr.Lakhari

Gadchiroli

22218

Physician

9

Dr.Gagpalliwar

Gadchiroli

32429

Physician

10

Dr.Jain

Gadchiroli

22557

Physician

11

Dr.Mrs.Jain

Gadchiroli

22557

Physician

12

Dr.Zoting

Gadchiroli

22427

Physician

13

Dr.Kolhe

Gadchiroli

-----

Physician

14

Dr.Unadkar

Gadchiroli

22205

Physician

15

Dr.Choudhary

Gadchiroli

-----

Physician

16

Dr.Ram Sharma

Gadchiroli

32304

Physician

17

Dr.Abhay Bang

Search Hospital,Shodh Gram , Chatgaon.

5406,07

Peadiatrician

18

Dr.Mrs.Rani Bang

As above

5407,08

Gynacologists

19

Dr.Mrs.Tajane

Gadchiroli

------

Physician

 

Animal Husbandry

Sr.No.

Name of veterinary institute

Name of veterinarian

1

Porla grade I

Dr.Pakhale

2

Potegaon

Dr.Satish Raju

3

Yeoli

Dr.Gaygavli

4

Amirza grade II

Vacant

5

Pardi

Tembhekar

6

Guruvala

Pendam

7

Moushikhamb

Narnaware

8

Aambi Shivani

Hirapure

9

Aarmori

 Dr. Mahajan

10

Vairagad

Dr.Khale

11

Injewari

--------

12

Delanwari

Dr.Ghodke

13

Vadha Grade II

Madavi

14

Kasvi

Bokade

15

Wasala

Nannavare

16

Wadsa Grade I

Dr. Rewatkar

17

Vihirgaon  Grade II

Nakate

18

Kondhala  Grade II

Randiwe

19

Koregaon Grade II

Jumnake

20

Kurkheda

Dr.Mrs.Khobragade

21

Gewardha

Dr.Mahalle

22

Kadholi

Dr.Sharme

23

Ramgad

Dr.Bawane

24

Sonsari Grade II

Waghade

25

Malewada

Hatwar

26

Ghati

Gajwe

27

Aangara

More

28

Korchi Grade I

Dr.Mal

29

Maseli Grade II

Kapgate

30

Betkathi

Kannake

31

Kotgul

Bikundi

32

Adpalli Grade I

Dr.Waghade

33

Mulchera Grade II

Katwe

34

Gomni

Dharne

35

Lagam

Masram

36

Dhanora Grade I

Dr.Wagh

37

Murumgaon

Dr.Gondane

38

Dhudhmala

Dr.Poharkar

39

Yerkad

Dr.Jambule

40

Pendhari Grade II

Gajbhiye

41

Mohali

Kharate

42

Mendhatola

Yerme

43

Sawargaon

Dhekwar

44

Karwafa

Uikey

45

Chamorshi Grade II

Dr. Nagrale

46

Kunghada

Dr. N. S .Sonkusare.

47

Aashti

Dr. Rehpade

48

Konsari

Dr. Pant

49

Ghot

Dr. Sambharkar

50

Bhendatola

Darge

51

Regadi

Adkine.

52

Waigaon

Bokade

53

Aadyal

Palide

54

Aamgaon

Tekam

55

Chapalwada

Bulkunde

56

Murkkhal

Borkar

57

Vyasampur Bori

Gabhane

58

Aheri Grade II

Dr. Pande

59

Govindgaon

Dr. Sonkusare

60

Kamalapur

Dr. Neware

61

Velgur

Dr. Wankhede

62

Perimili

Dr. Ramteke

63

Dewalmari Grade II

Gongale

64

Rajaram

Tembhare

65

Umanur

Ghurde

66

Dechalipetha

Nagose

67

Bori

Upadhey

68

Sironcha Grade I

Dr. Wanjari

69

Aankisa

Dr. Bokade

70

Rangayapalli Grade II

Kudmeghe

71

Pentipaka

Gawande

72

Tekda

Kumre

73

Asarli

Patel

74

Bamni

Kudmeghe

75

Bhamragad Grade I

Dr. Meshram

76

Laheri Grade II

Gawad

77

Tadgaon

Dhakane

78

Mannerajaram

Shrirame

79

Etapalli Grade I

Dr. Khandekar

80

Hallewada

Dr. Itankar

81

Jarawandi

Dr. Dhaware

82

Kasansur Grade II

Jadhao

83

Ghodsur

Tembhare

84

Gatta

Sayam

85

Burgi

Madavi

86

Geva

Hajare

87

Hedri

Jumnake

88

Mobile squad Allapalli

Dr. Tasmale

89

Mobile squad  Dhanora

Dr. Nimbalkar

90

Mobile squad Shankarpur

Dr. Bhinurkar

91

Mobile squad Sironcha

Dr. Chopde

92

Mobile squad Aashti

Dr. Pendharkar

93

Mobile squad Purada

Dr. Sawarkar

94

All Animal Hospitals

Dr. Bagade

95

D.A.I .C.

Dr. Chimote

96

Integrated Tribal Development Project Bhamragad.

Dr.Bhisekar

 

District Information Officer

List of newspapers published from Gadchiroli and newspapers having offices in Gadchiroli

Sr.No.

Name and address of newspaper / representative

1.

Daily Loksatta, Dhanora road, Gadchiroli. Phone 32309

2.

Daily Hitavad, Gokul Nagar, gadchiroli. Phone 22549 / 32259

3.

Daily Tarun Bharat, Trimurti Chowk, Gadchiroli. Phone 32443

4.

Daily Navbharat, Near Police Station, Gadchiroli. Phone 22572

5.

Daily Janvad, P.O. Armori.

6.

Daily Lokmat, Gandhi Chowk, Gadchiroli. Phone 22557

7.

Daily Maharashtra Times, Behind Shivaji college, Gadchiroli. Phone32334

8.

Daily samna, Rampuri Ward, Gadchiroli Phone 22794

9.

Daily Mahavidarbha, Gadchiroli

10.

Daily Adivasi Manus, Near Police Station, Gadchiroli. Phone 22424

11.

Daily Gadchiroli Patrika, Near Ram Mandir, Gadchiroli. Phone 32410

12.

Weekly Zopadpattitil Vichar, Near Ram Mandir, Gadchiroli. Phone 32410

13.

Weekly Gadchiroli Samachar, Camp Area, Gadchiroli. Phone 32371

14.

Weekly Gadchiroli Savera, Kabra Niwas, Gadchiroli. Phone 32527

15.

Weekly Manav Sanskriti, Dhanora Road, Gadchiroli. Phone 22519

16.

Weekly Vainganga Pukar, Ramnagar ward, Gadchiroli. Phone 22886

17.

Weekly Gadchiroli Mahila, Gadchiroli. Phone 22458

18.

Weekly Chamorshi Lalkar. Phone 32238

19.

Weekly Gadchiroli.Senapati, Talav Road, gadchiroli

20.

Weekly Ektechi Haak, Phule Ward, Gadchiroli.

21.

Weekly Margdeep, Athwadi Bazar, Gadchiroli

22.

Weekly Gadchiroli Vaibhav, Gadchiroli

23.

Weekly Shivchatra

24.

Weekly Vanlaxmi, Chamoshi road, Gadchiroli

25.

Weekly Dhandal, Wadsa, Gadchiroli


Earthquakes

Planning Assumptions

Earthquakes have large spatial and temporal impacts. Resource requirements are both intensive and extensive for management of earthquakes, in terms of the number of agencies involved and the nature of coordination required.

Lead Agencies

The lead agencies involved in the management of earthquakes are revenue, police, fire, and medical services.

Due to extensive damage to infrastructure, the Telecommunication, MSEB, MWSSB and Public Works Departments play an important role in the management of this disaster.

As a result of earthquakes, floods and epidemics can also occur. Therefore stress is laid on measures taken to ensure coordination with health and irrigation departments.

Nature of Damages

The impact of earthquakes differs for urban and rural areas, primarily because of the nature of infrastructure, quality of housing and occupational differences. In rural areas, it is primarily the housing and physical structures (including irrigation infrastructure) which may suffer extensive damage, without necessarily destroying the crops.

In urban areas, in addition to housing and physical infrastructures, it may also disturb the service infrastructure such as water supply, sewage, telephones, electricity etc., which are essentially underground installations and hence exposed to a direct impact.

Possible Impacts

Effects on Individual

Ø Ø Loss of Life

Ø Ø Injuries demanding surgical needs

Ø Ø Family disruption

Specific demands raised or required

Ø Ø Orthopedic surgery and fractures needing treatment

Ø Ø Individuals trapped under debris need to be located and rescued which calls for not only earth moving equipments, but the services of sniffer dogs.

Ø Ø Expertise of fire brigade and defence services may be essential in the rescue operations.

Ø Ø In case of separation of family members information counters play an important role.

Ø Ø In case of family disruption resulting from death of major earner, economic rehabilitation of the family may have to be planned as a long-term strategy.

Ø Ø Loss of life, property and livestock may require damage assessment procedures to avoid litigations and delays in gratuitous relief and compensation.

Damage caused

Ø Ø Houses

Ø Ø Personal Belongings

Ø Ø Livestock

Specific demands raised or required

Ø Ø Partially damaged houses needs technical inspection to decide the habitation worthiness and the extent of repairs required.

Ø Ø Certain partially damaged houses may require demolition.

Ø Ø As far as possible, reconstruction will take place on the same sites to avoid delays, secure cultural continuity and avoid costly land purchase. In extreme situations, new sites for resettlement may have to be identified when removal of rubble and debris is non-viable.

Ø Ø Salvaging personal belongings from the debris needs clearance from technical personnel to ensure safety of persons engaged.

Ø Ø As far as possible, family members only will be permitted to salvage their individual family belongings.

Damage to infrastructure resulting in disruption of services

Ø Ø Buildings

Ø Ø Dams

Ø Ø Bridges

Ø Ø Road Surface and Rail Lines

Ø Ø Power Stations

Ø Ø Water pipelines and water tanks

Ø Ø Sewer lines

Ø Ø Underground Cables

Specific demands raised or required

Ø Ø Care needs to be taken to ensure that all electrical supplies to damaged area are disconnected promptly by MSEB.

Ø Ø Underground cables need thorough inspection before power is restored.

Ø Ø Breaches or cracks in the dam need Irrigation Department to secure the breaches or grouting the cracks.

Ø Ø In case of damage to bridges, relief operations may require temporary bridges which can be put up with the assistance of army.

Ø Ø Certain roads needing resurfacing will need immediate action from PWD.

Ø Ø MWSSB in consultations with health authorities should restore existing water supply with necessary repairs. This may call for replacement of pipelines or arrangements for storage in portable PVC water tanks.

Ø Ø In some cases, restoration of existing water supply may be time-consuming and therefore water tankers may have to be pressed into service.

Ø Ø Identification of nearby water sources and checking water’s potability may also be required.

Ø Ø Damage to sewer lines is to be looked into. Alternate arrangements by way of temporary latrines (technical details given on Pg. No ) may have to be constructed.

Ø Ø Extensive damage to residential buildings resulting in disruption of telecommunication facilities requires provision/installation of public telephones (PCO) to facilitate communication.

Ø Ø Damage to hospital, school buildings and other public facilities may disrupt the services. In such a case restoration of services through temporary arrangements is the first priority.

Ø Ø PWD may have to take repairs or reconstruction of such public facilities on a priority basis.

Environmental Effects

Ø Ø Alteration in river and stream flow

Ø Ø Liquefaction

Specific demands raised or required

Ø Ø Areas indicating signs of liquefaction should be declared out of bounds and strict vigil should be kept by police to prohibit trespassing.

Ø Ø Foundations of the building in the area prone to liquefaction need technical assessment.

Ø Ø Alteration in river and stream flow particularly when it covers a settlement create immediate demands for evacuation and relief till such time that the areas for new settlement identified and rehabilitation works are executed.

Economic and Social consequences

Ø Ø Loss of livelihood

Ø Ø Disruption of market and Loss in production

Ø Ø Migration

Ø Ø Disruption of social structure including breakdown of social order and organisations

Ø Ø Law and order problem

Ø Ø Psychological after-effects such as individual trauma and depression

Specific demands raised or required

In addition to immediate relief requirements for effective and early recovery process, checking migration

Ø Ø restoration of production units, and employment avenues

Ø Ø provision of individual counselling and community counselling

Ø Ø Reconstruction of social structures and organisation of community requires participation of non-governmental organisations District administration must invite or coopt voluntary agencies to ensure this aspect.

Ø Ø For combating depression, engage people in all possible activities related to relief and rehabilitation through a deliberate strategy of community participation.

Secondary effects

Ø Ø Fires

Ø Ø Rains

Ø Ø Landslides

Specific demands raised or required

Ø Ø Fires resulting from earthquake are essentially a result of damage to infrastructure such as power supply.

Ø Ø Immediate service of fire brigade is essential to check further damage.

Ø Ø Immediate discontinuation of power would restrict the possibility of occurrence to a large extent.

Ø Ø Rains following earthquakes essentially disrupt rescue and relief operations. Rescue and relief teams therefore must prepare themselves in anticipation and get community cooperation to overcome such difficulties.

Ø Ø Rains also have implication for storage of food, fuel for cooking (firewood or coal) and fodder for the cattle. Protective structures therefore for the storage of all relief material becomes essential. Plastic materials and water-proof containers are required.

Ø Ø Damage to road access due to landslides needs immediate clearing and PWD has to keep itself prepared for such an eventuality.

Ø Ø Settlements on the hill-slope prone to landslides need to be shifted to safer places.


Floods

Planning Assumptions

Ø Ø Floods occur with warning, while flash flood occur with very little warning.

Ø Ø Flood prone areas in India are demarcated as either blue or red lines depending on the frequency of occurrence. Blue lines are those areas where floods can occur once every five years whereas red lines are areas where floods can occur once every hundred years.

Ø Ø The resource requirements for management of flood is extremely intensive involving large scale mobilization of resources.

Lead Agencies

Ø Ø The lead agencies are the revenue, police, irrigation, and medical services.

Ø Ø Extensive damage to infrastructure and public utilities is possible hence the role of supporting agencies such as MSEB, Telecommunications and PWD is crucial.

Ø Ø The loss to crop or plantation demands involvement of Agriculture Department, ZP

Ø Ø Loss of cattle will bring in the role for Animal Husbandry, ZP.

Ø Ø The assistance and intervention of the EOC is essential to support the district administration in the management of these disasters.

Ø Ø Additionally, secondary disasters such as epidemics may be caused due to floods and must be monitored by Public Health Department.

Possible Impacts

Effects on Individual

Ø Ø Loss of Life

Ø Ø Injuries demanding medical attention

Ø Ø Water-borne infection

Specific demands raised or required

Ø Ø In most cases, orthopedic surgery, fractures, cuts and bruises need immediate attention.

Ø Ø Cases of water-borne infection need medication.

Ø Ø Mass immunisation, when necessary, to protect individuals from water-borne diseases.

Ø Ø Marooned individuals, including those trapped on tree-tops and building terraces need to be located and rescued which calls for boats, or at times helicopter services.

Ø Ø Alternatively when large sections of community are marooned instead of evacuation it may be necessary to organise dispatch of relief supplies to marooned locations. This creates a special need for transport facility.

Ø Ø Expertise of fire brigade and defence services may be essential in the rescue operations.

Impact at family level

Ø Ø Separated families

Ø Ø Missing persons

Ø Ø Family disorganisation

Specific demands raised or required

Ø Ø In case of separation of family members information counters would play an important role.

Ø Ø In case of family disruption resulting from death of major earner, economic rehabilitation of the family may have to be planned as a long-term strategy.

Ø Ø Loss of life, property and livestock may require damage assessment procedures to avoid litigations and delays in gratuitous relief and compensation.

Damage caused

Ø Ø Houses

Ø Ø Personal Belongings

Ø Ø Livestock

Ø Ø Crops and plantations

Ø Ø Land

Specific demands raised or required

Ø Ø Partially damaged houses needs technical inspection to decide the habitation worthiness and the extent of repairs required.

Ø Ø Certain partially damaged houses may require demolition.

Ø Ø As far as possible, reconstruction should take place on the same sites to avoid delays, secure cultural continuity and avoid costly land purchase. In extreme situations, new sites for resettlement may have to be identified when removal of rubble and debris is non-viable.

Ø Ø Salvaging personal belongings from the debris needs clearance from technical personnel to ensure safety of persons engaged.

Ø Ø As far as possible, family members only should be permitted to salvage their individual family belongings.

Ø Ø Damage to crops, plantations or agriculture land will need a long-term intervention.

Damage to infrastructure and disruption of services

Ø Ø Buildings

Ø Ø Godowns and storages

Ø Ø Dams

Ø Ø Bridges

Ø Ø Road Surface and Rail Lines

Ø Ø Power Stations

Ø Ø Water pipelines and water tanks

Ø Ø Sewer lines

Ø Ø Underground Cables

Ø Ø Ports and Jetties

Ø Ø Communication Lines

Specific demands raised or required

Ø Ø Care needs to be taken to ensure that all electrical supplies to damaged area are disconnected promptly by MSEB.

Ø Ø Underground cables need thorough inspection before power is restored.

Ø Ø Damage to electric poles and transmission lines needs restoration.

Ø Ø Breaches or cracks in the dam need Irrigation Department to secure the breaches or grouting the cracks.

Ø Ø In case of damage to bridges, relief operations may require temporary bridges which can be put up with the assistance of army.

Ø Ø Certain roads needing resurfacing will need immediate action from PWD.

Ø Ø Roads blocked due to uprooting of trees and electric poles may need to be cleared on a priority basis.

Ø Ø MWSSB in consultations with health authorities should restore existing water supply with necessary repairs. This may call for replacement of pipelines or arrangements for storage in portable PVC water tanks.

Ø Ø In some cases, restoration of existing water supply may be time-consuming and therefore water tankers may have to be pressed into service.

Ø Ø Identification of nearby water sources and checking the potability of the same may also be required.

Ø Ø Damage or choking of sewer lines is one of the most ticklish issue. Alternate arrangements by way of temporary latrines (technical details given on Pg. No ) may have to be constructed.

Ø Ø Extensive damage to residential buildings resulting in disruption of telecommunication facilities requires provision of public telephones (PCO) to facilitate communication.

Ø Ø Damage to hospital, school buildings and other public facilities may disrupt the services. In such a case restoration of services through temporary arrangements is the first priority.

Ø Ø PWD may have to take repairs or reconstruction of such public facilities on a priority basis.

Ø Ø Disposal of damaged foodgrains is one of the major step and needs community cooperation.

Ø Ø Provision for distribution of cooked food or dry rations may have to be made.

Environmental Effects

Ø Ø soil erosion

Ø Ø silting

Ø Ø water pollution

Ø Ø denudation of land

Ø Ø increase in salinity

Specific demands raised or required

Ø Ø Silting in residential areas and buildings is one of the major problems requiring extensive community involvement.

Ø Ø NGOs have demonstrated a tremendous capacity to mobilise community participation in desilting operations for reoccupancy of the residences and also the wells providing drinking water.

Ø Ø Agriculture department may have to undertake soil-testing and propose appropriate measures for restoration of agriculture land.

Economic and Social consequences

Ø Ø Loss of livelihood

Ø Ø Disruption of market and Loss in production

Ø Ø Migration

Ø Ø Disruption of social structure including breakdown of social order

Ø Ø and community organisations

Ø Ø Law and order problem

Ø Ø Psychological after-effects like depression, trauma etc.

Specific demands raised or required

In addition to immediate relief requirements for effective and early recovery process and checking migration

Ø Ø restoration of production units, and employment avenues

Ø Ø provision of individual counselling and community counselling

Ø Ø Reconstruction of social structures and organisation of community requires a professional intervention which can best come from non-governmental organisations Voluntary agencies will have to be invited or coopted for relief activities to ensure this aspect.

Ø Ø For combating depression, engage people in all possible activities related to relief and rehabilitation through a deliberate strategy of community participation.

Secondary effects

Ø Ø Epidemics

Ø Ø Landslides

Specific demands raised or required

Ø Ø Rescue and relief teams must be alert to the possibility of outbreak of epidemics and therefore ensure standards of services with respect to storage, cooking, and handling of food materials as also disposal of waste in relief camps, medical centres and feeding centres.

Ø Ø Water-quality monitoring mechanisms will have to be set-up to prevent outbreak of epidemics.

Ø Ø Rains also have implication for storage of food, fuel for cooking (firewood or coal) and fodder for the cattle. Protective structures therefore for the storage of all relief material becomes essential. Plastic materials and water-proof containers are required.

Ø Ø Damage to road access due to landslides needs immediate clearing and PWD has to keep itself prepared for such an eventuality.

Ø Ø Settlements on the hill-slope prone to landslides need to be shifted to safer places.

Epidemics

Planning Assumptions

Ø Ø The existing water quality monitoring and vector control programmes reduces the possibility of spread of epidemics to a considerable extent.

Ø Ø Efficient response from pathological and testing laboratories helps in early diagnosis of the possible epidemic.

Lead Agencies

Ø Ø The revenue and health department inlcuding the medical service is the main agency involved in disaster management during epidemics.

Ø Ø In the case of epidemics accompanying floods the water supply and sanitation department, MWSSB and irrigation department are the support agencies

Ø Ø Apart from these support services, assistance is also sought from the police and home guards, public works department, state transport and the media.

Possible Impacts

Effects on Individual

Ø Ø Loss of Life

Ø Ø Diseases needing Epidemiological Treatment

Specific demands raised or required

Ø Ø Mass immunisation, when necessary, to protect individuals.

Ø Ø In some cases, existing water supply may be contaminated and therefore water tankers may have to be pressed into service.

Ø Ø Identification of nearby water sources and checking the potability of the same may also be required.

Ø Ø Rescue and relief teams must be alert to the possibility of spread of epidemics and therefore ensure standards of services with respect to storage, cooking, and handling of food materials as also disposal of waste in relief camps, medical centres and feeding centres.

Ø Ø Water-quality monitoring mechanisms will have to be set-up to prevent spread of epidemics.

Ø Ø In case of vector-borne diseases, the exact vector and related control methods will have to be followed. The required materials are listed on (pg. No)

Ø Ø Life-saving drugs including saline will be required in large quantities

Ø Ø Disposable kits for treatment of affected people and arrangements for proper disposal of these.

Ø Ø Personal protection kits for medical personnel and volunteers assisting in treatment of patients.

Ø Ø Arrangements for disposal of personal belongings and other solid waste materials.

Ø Ø Monitoring arrangements including testing facilities with the help of laboratories and hospitals.

Economic and Social consequences

Ø Ø Migration

Ø Ø Evacuation

Ø Ø Law and order problem

Ø Ø Psychological after-effects especially isolation

Specific demands raised or required

In addition to immediate medical relief requirements for effective and early recovery process and checking migration

Ø Ø restoration of potable water supply

Ø Ø provision of

Þ Þ quarantine of infected cases at family and hospital level

Þ Þ programme of immunisation

Þ Þ water quality monitoring

Þ Þ pathological testing laboratories

Þ Þ individual counselling

Þ Þ family counselling

Ø Ø Involvement of NGOs in mobilising community efforts for the control of epidemics by ensuring standards of environmental sanitation, disposal of waste and personal hygiene.


Road Accidents


Planning Assumptions

Ø Ø The major road accidents are highly localised.

Ø Ø The response machinery that is to be activated is at a much more local level

Ø Ø In case of road accidents involving toxic and highly inflammable materials, there is need for temporary evacuation.

Lead Agencies

Ø Ø The lead agencies are revenue, police and the regional transport office.

Ø Ø In major accidents involving loss of life and injuries to a large number of people, services of agencies such as fire services, health department will be needed

Ø Ø In the case of a vehicle plunge in the river, services of divers for rescue operations are required.

Possible Impacts

Effects on Individuals

Ø Ø Loss of Life

Ø Ø Trauma Care

Ø Ø Burns

Ø Ø Injuries demanding surgical treatment

Ø Ø Poisoning or exposure to toxic material

Specific demands raised or required

Ø Ø In most cases, orthopedic surgery and fractures need immediate attention.

Ø Ø Individuals trapped in the vehicles need to be rescued which at times calls for metal cutting devices.

Ø Ø Expertise of fire brigade and defence services may be essential when the accident involves vehicles carrying hazardous chemicals, toxic materials or explosives.

Ø Ø Divers may be required if the accident involves a vehicle falling off a bridge into water.

Ø Ø The police may require to cordon off the area.

Ø Ø Chemical accidents may generate a demand for treatment for burns and exposure to poisonous substances which may mean a specialised service not generally available along the highways.

Ø Ø Nature of injuries may demand immediate transfer of injured to centres offering trauma care.

Ø Ø Loss of life, property and goods may require damage assessment procedures to avoid litigations and delays in gratuitous relief and compensation including insurance.

Damage caused

Ø Ø Vehicles

Ø Ø Goods


Specific demands raised or required

Ø Ø Salvaging the goods from the accident site needs clearance from technical personnel to ensure safety of persons engaged.

Environmental Effects

Ø Ø Air pollution if vehicle carrying hazardous chemicals are involved

Disruption of services

Ø Ø Road network

Ø Ø Traffic

Specific demands raised or required

Ø Ø The spills from vehicles carrying hazardous materials may require stoppage of traffic and cleaning of road surface. Various materials are recommended depending on the nature of spill. Also, specialised agencies may have to be called for undertaking spill cleaning operations.

Ø Ø Diversion of traffic resulting from such accidents may require traffic control to give information at various entry points located also far away (which need quick identification) from the site of accident so as to avoid inconvenience to the travellers.

Ø Ø Special cranes may be required for clearing the accident site.

Economic and Social consequences

Ø Ø Law and order problem

Specific demands raised or required

Ø Ø Security of goods and materials in the vehicles involved in the accident needs protection. The details of goods need to be officially recorded.

Secondary Effects

Ø Ø Fires

Ø Ø Gas leak affecting settlements near the accident site

Specific demands raised or required

Ø Ø It may be necessary to inform the settlements around to take necessary precautionary measures, if the accident involves leakage of toxic gases.

Ø Ø It may be advisable to send a team of medical personnel from poison centres to visit the settlements around the accident site when toxic leak is reported.

Fires

Lead Agencies

Ø Ø The main agencies involved in disaster management are the revenue department, local fire service (municipality or municipal corporation), medical services (hospitals) and police (local police station),

Ø Ø In the event of a major fire, the local fire service would need to co-ordinate with the MSEB and the water supply department for assistance in containment of the fire.

Ø Ø Major evacuation may call for support from DCR.

Possible Impacts

Effects on Individuals

Ø Ø Burns

Ø Ø Injuries demanding surgical treatment

Ø Ø Loss of Life


Specific demands raised or required

Ø Ø Serious burn cases may need immediate transport for admission to burn wards in the hospital

Ø Ø In many cases, panic behaviour may lead to injuries requiring treatment for orthopedic surgery and fractures.

Ø Ø Expertise of fire brigade may be essential in the rescue operations and control of fire particularly when population density is very high.

Ø Ø In case of separation of family members information counters would play an important role. (This is normally observed in case of fires in large slums)

Ø Ø In case of family disruption resulting from death of major earner, economic rehabilitation of the family may have to be planned as a long-term strategy.

Ø Ø Loss of life, property and livestock may require damage assessment procedures to avoid litigations and delays in gratuitous relief and compensation.

Damage caused

Ø Ø House

Ø Ø Personal Belongings

Specific demands raised or required

Ø Ø Partially damaged houses needs technical inspection to decide the habitation worthiness and the extent of repairs required.

Ø Ø Certain partially damaged houses may require demolition.

Ø Ø Transit arrangements may have to be identified when the structure needs reconstruction.

Ø Ø Salvaging personal belongings from the debris needs clearance from technical personnel to ensure safety of persons engaged.

Ø Ø As far as possible, family members only should be permitted to salvage their individual family belongings.

Damage to infrastructure and disruption of services

Ø Ø Buildings

Ø Ø Overhead lines

Ø Ø Communication Lines

Specific demands raised or required

Ø Ø Care needs to be taken to ensure that all electrical supplies to damaged area are disconnected promptly by MSEB officials in the area.

Ø Ø Underground cables need thorough inspection before power is restored.

Ø Ø Extensive damage to residential buildings resulting in disruption of telecommunication facilities requires provision of public telephones (PCO) to facilitate communication.

Ø Ø Damage to hospital, school buildings and other public facilities may disrupt the services. In such a case restoration of services through temporary arrangements is the first priority.

Ø Ø PWD may have to take repairs or reconstruction of such public facilities on a priority basis.

Ø Ø Some fires may demand traffic control measures including identification of alternate routes and diversion of traffic.

Ø Ø In congested areas controlling curious onlookers may block movement of rescue and fire workers. The police will need to cordon off the area for smooth operations.

Economic consequences

Ø Ø Loss of livelihood

Ø Ø disruption of market

Ø Ø loss in production

Specific demands raised or required

In addition to immediate relief requirements for effective and early recovery process,

Ø Ø restoration of markets, production units, employment avenues

Ø Ø Provision of damage assessment

Industrial and Chemical Accidents

Planning Assumptions

Ø Ø Off-site industrial accidents are in the form of fires, explosions and toxic gas leaks.

Ø Ø The responsibility of declaring an industrial accident as off-site rests with the management of the industrial unit where the accident has occurred.

Ø Ø The most crucial decision in off-site industrial accident management is the recognition / identification of the stage at which the responsibility is handed over from the management to the public authorities.

Ø Ø The public authority will be the District Collector when the disaster is likely to impact a larger area.

Lead Agencies

The main participating agencies in the management of off-site industrial disasters are :

Ø Ø revenue

Ø Ø police, fire, medical services

Ø Ø civil defence agencies

Ø Ø public works department

Ø Ø Industry

Ø Ø MARG

Ø Ø Public Health and regulatory environmental agencies.

Ø Ø To enable effective immediate response, specialists are required to

¨ ¨ provide fast, reliable information on the properties of the substance released,

¨ ¨ its potential hazard,

¨ ¨ protective equipment required,

¨ ¨ containment and control measures to be taken and

¨ ¨ advice on the decontamination and emergency termination activities required.

Possible Impacts

Effects on Individual

Ø Ø Loss of Life

Ø Ø Burns

Ø Ø Injuries demanding Surgical treatment

Ø Ø Exposure to toxic material

Specific demands raised or required

Ø Ø In most cases, orthopedic surgery and fractures need immediate attention.

Ø Ø Expertise of fire brigade, mutual aid and response groups (MARG), may be essential.

Ø Ø The police may require to cordon off the area.

Ø Ø Chemical accidents may generate a demand for treatment for burns and exposure to poisonous substances which may mean a specialised service not generally available with medical practitioners.

Ø Ø Nature of injuries may demand immediate transfer of injured to poison centres.

Ø Ø Loss of life, property and goods may require damage assessment procedures to avoid litigations and delays in gratuitous relief and compensation including insurance.

Ø Ø Areas indicating spread of toxic gases should be declared out of bounds and strict vigil should be kept by police to prohibit trespassing.

Ø Ø Alteration in wind direction when it covers a settlement create immediate demands for evacuation and relief till such time that an all-clear signal is given.

Environmental Effects

Ø Ø water pollution

Ø Ø air pollution

Ø Ø effect on vegetation

Specific demands raised or required

Ø Ø On a long-term basis monitoring of air, water and soil quality will have to be carried out.

Disruption of services

Ø Ø Road network

Ø Ø Electricity

Ø Ø Water supply

Economic and Social consequences

Ø Ø Loss of livelihood

Ø Ø Disruption of market

Ø Ø Damage to food stocks

Ø Ø Loss in production

Ø Ø Migration

Ø Ø Law and order problem

Ø Ø Social and Psychological effects

Specific demands raised or required

In addition to immediate relief requirements for effective and early recovery process and checking migration

Ø Ø restoration of production units, employment avenues

Ø Ø provision of individual counselling and community counselling

Ø Ø For combating depression, engage people in all possible activities related to relief and rehabilitation through a deliberate strategy of community participation.

Cyclones

Planning Assumptions

Ø Cyclones can be predicted sufficiently in advance but its impact location over land is uncertain.

Ø Ø The resource requirements for management of cyclone impact is extremely intensive involving large scale mobilization of resources.

Lead Agencies

Ø Ø The lead agencies are the Fire, Police and Health departments.

Ø Ø Extensive damage to infrastructure and public utilities is possible hence the role of supporting agencies such as MSEB, Telecommunications and PWD is crucial.

Ø Ø The loss to crop or plantation demands involvement of Agriculture Department

Ø Ø Loss of cattle will bring in the role for Animal Husbandry.

Ø Ø The assistance and intervention of the EOC is essential to support the district administration in the management of these disasters.

Ø Ø Additionally, secondary disasters such as epidemics may be caused due to floods resulting from cyclones and must be monitored by Public Health Department.

Possible Impacts

Effects on Individual

Ø Ø Loss of Life

Ø Ø Injuries demanding surgical needs

Ø Ø Family disorganisation

Specific demands raised or required

Ø Ø In most cases, orthopedic surgery, fractures, cuts and bruises need immediate attention.

Ø Ø Mass immunisation is necessary to protect individuals from water-borne diseases.

Ø Ø Marooned individuals, including those trapped on tree-tops and building terraces (in case of tidal wave) need to be located and rescued which calls for boats, or at times helicopter services.

Ø Ø Alternatively when large sections of community are marooned instead of evacuation it

may be necessary to organise dispatch of relief supplies to marooned locations. This

creates a special need for transport facility.

Ø Ø Expertise of fire brigade and defence services (Navy, Coast Guards) may be essential in

the rescue operations.

Damage caused

[Cyclones may be accompanied by heavy rains, or at times tidal waves].

Ø Ø Houses

Ø Ø Personal Belongings

Ø Ø Livestock

Ø Ø Crops and Plantations

Ø Ø Forests

Specific demands raised or required

Ø Ø Partially damaged houses needs technical inspection to decide the habitation worthiness

and the extent of repairs required.

Ø Ø Certain partially damaged houses may require demolition.

Ø Ø New sites for resettlement may have to be identified when removal of rubble and debris is non-viable.

Ø Ø Salvaging personal belongings from the debris needs clearance from technical personnel to ensure safety of persons engaged.

Ø Ø As far as possible, family members only should be permitted to salvage their individual family belongings.

Damage to infrastructure and disruption in services

Ø Ø Buildings

Ø Ø Godowns and storages

Ø Ø Dams

Ø Ø Bridges

Ø Ø Road Surface and Rail Lines

Ø Ø Power Stations and Power Lines

Ø Ø Water Tanks

Ø Ø Ports and Jetties

Ø Ø Communication Lines

Ø Ø Railway Signals

Specific demands raised or required

Ø Ø Care needs to be taken to ensure that all electrical supplies to damaged area are

disconnected promptly by MSEB.

Ø Ø Overhead lines need thorough inspection before power is restored.

Ø Ø Breaches or cracks in the dam need Irrigation Department to secure the breaches or

grouting the cracks.

Ø Ø In case of damage to bridges, relief operations may require temporary bridges which

can be put up with the assistance of army.

Ø Ø Certain roads needing resurfacing will need immediate action from PWD.

Ø Ø MWSSB in consultations with health authorities should restore existing water supply

with necessary repairs. This may call for replacement of pipelines or arrangements for

storage in portable PVC water tanks.

Ø Ø In some cases, restoration of existing water supply may be time-consuming and

therefore water tankers may have to be pressed into service.

Ø Ø Identification of nearby water sources and checking the potability of the same may also

be required.

Ø Ø Choking of sewer lines is one of the most ticklish issue. Immediate arrangements for

clearing the sewer lines is necessary.

Ø Ø Piped gas supply should be immediately terminated in the affected area to avoid

secondary consequences. If necessary, and feasible gas cylinders should be supplied till

the gas line is checked thoroughly and restored.

Ø Ø Extensive damage to residential buildings resulting in disruption of telecommunication

facilities requires provision of public telephones (PCO) to facilitate communication.

Ø Ø Damage to hospital, school buildings and other public facilities may disrupt the services.

Ø Ø In such a case restoration of services through temporary arrangements is the first

Ø Ø priority.

Ø Ø PWD may have to take repairs or reconstruction of such public facilities on a priority

basis.

Ø Ø Disposal of damaged foodgrains is one of the major step and needs community

cooperation.

Ø Ø Provision for distribution of cooked food or dry rations may have to be made.

Ø Ø Rains also have implication for storage of food, fuel for cooking (firewood or coal) and

fodder for the cattle. Protective structures therefore for the storage of all relief material

becomes essential. Plastic materials and water-proof containers are required.

Environmental Effects

Ø Ø soil erosion

Ø Ø silting

Ø Ø water pollution

Ø Ø increase in salinity

Specific demands raised or required

Ø Ø Silting in residential areas and buildings is one of the major problems requiring extensive

community involvement.

Ø Ø NGOs have demonstrated a tremendous capacity to mobilise community participation in

desalting operations for reoccupancy of the residences and also the wells providing

drinking water.

Ø Ø Agriculture department may have to undertake soil-testing and propose appropriate

measures for restoration of agriculture land.

Economic and Social consequences

Ø Ø Loss of livelihood

Ø Ø Disruption of market and Loss in production

Ø Ø Disruption of social structure including breakdown of social order

Ø Ø and community organisations

Ø Ø Migration

Ø Ø Law and order problem

Ø Ø Psychological after-effects

Specific demands raised or required

Ø Ø In addition to immediate relief requirements, for effective and early recovery process and checking migration

Ø Ø restoration of production units and employment avenues

Ø Ø provision of individual counselling and community counselling

Ø Ø Reconstruction of social structures and organisation of community requires a professional

intervention which can best come from non-governmental organisations Voluntary

agencies will have to be invited or coopted for relief activities to ensure this aspect.

Ø Ø For combating depression, engage people in all possible activities related to relief and rehabilitation through a deliberate strategy of community participation.

Secondary effects

Ø Ø Epidemics

Ø Ø Landslides

Specific demands raised or required

Ø Ø Rescue and relief teams must be alert to the possibility of outbreak of epidemics and therefore ensure standards of services with respect to storage, cooking, and handling of food materials as also disposal of waste in relief camps, medical centres and feeding centres.

Ø Ø Water-quality monitoring mechanisms will have to be set-up to prevent outbreak of epidemics.

Ø Ø Damage to road access due to landslides needs immediate clearing and PWD has to keep itself prepared for such an eventuality.

Ø Ø Settlements on the hill-slope prone to landslides need to be shifted to safer places.

Non-governmental Organisations (NGOs) and Voluntary Agencies

The non-governmental organisations and voluntary agencies play an important role in disaster management and provide a strong band of committed volunteers with experience in managing the disasters. Their strength lies in the choice of their manpower, the informality in operations and flexibility in procedures. These organisations enjoy a fair degree of autonomy and hence can respond to changing needs immediately.

The NGOs can be assigned specific locations and roles by the District Collector to undertake relief work within the overall institutional framework. The list of NGOs in Gadchiroli district with their specific nature of work, and specific roles of NGOs during disaster management is given in the following section. These NGOs would work in close co-ordination with the district administration and maintain the standards of services, information exchange and reporting requirements so as to enable the Collector to have a total picture of resource availability, disbursements and requirements. As and where possible, NGOs may also be able to improve the quality of delivery of welfare services in the camps organised and manned by administration.

List of NGOs and specific assistance available from them

Sr.No

Specific Operation During Disaster Management

Name if NGO which can be involved in these operations.

1

Search and Rescue

NSS volunteers of Shri Shivahi College Gadchiroli. And Home guards knowing swimming and diving.

2

Medical Aid

1)      1)      Indian Medical Association. Br. Gadchiroli.

2)      2)      Mission Hospital  Ghot and Sironcha.

3)      3)      Drug leader Association

3

Disposal of Dead (Human)(Retrival of Bodies ,Panchanama,Autopsy)

Sweepers of Nagar Parishad, Gadchiroli, Desaiganj and Chandrapur and also the Safai Kamgars of Big Gram Panchayats.

4

Temporary Shelter.

1)      1)      In Private Colleges/Schools/Hospitals.

Temporary Shelter are constructed by PWD

5

Carcass Disposal  (Animal)

Charmakar Individuals and Co-operative bodies and Staff of local bodies.

6

Relief Activities.

1)      1)      Cooked Food

 

 

2)      2)      Water

 

3)      3)      Gratuitous Relief

1. Halwai Hotel Association of concern Talukas

2. Mahila and Yuvak Mandals.

3. Achari Sanghatana and Hostels.

4. Volunteers of NSS and NCC / College /       

    School Students and local residents.

5. Revenue Deptt. Assisted by Local Voluntary

   Groups.

7

Health and Sanitation

Indian Medical Association branches at District and Taluka places , Private medical practitioners, Private  Medical Trust, NSS and NCC units.

8

Cattle Camps

Dugdha Co-operative Societies, Jungle Kamgars Societies, Vyapari Association, Merchant Association.

Other Ngo’s In Field of Voluntary Social Services in Gadchiroli District

Sr.No.

Taluka

Voluntary Social Service

Manpower/other facilities.

1

Gadchiroli

Shivaji Education Society ,Gadchiroli

50 Volunteers,

Food and Clothing.

2

Gadchiroli.

Dandkaranya Bahu-uudeshiya Sanstha.

As above

3

Gadchiroli

Platinum jubilee (Ismail Khoja )convent school Gadchiroli.

Manpower.food and clothing,medical aid.

4

Gadchiroli

Rice Mill Owners Association ,Gadchiroli.

Food ,clothing ,rescue volunteers.

5

Gadchiroli

Zilla Jungle Kamgar Sahakari Society Gadchiroli.

As above.

6

Aheri

Raje Vishweshrao Education and Social Society,  Aheri.

Manpowe,food ,clothing.

7

Gadchiroli

Bahu-udeshiya Krida Prabodhini Complex Gadchiroli.

Manpower and food.


Encouraging Community Preparedness

Disasters may result in cutting off essential services and in spite of administrative preparedness it may not be possible for the administration to reach out immediately.

Mitigation efforts and preparation of the disaster management action plan for local areas are essential elements and pre-requisites. Preparedness to a large extent would reduce the impact and the damage. Training and simulation exercises for enhancing the community’s preparedness and response capability will simultaneously strengthen and enhance the capacity of the administration to undertake necessary preparedness or evacuation measures. The district administration should encourage and support initiatives towards community preparedness measures including formation of Community Emergency Response Teams (CERTs).

Apart from the NGOs mentioned earlier, the following Private Sector units, Mahila Mandals and CBOs can serve as resource groups for involvement in community preparedness measures. They will all undergo training for the same. These Private Sector units, Mahila Mandals, CBOs, NGOs would adopt a conscious effort towards community level preparedness measures. They would also promote the formation of CERTs.

As a part of general preparedness at community level, the families in the community would be made conscious about the type of hazard that the household situation presents and the threats from outside. Also, communities would be encouraged to undertake exercises in risk and vulnerability analysis and preparation of community response plan to possible disasters. Thus local disaster management action plans for hot-spot areas in the context of specific vulnerability would be developed. For areas with high concentration of industries MARGs should be set-up, whereas for areas prone to other types of disasters Community Emergency Response Teams (CERTs) should be set-up.

Private Sector Units in Gadchiroli District

· · Kapada Merchant Association , Gadchiroli.

· · Kirana Merchant Association, Gadchiroli.

· · Ismail Khoja Association, Gadchiroli.

· · Medical Stores Association, Gadchiroli.

List of CBOs (Mahila Mandals and Yuvak Mandals) who will work towards community preparedness measures

Sr. No.

Name of Mahila Mandal / Yuvak Mandal.

Address

1

Jagruti Mahila Mandal.

 Gadchiroli.

2

Nalanda Mahila Shikshan Sanstha .

Gadchiroli

3

Lumbini Bahujan vikas Mahila Mandal.

Gadchiroli

4

Parvata Shikshan Sanstha.

Desaiganj (Wadsa)

5

Lok Mangal Sanstha .

Ghot   Tq. Chamorshi.

6

Economical Development Centre of India.

Gadchiroli

7

Gramin Aadivasi Vikas Shikshan Sanstha.

Kurkheda

8

Gramin Utkarsha Vikas Sanstha .

Thanegaon

9

Panchasheel Navyuvak Mandal

Aambeshivani

10

Sun Moon Krida Mandal .

Porla  Tq. Gadchiroli

11

Samata Yuva Sanstha.

Gokul Nagar,Gadchiroli.

12

Siddhartha Yuvak Mandal .

Sakhara, Tq. Gadchiroli

13

Jagruti Yuvak Mandal.

Yeoli, Tq. Gadchiroli.

14

Shri Ganesh Yuvak Mandal

Tembha, Tq. Gadchiroli.

15

Sangharsha Yuvak Mandal

Deshpur, Tq. Aarmori

16

Azad Sanskrutik Krida and Samaj Sewa Yuvak Mandal.

Kitali, Tq. Aarmori

17

Utsahi Yuvak Mandal

Chaudampalli, Tq. Aarmori

18

Mahatma Jyotiba Phule Yuvak Mandal

Jambjiri, Tq. Chamorshi.

19

Bahu –Uudeshiya Krida Prabodhini

Complex, Gadchiroli

20

Jai Bajrang Yuvak Mandal

Sakhara, Tq. Dhanora

21

Yuva Mitra Mandal.

Gurnoli, Tq. Kurkheda

22

Navyuvak Ekta Yuvak Mandal.

Gewardha, Tq. Kurkheda

23

Bahu-uudeshiya Yuvak Krida Mandal

Purada, Tq.Kurkheda

24

Shri Gurudeo Sewa Mandal,

Ghati post.Kadholi,Tq. Kurkheda.

25

Awahan Krida and Sanskrutik Yuva Mandal.

Aambeshioni,Tq. Gadchiroli

26

Aadivasi Gramin  Karyakarta Yuvak Mandal

Wasegaon  Tq. Gadchiroli

28

Samata  Yuvak Mandal .

Sakhara, Tq. Gadchiroli

29

Dr. Ambedkar  Yuvak Mandal

Maroda, Tq. Gadchiroli

30

Siddhartha Yuvak Mandal.

Maroda, Tq. Gadchiroli

31

Indira Gramvikas Sewa Mandal.

Yeoli, Tq. Gadchiroli

32

Rajiv Yuvak Mandal .

Kotgal, Tq. Gadchiroli.


Mutual Aid and Resource Groups (MARGs)

There is no major hazardous factory in Gadchiroli District.

However, there is significant transport of hazardous chemicals along the national and state highways passing through the district. There is need for setting up Mutual Aid and Response Groups wherever these highways pass close to densely populated localities/villages/wadis.

The objective of setting up MARGs in these areas are

· · Make the industrial zone self-sufficient

· · Encourage pooling of resources to tackle industrial accidents

· · Manage both on-site and off-site industrial accidents

· · Provide for a degree of expertise in managing disasters

· · Reduce the response time for managing disasters

· · To integrate the on-site plan of industries with an off-site plan.

· · Assist the district administration in managing disasters

Guidelines for the formation of MARGs are given in Annexure I.

Community Emergency Response Teams (CERTs)

In most disasters, community members are the first to respond before any outside assistance can reach the disaster site. Therefore in certain disaster prone areas a group of young volunteers or Community Emergency Response Teams are being formed and trained to undertake essential tasks which would reduce loss of life and property and at the same time build confidence in self-management. Essentially CERTs would contribute in the following areas:

1. 1. Organising training and preparedness exercises at the community level

2. 2. Ensuring family preparedness on the receipt of warning

3. 3. Ensuring communication links both within the community and with administration

4. 4. Controlling rumours and panic behaviour and undertaking confidence building activities

5. 5. Mobilising youth and able-bodied persons from the community to provide volunteers support, wherever required

6. 6. Organising local work teams for immediate rescue, and relief e.g. cooked food, first aid, assistance in law and order

7. 7. Assisting the handicapped who need special help

8. 8. Facilitating movement of relief teams during evacuation and relief and ensuring appropriate tagging as and when necessary

9. 9. Guarding major installations and evacuated properties till the administration takes over.

These CERTs are expected to support the efforts of the Gram Panchayat and Tahsildar.

Villages where CERTs can be formed

Gadchiroli district has a recurrent problem of floods. There are many flood prone villages along the major rivers and in almost all the tahsils – the list is given in Section III. Such “Community Emergency Response Teams” need to be formed in these flood prone villages.


Areas of Community Participation

Administration and NGOs at the disaster site should ensure maximum community participation in all stages of operation in order to maintain community morale and confidence, maximise the use of local resources, reduce costs of operation and promote a faster recovery. It is important to note that the so-called “victims” are not all that helpless and offer a tremendous manpower resource and ingenuity to overcome the crises. Disaster management situations offers a wide range of choice and demands a immediate decision making. The participation of communities and their representatives would reduce the pressures on administration with regard to the choice and uncertainties of community’s response to the decision-making process.

Based on local dynamics, ethos and the experience of the Latur earthquake, an appropriate strategy to ensure community support has been evolved. Such efforts to enlist community support and participation have gone a long way in reassuring the community about the administration’s intent and seriousness about managing the disaster.

Efforts to enlist community participation is being ensured by

identifying situational, opinion and position leaders in the community and voicing administration’s confidence in their capabilities to undertake the tasks.

Consultations and dialogues expressly indicating the need for assistance would encourage the community and its leaders to come forward.

Regular feedback meetings and an open book approach to demonstrate transparency.

Involving community in decision making at local levels

The major areas of community participation are being identified and include the following :

During Evacuation

For appropriate security and law and order evacuation would be undertaken with assistance from community leaders and community based organisations (CBOs).

The entire family would evacuate together as a unit. However, to avoid stampede and confusion and in cases of inadequate transport or limited time, emergency evacuation would be undertaken in the following order :

· · seriously injured and sick

· · children, women and handicapped

· · Old

· · Able-bodied

For emergency evacuations , the families would be encouraged to take along water, food, clothing and emergency supplies to last at least three days.

In addition, the families would be encouraged to assemble the following kit.

· · Adeqaute supply of water in closed, unbreakable containers.

· · Adequate supply of non-perishable packaged food and dry rations

· · A change of clothing and rain gear.

· · Blankets and bedsheets, towels

· · Buckets, Plates and mugs made of plastic

· · Soap, toothbrushes, toothpaste

· · A battery-powered radio, torch, lantern, matches

· · Cash and jewellery

· · Personal medicines

· · A list of important family documents including ration card, passport, bank passbook address/telephone book (of relatives), certificates, driving licence, property documents, insurance documents etc.

· · Special items including foods, for infants, elderly or disabled family members.

People would be asked to shut off electricity and water at main switches and valves before leaving.

People would be asked to listen to a battery-powered radio and follow local instructions.

In other cases, people would be advised to follow these steps:

· · Wear protective clothing.

· · Secure their homes. Close and lock doors and windows.

· · Turn off the main water valve and electricity

· · Leave early enough to avoid being trapped.

· · Follow recommended evacuation routes. Not to take shortcuts. They may be blocked.

· · Not to move into flooded areas.

· · Stay away from downed power lines.

· · Animals may not be allowed in public shelters. With respect to livestock, community would be instructed to set the livestock free before evacuating in order to avoid extensive loss of livestock. If possible, the community may be advised to carry the livestock along if the evacuation does not involve transportation by vehicles.


During the Disaster

Community leaders would be responsible for ensuring the following community behaviour :

· · People stay calm and panic behaviour is not encouraged. Regulate helter-skelter running or crowding of people.

· · Encourage people to stay at a secured place and protect themselves from injuries.

· · People do not enter damaged buildings or structures or even their own houses

· · People do not touch electric poles, utility wires/cables

· · People do not use telephones except in life-threatening situations

· · Preparedness of community for recurrence of the disaster, increase in severity, or consequential emergencies

· · Check for injuries. Do not attempt to move seriously injured persons unless they are in immediate danger of death or further injury.

· · Undertake first-aid activities as per the guidelines given in preparedness and mitigation document of DDMAP

· · Visually inspect utility lines and appliances for damage.

· · If water pipes are damaged, shut off the water supply at the main valve.

· · People stay away from damaged areas, unless their assistance has been specifically requested by police, fire or relief organizations.

· · Mobilise people to put out small fires and people inside are made to evacuate.

· · People do not throw away any damaged goods until an official inventory has been taken.

· · Help police, if requested, to maintain law and order and watch the evacuated property during the disaster

During Relief and Rehabilitation

Immediately after the disaster, the members of the community may look depressed and helpless, but very soon gets euphoric when they find that after all everything is not lost. Participation of community at this stage helps in early recovery and promotes mental health. It is necessary to see that member of the community are continuously engaged in some sort of helping activity to draw them out of their depression.

Relief authorities at the site would therefore:

· · Encourage self-help in every activity of their day-to-day living.

· · Encourage assistance for location and identification of dead, disposal of dead bodies, disposal of carcasses and disposal of damaged food stocks

· · Encourage contribution of labour (loading, unloading, distribution, temporary constructions, salvage and restoration of water supplies, Food distribution, relief camps, cattle camps etc.)

· · Enlist assistance for updating records of damages and losses.

· · Enlist assistance in maintenance of law and order

· · Enlist assistance in maintaining sanitation standards and disposal of waste

· · Promote cultural and recreational activities in order to protect the mental health and sustain the ethical and moral values.


Encouraging Family Level Preparedness

In order to assist the families to prepare themselves, community education programme will be undertaken to acquaint members of the community with the nature of each disaster, the type of damage that can occur, the demands it would generate both at family and community level and the manner in which it will be responded to. Even with the best of planning, it is difficult to assess the exact impact of the disaster and the response time. Under the circumstances then, families have to prepare themselves for a prolonged period before the administration can reach them. Although collective efforts of the community can reduce the hardship to some extent a large part of the burden would be on the family itself. Hence families would be encouraged to check for the in-house hazards as also use the given emergency checklist and prepare itself accordingly.

Checking for in-house hazards

· · Encourage people to inspect their houses once every year to find and correct potential hazards such as any household items that can move, fall, break, or cause a fire.

· · Check for electrical hazards.

¨ ¨ Undertake repairs or replacement of hazardous cables, plugs, connections.

¨ ¨ Remove unwanted plug points or unused cables.

· · Check for combustible materials in the household

¨ ¨ Appropriateness of storage place (light, ventilation, heat and reach of children)

¨ ¨ Appropriateness of containers of flammable liquids such as kerosone/diesel (quality of material, quantity of material, covers, leakages)

¨ ¨ Precautions undertaken for managing the spills

· · Check for fire hazards.

¨ ¨ Separation of household goods from inflammable materials

¨ ¨ Separation of fuel from combustible materials

¨ ¨ Cleaning of valves, pressure stoves and supply points

Emergency Planning and Checklists

Families need to prepare themselves for any kind of disaster. This would require specific information about emergency water and food and a recommended checklist of emergency supplies which will enable the family to sustain itself till adequate facilities for relief are organised.

Emergency checklist:

· · Find out which disasters could occur in the area.

· · Ask how to prepare for each disaster.

· · Know the members of the CERT

· · Ask how warnings are given in an emergency.

· · Learn about the community's evacuation routes.

· · Learn about designated shelters

· · Ask about special assistance for elderly or disabled persons.

· · Learn about emergency plans at the workplace.

· · Learn about emergency plans for the children’s school or day-care center.

Create an emergency plan:

· · Meet with household members. Discuss with children the dangers of fire, severe weather, earthquakes and other emergencies.

· · Discuss how to respond to each disaster that could occur.

· · Talk to children about the likely disasters

· · It is easier for children to understand what is happening during a disaster if they already know what can take place. Point out that some of the disasters are indeed natural events and although they are dangerous, they do not have to be life-threatening if adequate precautions are taken. Try not to alarm the children in discussing possible disasters.

· · Teach children about the safety precautions for each disaster.

· · Learn how to turn off the water and electricity at main switches.

· · Create a network of relatives, friends or co-workers to assist the disabled in an emergency.

· · Provide for medical alert tags or bracelets to identify the handicapped person

Disaster supplies kit

· · For emergency evacuations , the families should be encouraged to take along adequate supply of water, food, clothing and emergency supplies.

· · The families should be encouraged to assemble the disaster supplies kit as described earlier.


Evacuation Preparedness

When community evacuations become necessary, local officials would provide information to the public through the media. Government agencies, and other disaster relief organisations would provide emergency shelter and supplies.

The amount of time the families have to evacuate will depend on the disaster. If the event can be monitored, like a cyclone, families could have a day or two to get ready. But many disasters offer no time for people to gather even the most basic necessities. This is why evacuation plan is necessary.

The checklist for emergency planning given above would be useful for evacuation planning as well. Additionally, families should also get their disaster supplies kit organised for evacuation and follow the steps for evacuation as outlined earlier.

Shelter

Taking shelter is critical in times of disaster. This may mean staying in an enclosed structure during a severe storm without electricity for days.

In many emergencies, local authorities would set up public shelters in schools, municipal buildings and places of worship. While they often provide water, food, medicine and basic sanitary facilities, families should plan to have their own supplies as well.

Living in Designated Emergency Shelters

1. 1. Stay in the shelter until local authorities say it's okay to leave. The length of the stay can range from a few hours to few days.

2. 2. Restrict smoking to well-ventilated areas. Ensure that smoking materials are disposed of safely.

3. 3. Cooperate with local authorities and others staying in the shelter. Living with many families in a confined space can be difficult and unpleasant.

4. 4. Listen to radio broadcasts.

5. 5. Watch for fires.

6. 6. Assist local authorities as volunteers in the management of water, cooked food and other relief supplies including medical care, if required

7. 7. Make arrangements for pets and cattle before going to a public shelter. They are not allowed in a public shelter due to health reasons.

8. 8. Organise recreation for children

9. 9. Assist local authorities with the assistance of community members to maintain law and order

Helping after Disaster

When disaster strikes, people everywhere want to help those in need. To ensure that this compassion and generosity are put to good use, the media can highlight these facts:

· · Financial aid is an immediate need of disaster victims. Financial contributions should be made through local administration or a well-known voluntary organisation to help ensure that contributions are put to their intended use.

· · Before donating food or clothing, wait for instructions from local officials. Immediately after a disaster, relief workers usually don't have time or facilities to set-up distribution channels, and too often these items go to waste.

· · Volunteers should go through a well-known voluntary agency since these agencies will know what is needed and are prepared to deal with the need. Local authorities also coordinate volunteer efforts for helping in disasters.

· · Organisations and community groups wishing to donate items should first contact local officials, and voluntary agencies working on relief to find out what is needed and where to send it. Be prepared to deliver the items to different places, tell officials when you'll be there, but do not expect them to provide for transportation, driver, and unloading.


Disaster Specific Family Preparedness Measures

Fires

[In addition to what has been listed under family preparedness as a generic response, fire accidents demand specific preparedness and responses. Given below are the preparedness measures and responses which are specific to fire accidents].

Fire spreads quickly; there is no time to grab valuables or inform administration. Heat and smoke are even more dangerous than the flames; inhaling the super-hot air can sear the lungs. Fire produces poisonous gases that make you disoriented and drowsy. Instead of being awakened by a fire, it may induce a deeper sleep.

In case of fire know what to do, how to escape, how to safeguard the occupants. Have a plan.

Fire safety tips

· · Teach family members to stay low to the floor (where the air is safer in a fire) when escaping from a fire.

What to do during a fire

· · Use water to put out small fires. Do not try to put out a fire that is getting out of control. Call the fire department. Make sure everyone knows how to call the fire department.

· · Never use water on an electrical fire.

· · Smother oil and grease fires in the kitchen with baking soda or salt, or put a lid over the flame if it is burning in a pan.

· · If the clothes catch on fire, the person should stop, drop and roll until the fire is extinguished. Running only makes the fire burn faster. Those assisting should pour water and not try to control it with bare hands.

· · Feel for heat near the top of the door before opening. If it's hot, don't open it unless it is an escape route. In such a case Feel the bottom of the door with the palm of your hand before opening it. If the door is cool, leave immediately. Be prepared to crawl. Smoke and heat rise, and the air is clearer and cooler near the floor. If the door is hot, escape through a window. If escape is not possible, signal and call out for help, alerting the fire fighters.

· · Close doors of the rooms on fire. It will hold back the fire and keep out poisonous smoke until help arrives.

· · If escape is not possible, stay near the floor, where the air is better. If all doors are closed, open a window for air. If possible, stuff wet rags around doors to hold back smoke and heat.

· · Stay out. Do not, for any reason, go back into a burning house. If someone is missing, tell the fire fighters.

What to do after a fire

· · Do not enter a fire-damaged structureunless authorities say it is okay.

· · When entering a fire-damaged structure, look for signs of heat or smoke.

· · Have an electrician check your household wiring before the current is turned on.

· · Beware of structural damage. Roofs and floors may be weakened and need repair.

· · Keep records of all clean-up and repair costs.

· · Do not throw away any damaged goods until an official inventory has been taken.

· · In case of tenancy, contact the landlord.

· · Secure personal belongings or move them to another location.

· · Discard food and medicines that have been exposed to heat, smoke or soot.

· · Do not try to open a safe or strong box. It can hold intense heat for several hours. If the door is opened before the box has cooled, the entering air combined with the high internal temperature can cause the contents to burst into flames.

· · If the local administration say the structure is unsafe and must be vacated :

¨ ¨ Ask local police or CERT volunteers to watch the property

¨ ¨ Take jewellery, cash, and financial records and other important documents.

¨ ¨ After vacating, notify the new residential address to friends, relatives, police and fire departments, delivery services, employers, schools and the post office


Earthquakes

[In addition to what has been listed under family preparedness as a generic response, earthquakes demand specific preparedness and responses. Given below are the preparedness measures and responses which are specific to earthquakes].

The actual movement of the ground in an earthquake is seldom the direct cause of death and injury. Most casualties result from falling objects and debris. Earthquakes also may trigger landslides and generate huge ocean waves, each of which can cause great damage. There are many actions which can be taken to reduce the dangers.

Preparing for an Earthquake

· · Prepare a home Earthquake plan

· · Choose a safe place in every room - under a sturdy table or desk or against an inside wall where nothing can fall on you.

· · Practice drop, cover, and hold on at least twice a year. Drop under a sturdy desk or table, hold on, and protect the eyes by pressing the face against the arm. If there is no table or desk nearby, sit on the floor against an interior wall away from windows or tall furniture that could fall on you.

· · Teach children to drop, cover, and hold on

During an Earthquake

· · Stay calm.

· · Inside, stand in a doorway or crouch under a desk or table, away from windows. Watch for falling objects. If in bed, hold on and stay there, protecting the head with a pillow. Drop, cover, and hold on

· · Outdoors, stand away from buildings, trees, telephone, and electrical lines.

· · On the road, drive away from subways, flyovers and bridges. Stop in safe area. Stay in vehicle.

After an Earthquake

· · Check for injuries. Provide first aid.

· · Check for water, sewage breaks and for downed electrical lines and short-circuits. Turn off appropriate utilities. Look for and extinguish small fires. Eliminate fire hazards.

· · Check for building damage and potential safety problems.

· · Clean up dangerous spills.

· · Turn on radio and listen for instructions from local authorities/police/fire brigade

· · Don't use the telephone except for emergencies.

· · Expect aftershocks. Each time you feel one, drop, cover, and hold on


Floods and Flash Floods

[In addition to what has been listed under family preparedness as a generic response, floods demand specific preparedness and responses. Given below are the preparedness measures and responses which are specific to floods].

Floods are the most common and widespread of all natural hazards. Some floods develop over a period of days, but flash floods can result in raging waters in just a few minutes. Flash floods carry rocks, mud and other debris and can occur without any visible sign of rainfall. Land slides are another danger created by flooding.

Before a Flood

· · Find out if the area is flood-prone from the local authorities.

· · Understand the flood levels and learn about the history of flooding in the community.

· · Learn flood warning signs and community alert signals and know the terms used to describe flooding.

During a Flood Watch

· · Listen to a battery-operated radio for the latest flood information. Fill buckets and other water containers with clean water in case water becomes contaminated.

· · Be aware of flash floods. Flash floods will rise faster and cut off the escape routes. If there is any possibility of a flash flood occurring, move immediately to higher ground. Do not wait for instructions to move.

· · Move valuable household possessions to the upper floors or to safe ground if time permits.

During a Flood

If Indoors:

· · Turn on battery-operated radio or television to get the latest emergency information.

· · Get your preassembled emergency supplies.

· · If told to leave, do so immediately.

If Outdoors:

· · Climb to high ground and stay there. Avoid walking through any floodwaters. If it is moving swiftly, even shallow water can sweep you off your feet.

· · Do not allow children to play in flood waters

If In A vehicle:

· · If travelling towards a flooded area, turn around and go another way.

· · If the vehicle stalls, abandon it immediately on the side of the road and climb to higher ground. Many deaths have resulted from attempts to move stalled vehicles.

· · If trapped in a vehicle that is going under water, get out of the submerged vehicle by opening a window or door and swimming to safety.

After a Flood

· · Flood dangers do not end when the water begins to recede. Listen to a radio or television and don't return home until authorities indicate it is safe to do so.

· · When entering buildings, use extreme caution.

· · Examine walls, floors, doors, and windows to make sure that the building is not in danger of collapsing.

· · Watch out for animals, especially poisonous snakes, that may have got into the house with the flood waters. Use a stick to poke through debris.

· · Watch for loose plaster and ceilings that could fall.

· · Throw away food that has come in contact with flood waters.

· · Remove water from the house to avoid structural damage.


Epidemics

[In addition to what has been listed under family preparedness as a generic response, epidemics demand specific preparedness and responses. Given below are the preparedness measures and responses which are specific to epidemics ].

Different epidemics will have different etymology and consequences. Water-borne, vector-borne or viral epidemics will need different levels of preparedness and response. Some epidemics may have a quick onset whereas others may take a longer time to spread. The public health department is primarily concerned with issuing the epidemic warning and declaring the areas as epidemic prone.

After the warning

· · Understand the specific nature of the epidemic including the causation, nature of spread, symptoms and medication

· · Understand the specific precautionary and preventive measures to be taken by the family members.

· · Ensure intake of safe water and food. Take extra measures to protect food stocks.

· · Receive all recommended vaccinations, inoculations and encourage the neighbours to help health authorities to prevent spread of epidemics

· · Avoid stockpiling preventive medicines at family level. This may create a severe shortage of essential drugs.

· · Take extra-care in disposal of family waste and also assist in community efforts in disposal of waste

· · Keep in constant touch with epidemic information and public health staff in the area

During the Epidemic

· · Report any symptoms to the health authorities immediately

· · Understand if there is a need for quarantine

· · Understand the nature of treatment and possible emergencies

· · Do not leave the epidemic area without a clearance from the health authorities

· · Report arrival of any guests from the epidemic area

· · Discourage relatives and friends from outside epidemic area to visit your areas

· · Understand the steps to be taken in the disposal of personnel belongings of the patient including disposal of excreta

· · Understand the procedure for disposal of the dead body of the epidemic victim

Road Accidents

[In addition to what has been listed under family preparedness as a generic response, road accidents demand specific preparedness and responses. Given below are the preparedness measures and responses which are specific to road accidents].

Road Accidents are a major killer and take place without any warning. Accidents may involve passenger vehicles, goods vehicles, vehicles carrying hazardous and toxic materials. The damage therefore may involve injuries and deaths, chemical spills, fires or release of toxic gases.

On accident event (involving passenger vehicle)

Those at the accident site should follow the following priorities

· · Look for and rescue the injured or those trapped in the vehicles

· · Arrange for transport of the injured to the nearest medical care centre

· · Place the dead bodies on one side to avoid obstructions

· · Organise locally traffic control using the available manpower to avoid traffic jams

· · Discourage people from crowding near the accident spot

· · Discourage people from looting the goods from the accident vehicle

· · Arrange to inform the nearest traffic police post through passing vehicles on either side

On accident event (involving hazardous and toxic elements)

· · Do not go anywhere near the accident spot unless the hazardous and toxic elements are properly understood and discourage others. The contents may explode or catch fire

· · Prevent people at the accident site from lighting of matches for cigarettes etc.

· · Discourage people from collecting the spills from the accident vehicle as the chemicals might be deceptive and lead to toxic exposure or explosions

· · Arrange to inform the nearest traffic police/fire brigade through passing vehicles

· · Identify the wind direction and move in the opposite direction

· · Do not allow any traffic congestion near the accident spot

· · Stop the traffic at a sufficient distance (at least half a kilometre) from the accident spot in all directions till the nature of chemicals is properly understood


Dissemination of DDMAP

In order for the DDMAP to be effective it would be disseminated at two levels ;

· · to the district authorities, government departments, NGOs and other agencies and institutions within the district and

· · to general public.

Effective dissemination of plan requires a well designed and focused training and awareness programmes. The responsibility for dissemination of the plan is vested with the District Disaster Manager, at the Collectorate, and training activities will be carried out under the guidance and direction of YASHADA, as well as through awareness programmes organised by each of the agencies participating in disaster management such as Irrigation Department organising warning and evacuation exercises or Fire Brigade demonstrating rescue operations. The District Disaster Manager would also involve NGOs in preparing suitable public awareness material to be distributed to the public. The specific NGOs to be involved in these exercises are given below.

List (Generlised) of NGOs who can be involved in Plan Dissemination

Sr.No.

Name of the NGO

1

Shivaji Education Society ,Gadchiroli

2

Dandkaranya Bahu-uudeshiya Sanstha.

3

Platinum jubilee (Ismail Khoja )convent school Gadchiroli.

4

Rice mill Association ,Gadchiroli.

5

Zilla jangal kamgar sahakari society Gadchiroli.

6

Raje Vishweshrao education and social society Aheri.

7

Bahu-uudeshiya krida prabodhini complex Gadchiroli.

8

NSS volunteers of Shri Shivahi College Gadchiroli. And Home guards knowing swimming and diving.

9

Indian Medical Association. Br. Gadchiroli.

Mission Hospital  Ghot and Sironcha.

Drug leader Association

The training programmes will be organised for different levels of functionaries. The district level officials and identified NGOs, Private Sector organisations will receive the training at YASHADA under their Training of Trainers (TOT) programme in order to equip them to extend training facilities to functionaries at taluka and village level as well as organise simulation exercises within the community. Some of the select government training institutions at the district level will participate in such TOTs and undertake training programmes for government functionaries. Efforts will be therefore directed to decentralise training activity to the extent possible so as to enable YASHADA to serve as resource centre and provide training expertise to various groups.

The materials for awareness programmes at community level would be prepared in the local language to ensure widespread dissemination. Media would be extensively used for public awareness programmes. These will include

Þ Þ newspapers including local ones

Þ Þ TV

Þ Þ local cable networks

Þ Þ radio

Þ Þ folk media

Þ Þ publicity material

Schools, colleges and other public institutions would be specifically targetted.

In addition to dissemination of literature related to the DDMAP, disaster response drills should be conducted on a regular basis especially in the disaster prone areas to maintain the readiness of communities and departments as regards operational procedures, personnel and equipment and orderly response.

Local agencies such as fire, police and ambulance staff would be familiar with the disasters possible in an area. Mutual aid organizations and public emergency response organizations would be included in these drills

The objectives of full scale drill include evaluation of the following:

· · practicality of the plan (structure and organization)

· · adequacy of communications and interactions among agencies and the public

· · emergency equipment effectiveness

· · adequacy of first aid and rescue procedures

· · adequacy of emergency personnel response and training

· · public relations skills

· · evacuation and count procedures


Plan Evaluation

The purpose of evaluation of DDMAP is to determine

· · the adequacy of resources

· · coordination between various agencies

· · community participation

· · partnership with NGOs

The ease of understanding and using the plan will also be important considerations.

The plan will be updated when shortcomings are observed in

· · organizational structures

· · technological changes render information obsolete;

· · response mechanism following reports on drills or exercises;

· · assignments of state agencies.

Adaptation, improvisation and optimisation are corner stones of any planning pertaining to disasters. It must be emphasized that the Documents or Manuals prepared as disaster management plan have a limited purpose. These can at best serve as reminder of tasks and activities.

Individuals and agencies assigned specific responsibilities within this Plan will prepare appropriate supporting plans and related standard operating procedures, periodically review and update alerting procedures and resource listings, and maintain an acceptable level of preparedness.

The DDMAP would be evaluated by both the district and the state.

Post-Disaster Evaluation

A post-incident evaluation would be done after the withdrawal of relief and rehabilitation activities in order to assess

· · the nature of state intervention and support,

· · suitability of the organization structure,

· · institutional arrangements,

· · adequacy of Operating Procedures,

· · monitoring mechanisms,

· · information tools,

· · equipment,

· · communication system, etc.,

The impact studies on the above operations for long-term preventive and mitigation efforts are also to be undertaken.

At the community level, evaluation exercises may be undertaken to assess the reactions of the community members at various stages in the disaster management cycle and to understand their perceptions about disaster response in terms of

· · adequacy of training,

· · alert and warning systems,

· · control room functions,

· · communication plans,

· · security,

· · containment

· · recovery procedures,

· monitoring

Plan Update

The DDMAP is a “living document” and the Collector along with YASHADA will update it every year taking into consideration

· · the resource requirements,

· · updates on human resources

· · technology to be used

· · coordination issues

An annual conference for DMAP update will be organised by the Collector. All concerned departments and agencies would participate and give recommendations on specific issues.

The following guidelines would be adhered to while updating the DDMAP:

· · A procedure, would be in place to update the plan on a regular basis to ensure that the items requiring updation are considered and are current.

· · when an amendment is made to a plan, the amendment date would be noted on the updated page of the plan.

· · A senior official in every agency would be designated to ensure that all plan-holders are notified of changes as soon as possible. Plan-holders would be requested to verify that they have received the changes.

Annexure I: Guidelines for Formation of MARG

In areas where there is a concentration of hazardous industries, Mutual Aid and Response Groups can be organised to make the industrial zone to be self-sufficient to a fairly large extent and manage industrial accidents, both on-site and off-site.

The pre-requisite for setting up such a group are

1. 1. General information on industries, settlements and geo-physical and climatic data

2. 2. Zoning of the Industrial area with listing of industries in each zone

3. 3. Identification of lead industry and the group leader and assistant group leaders with their names, addresses and telephones, who would act as liaison persons

4. 4. Identification of technical experts in each zone with their names and addresses who would respond to the call for assistance

5. 5. Identification of potential hazards/toxic materials with the list containing physical and hazardous properties, procedures for responding spillage and leakage, cautions to be taken including emergency procedures, naturalisation procedures, protective equipments, emergency equipments, first-aid.

6. 6. List of hazardous chemicals and quantities stored by different industries

7. 7. Names, locations and telephone numbers of hospitals and poison centres

Guidelines For Seeking MARG Assistance

Preparation :

1. 1. All concerned industries should prepare an Onsite Emergency Control plan with following information.

· · Risk Analysis.

· · Safety and Environmental Audit

· · Worst case scenario.

· · List of inventories.

· · Hazard Identification

· · Material safety data sheets

· · Plant layout with escape routes

· · Demographic and geographic situation.

· · Location of Fire hydrants

· · Distances between the processes and facilities in plant and in immediate vicinity of plant be logged and determined in terms of time and distance.

· · Evacuation procedure

· · Emergency control organisation structure

· · Responsible personnel list with addresses and telephone numbers.

· · Available emergency control facilities.

2. 2. An effort has to be made to dovetail Onsite plan to Off-Site plan.

3. 3. Such plan should be available in the designated Emergency Control Centre of the factory, Directorate of Industrial Safety and Health, Fire Brigade, Police, District/Corporation Officials and Collector and should be updated periodically.

4. 4. Training sessions and mock drills in First Aid, Fire Fighting, Evacuation, First Responder. Regular testing of plants processes should be conducted to appraise and train different levels of employees in emergency control.

During An Emergency:

1. 1. During an emergency, assistance should be sought from the immediate neighbouring MARG Member/s enlisted zonewise having appropriate expertise as per the guidelines and equipments, gadgets for controlling situation and Statutory Authorities simultaneously.

2. 2. All the personnel in each factory who are responders for emergency must be made aware about the availability of such MARG assistance and methods of getting it.

3. 3. Assisting organisation must be properly briefed by the unit seeking the assistance about the nature of emergency, materials involved and meteorology conditions (Wind direction), precise nature of help required to ensure proper response.

4. 4. Assistance can be requested in the form of either equipment or expertise or both with expert operating personnel.

5. 5. In case of equipment received from assisting organisation

· · It must be properly used

· · Returned promptly

· · In case of damage it should be repaired from approved agency and returned in working condition.

· · Consumables should be replaced/reimbursed.

6. 6. When a MARG member is extending help to Non-MARG member or other organisation make sure that

· · appropriate equipment tested for the purpose is given.

· · if your personnel are attending the emergencies ensure that they are well versed and have worked under such a situation and are able to give guidance.

· · the situation and the materials involved are being briefed to you correctly.

· · The guidance about plants, processes and materials involved is available on the spot from the organisation receiving the assistance

7. 7. It is understood that in case of any accident to any personnel while assisting, organisation that is receiving help extend its co-operation in bearing a reasonable part of expenses, beyond that covered by an insurance policy.

8. 8. Following sequence of action is recommended while seeking help

· · First Deploy internal resources.

· · Inform civic Fire Brigade and get their assistance. Inform the Statutory Authorities, keep appropriate MARG member in your zone/neighbourhood alerted about the emergency.

· · If found necessary request help from the MARG member to control specific situation for which it has got equipment and expertise.

· · Convey clearly what you want, expertise, equipment or both and exact nature of need.

· · Keep other MARG member in your zone alerted to render any further assistance, if the situation so demands.

General:

· · Each organisation is primarily responsible for keeping its plants in safe conditions, identifying, assessing, minimising and eliminating hazards and risk, maintaining necessary equipment for special kinds of risks that the organisation might be facing and training its personnel for emergency response and control.

· · It may seek help from others in the MARG by way of equipment, expertise and special materials, but this is only complementary to its own arrangements and commitment to safety and emergency control.

· · Mutual Aid and Response is sought only when your own efforts seems to be inadequate to meet the demand of the situation and that of civic response group is either not adequate or enough.

FACILITIES, RESOURCES, AGENCIES WITH CONTACT ADDRESSES & TELEPHONE NUMBERS

Government Sector

FACILITIES AND RESOURCES AVAILABLE WITH REVENUE DEPARTMENT

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

­Sr. Facility Location Authority Incharge Alternate Authority

No. Resource Name, Designation, Name, Designation,

Address, Phone, Fax Address, Phone, Fax

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

1) District Gadchiroli Shri.Nitin Gadre Shri. Pradip Kalbhore

Collector Collector,Gadchiroli Addl.Collector

Gadchiroli 22201 Fax 22302 22617

Jeep : 05 , Car : 02 , Gypsy : 02 , Truck : 20

2) Sub Divisional Gadchiroli Shri.R.L.Shinde

Officer, S.D.O. Gadchiroli

Ph. 22235 Fax (07132) 22235

Jeep 75, Van Bus 3 , Jeeps 4, Matador 1, Car 9, Tipper 1, Trucks 22

3) Sub Divisional Wadsa Shri. Dange

Officer, S.D.O. Wadsa

Ph . 72371 Fax 72371

Jeep 30, Van Bus 3, Car 1, Matador 3, Trucks 11, Tippers 9, Tractor 1

4) Sub Divisional Aheri Shri. Tekam

Officer, S.D.O. Aheri

Ph. 7241 Fax 7241

Jeeps 64, Matador 1, Gypsy2, Tipper 5, Car 1, Tipper 1, Truck 51, Tractor 16


---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

RURAL DEVELOPMENT DEPARTMENT

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Sr. Facility Location Authority Incharge Alternate Authority

No. Resource Name, Designation, Name, Designation,

Address, Phone, Fax Address, Phone, Fax

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

1) Chief Gadchiroli Shri.Lokesh Chandra Shri.E.B. Aole

Executive C.E.O. Gadchiroli Dy. C.E.O. (G)

Officer Ph. 22304 22304

Fax 22343

Jeeps 30 , Water Tanker 02, Ambassador 05 , Truck 10 Road roller 01

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

HOME DEPARTMENT

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

1) Superintendent Gadchiroli Shri. Gupta Shri. Rathod

of Police D.S.P. Addl. S.P.

Ph. 22307 22326

Fax 22341

Jeep 97 Pickup Van 05, Gypsy 40, Motor Cycle 04, Car 01, Police Van 07,

Truck 01 Ambulance 01

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

1) Executive Gadchiroli Shri.V.B. Salve Shri. Soni

Engineer No.1 Exe. Eng. Asst. Eng.

(Nodal Officer Ph. 22415 Ph.22415

Gadchiroli Dist.)

Ambassador 01 Tractor 03 Jeep 06 Tanker 01 Truck 07

2) Executive Gadchiroli Shri D.G. Deshmukh

Engineer No.2

Gadchiroli Dist.

Ambassador 01 Tanker 01, Jeep 04 Tipper 01, Truck 05 Mobile Van 01

3) Executive Engineer, Shri R.M. Nimaje

Road Project,

Gadchiroli Dist.

Ambassador 01, Jeep 03

4) Executive Gadchiroli Shri D.K. Balpande

Engineer, P.W.D.

Allapalli, Dist.Gadchiroli

Ambesador 01 Tractor 01, Jeep 07 Tanker 04, Truck 11, Tipper 6, Mobile Van 01

5) Executive Gadchiroli Shri P.P. Sonkusare

Engineer, P.W.D. (Special Action Plan)

Allapalli, Dist.Gadchiroli

Ambassador 01 Tanker 01, Jeep 03 , Truck 04

OTHER DEPARTMENTS

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

­Sr. Facility Location Authority Incharge Alternate Authority

No. Resource Name, Designation, Name, Designation,

Address, Phone, Fax Address, Phone, Fax

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

1) Executive Gadchiroli Shri. Joshi Shri. Pandit

Engineer MSEB Exe. Eng. Asst. Eng.

(Nodal Officer)

Jeep 04 Matador 05 Truck 03

2) Sub.Div.Engineer Gadchiroli Shri.Gajbhiye

Telecom Office SDE, Ph. 22600

3) Project Officer Gadchiroli Smt. Abha Chandra Shri. Sarode

ITDP Project Officer, APO

(Nodal Officer) Ph. 22286 Ph. 22286

Gypsy 03, Jeep 03

4) Chief Officer Gadchiroli Shri. Sadavarte

Muncipal Council Chief Officer, Ph. 22379

Truck 01 Ambulance 01, Tractor 02 Fire Brigade 01, Water tanker 02

5) Chief Officer Wadsa Shri. Meshram

Muncipal Council Chief Officer, Ph. 7272

Truck 01 , Ambulance 01, Tractor 2, Fire Brigade 01, Water tanker 02

6) Dy.Conservator Gadchiroli Shri. Krishna Rao

Forest Office Dy. Conservator

Ph.22289

Truck 10 Gypsy 01, Jeep 10 Water 05, Tractor 15 Tanker

7) Dist. Commandant Gadchiroli Shri.Pathrabe

Home Guards Commandant Dy. Commandant

Ph. 22408

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Sr. Facility Location Authority Incharge Alternate Authority

No. Resource Name, Designation, Name, Designation,

Address, Phone, Fax Address, Phone, Fax

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

8) N.S.S. Officer Gadchiroli Smt. Thakare

Office Principal Shivaji

College, Gadchiroli, Ph. 22244

Vehicle - Nil

9) National Infor. Gadchiroli Shri. S.R.Tembhurne Shri.Antony Thomas

Centre Dist.Informatics DIA

Officer Ph. 32509

Ph. 32509

Venicle - Nil

10) Dist. Health Gadchiroli Shri.Kagdelwar Shri. Tuppalwar

Office DHO Dy. DHO

Ph. 22317 Ph. 22317

Jeep 56 Truck 01 Gypsy 02 Matador 01 Ambulance 01

11) Dist. Info. Gadchiroli Shri. P. Wasave

Office District Information Officer

Ph. 22294

Jeep 02 Matador 01

12) Civil Surgeon Gadchiroli Shri. Waghamare

Dist. Hospital Civil Surgeon, Ph. 22320, Fax 22320

Car 01 , Jeep 02 , Ambulance 02

13) Dist. Malaria Gadchiroli Shri. Meshram

Office District Malaria Officer, Ph. 22214

Jeep 02 Truck 01

14) Executive Gadchiroli Shri.Pathurkar

Engineer Ex.Eng.

Tultuli Project Ph. 22362, Fax 22276

Car 01, Jeep 02, Truck 01, Tractor 02


WATER QUALITY MONITORING CENTRES

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Sr. Facility Location Authority incharge

No Resource
--------------------------------------------------

Name, Designation, Address, Phone, Fax

-----|----------------------------------------|---------------------|------------------------------------------

Water quality Monitoring - 1 Regional Dr. M.V. Pandit, Centre, Nagpur Public Dy.Director of Health Services, Health Nagpur Circle, Nagpur. Lab,Nagpur TELEPHONES -

531933 / 522983 (Office) 532089 (Res) 535240 (Fax)

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

CIVIL DEFENCE

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

1) Four wheelers - 1 National Shri. K. M. Nandyal,

Civil Director,

Defence

2) Wireless Sets - 6 College,Nagpur

Civil lines,

Nagpur TELEPHONES -

3) Ambulance - 1 531614 (office) & (Fax) 234423 (Residence)

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

ARMED FORCES UNIT (AIR MAINTENANCE COMMAND)

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

1) Manpower 1352 Vayu Sena Air Marshal G. Gururani,

Nagar, PVSM, AVSM, VSM AOC-in-c,

Four wheelers 30 Seminary HQ. MC IAF, Vayu Sena Nagar,

Hills, Nagpur.

No. of Stations 6 Nagpur Tel.No. 526011 Extn.2250 (o)

No. of Wireless Sets 25 525555 (Direct)

Mobile Crane 1 Air Vice Marshal V.S. Vohra,

VSM, Vayusena Nagar, Nagpur.

Spl.Equpiments for fires- 1 Tel.No. 526011 Extn. 2261 (o) 526666

No. of beds in Stn. - 10

Sick Quarter Air Cmde L.K. Verma,

Senior Air & Admn.Staff Officer,

No. of X-ray machine 1 HQ. MC IAF, Vayu Sena Nagar, Nagpur.

No. of Ambulances 2 Tel .No. 526011 Extn.2211 (o)

No. of Water tankers 2 527879 (Direct)

No. of Doctors - 3

No. of Med. Asstts 18

Aircraft (AVRO)


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

POLLUTION CONTROL BOARD - REGIONAL OFFICES

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Sr. Facility Location Authority incharge

No Resource
-----------------------------------------------

Name, Designation, Address, Phone, Fax

-----|-----------------------------------|--------------------------|------------------------------------------

1) Manpower - 19 6th Floor, Shri A.M. Deshpande,

Udyog Bhavan, Regional Officer,

Four wheelers- 2 Civil Lines, Maharashtra Pollution Control

Nagpur Board Nagpur.

TELEPHONES - 530308 (Office)

530308 (Fax), 236283 (Resi.)

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

DIRECTORATE OF INDUSTRIAL SAFETY AND HEALTH

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

1) Manpower - 23 6th Floor, Shri. V.S. Morey,

Udyog Bhavan, Joint Director,

2) Two wheeler - 1 Civil Lines, Industrial Safety & Health,

(Jeep) Nagpur Nagpur.

TELEPHONES 530745(Office) 524105 (Resi.)

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

RADIO STATIONS

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

1) Recording Studio All India Miss. K.T. Meshram,

Radio Station Station Director,

2) High Power Transmitters Aakashwani All India Radio Station,

Medium Wave Square, Nagpur. Civil Lines,

3) F.M. Transmeter. Nagpur TELEPHONES 533832 (Office)546920 (Resi.) 532059/532394 (Fax)

Shri. J.N. Barwe,

Assistant News Editor,

All India Radio Station,

Nagpur.Ph. 532394 (o) 224673 (R)


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Private Sector

NCC/NSS Volunteers

The following colleges have NCC and NSS volunteers who can help the police.

Sr.No
Name of College/School
Place
No.of Volunteers (NCC)
No.of volunteers (NSS)
Total No.of volunteers
Phone.Nos
1. Shri Shivaji Art and Commerce College Gadchiroli .
Gadchiroli ---------- 100 100 22244
2. Shri Shivaji High-School Gadchiroli.
Gadchiroli 100 ------------- 100 -----------
3. Raje Vishweshwarrao Education Society College,Aheri.
Aheri ----------------- 100 100 -------------
4. Govt.Science College. Gadchiroli
Gadchiroli ------------- 50
50 -----------

Following is a list of timber merchants who can provide firewood for disposal of dead bodies.

Shri Sai Saw Mill ,Gadchiroli.

Ajij R.Panjawani , Gandhi Chowk, Main Road , Armori, Dist. Gadchiroli.

Shri.Dhulariya and Brothers Betkati, Tq.Korchi , Dist. Gadchiroli.

M/s. Samarth Saw Mill ,Ramnagar,Chandrapur.

List of Private Contractors in Gadchiroli District

Sr.No. Name Address Equipment
& Telephone No Available

1 Aditya Construction Shastri Nagar Mul Road Poclain –2

Prop.H.M.Sancheti Chandrapur. Exavator –2

Ph.No. 54916,52960. Tipper-10

Rollers-2

Water Tanker- 1

2 R.K.Sancheti Shastri Nagar Mul Road Poclain-2

Prop.V.K.Sancheti Chandrapur. Exavator-2

Ph.No. 52057,54174 Tipper-10

51146. Roller-2

Water Tanker-2

3 National Construction Civil Lines,Chandrapur. Tippers-10

Company. Ph.No. 55112 Truck-5

Prop.Girish Thakker. Roller-5

Hotmix plant-1

4 Shri Gajanan Construction Civil Lines, Exacator-2

Company. Chandrapur. Tipper -6

Prop. C.N.Wasade. Ph,No. 54186,51868 Roller-2

Hotmix plant-1

Truck – 4

5 Seth Construction Company Commercial Complex Exavator-2

Prop.Yashpal Seth. Gandhi Chowk,Chandrapur Roller-1

Ph.No.52228 Tipper-4

6 Ajwani Construction MIDC Ghugus Road, Exavator-2

Company. Chandrapur. Roller-2

Prop.G.H.Ajwani Hotmix plant-1

7 P.G.Trivedi SBI Colony ,Chandrapur. Poclain-2

Tipper-3

Roller-2

8 George Construction 9-C , Shastri Nagar Roller-2

Company. Chandrapur. Tipper-4

Prop.K.J.George Ph.No.55461,53115 Truck-4

Mixer-4

9 Kalika Prasad Gupta Gandhi Chowk ,Ballarpur. Roller-1

Ph.No.40607,40507. Truck-2

Tipper-2

10 Laxmi Construction Rajura Exavator-1

Prop.Laxman Gupta. Ph.No. 22011 Roller-2

Truck-4

Tipper-3

 


List Of Private Hospitals With The Number Of Bed Available

Sr.No

Name of Taluka

Name of Hospital and phone No.

No.of Bed available

Facilities.

1

Gadchiroli

1)Dhanwantri Hospital Gadchiroli. Ph.No. 22596

2)Sai Nursing home and Hospital Gadchiroli.Ph.No.32303

3)Balwant Smruti Hospital Gadchiroli. Ph.no.22547

4)A & E Hospital Gadchiroli.Ph.No.22458

3

 

10

 

5

2

Medical Help.

 

As above

 

As above

As above.

2

Kurkheda

Aamhi Aamchya Aarogyasathi,Kurkheda

Ph.No.4471

____

As above

3

Dhanora

Search Hospital,Shodhgram (Chatgaon)PH.No.5406,07,08,(O)/ 54012®

20

Ambulance and Medical help.

4

Aheri

Assisi Sewa Sadan Hospital,Nagepalli.

Ph.No.6461

50

Medical Help.

5

Bhamragad

Lokbiradari Prakalpa Hospital ,Hemalkasa.

10

Ambulance and Medical Help.

6

Sironcha

Chason Memorial Hospital,Sironcha.

5

As above.

List of Private Doctors with their Speciality

Sr.No

Name of Doctor.

Address

Ph.No.

Speciality

1

Dr.S.B.Kumbhare

Dhanwantri Hospital Gadchiroli

22596

Physician and Radiologists.

2

Dr.Mrs.Rathod

Sai Nursing Home Gadchiroli.

32303

Gynacologists.

3

Dr.A.G.Deshpande

A & I Hospital Gadchiroli

22458

As above.

4

Dr.Hemant Appalwar

Balwant Smruti Hospital Gacchiroli.

22547

Opthamologists.

5

Dr.Mrs.Appalwar

As above

22547

Physician.

6

Dr.Mrs.Palpaukar

Gadchiroli

------

Physician

7

Dr.Wardhewar

Gadchiroli

------

Physician

8

Dr.Lakhari

Gadchiroli

22218

Physician

9

Dr.Gagpalliwar

Gadchiroli

32429

Physician

10

Dr.Jain

Gadchiroli

22557

Physician

11

Dr.Mrs.Jain

Gadchiroli

22557

Physician

12

Dr.Zoting

Gadchiroli

22427

Physician

13

Dr.Kolhe

Gadchiroli

-----

Physician

14

Dr.Unadkar

Gadchiroli

22205

Physician

15

Dr.Choudhary

Gadchiroli

-----

Physician

16

Dr.Ram Sharma

Gadchiroli

32304

Physician

17

Dr.Abhay Bang

Search Hospital,Shodh Gram , Chatgaon.

5406,07

Peadiatrician

18

Dr.Mrs.Rani Bang

  

5407,08

Gynacologists

19

Dr.Mrs.Tajane

Gadchiroli

------

Physician

List of newspapers published from Gadchiroli and newspapers having offices in Gadchiroli

Sr.No.

Name and address of newspaper / representative

1.

Daily Loksatta, Dhanora road, Gadchiroli. Phone 32309

2.

Daily Hitavad, Gokul Nagar, gadchiroli. Phone 22549 / 32259

3.

Daily Tarun Bharat, Trimurti Chowk, Gadchiroli. Phone 32443

4.

Daily Navbharat, Near Police Station, Gadchiroli. Phone 22572

5.

Daily Janvad, P.O. Armori.

6.

Daily Lokmat, Gandhi Chowk, Gadchiroli. Phone 22557

7.

Daily Maharashtra Times, Behind Shivaji college, Gadchiroli. Phone32334

8.

Daily samna, Rampuri Ward, Gadchiroli Phone 22794

9.

Daily Mahavidarbha, Gadchiroli

10.

Daily Adivasi Manus, Near Police Station, Gadchiroli. Phone 22424

11.

Daily Gadchiroli Patrika, Near Ram Mandir, Gadchiroli. Phone 32410

12.

Weekly Zopadpattitil Vichar, Near Ram Mandir, Gadchiroli. Phone 32410

13.

Weekly Gadchiroli Samachar, Camp Area, Gadchiroli. Phone 32371

14.

Weekly Gadchiroli Savera, Kabra Niwas, Gadchiroli. Phone 32527

15.

Weekly Manav Sanskriti, Dhanora Road, Gadchiroli. Phone 22519

16.

Weekly Vainganga Pukar, Ramnagar ward, Gadchiroli. Phone 22886

17.

Weekly Gadchiroli Mahila, Gadchiroli. Phone 22458

18.

Weekly Chamorshi Lalkar. Phone 32238

19.

Weekly Gadchiroli.Senapati, Talav Road, gadchiroli

20.

Weekly Ektechi Haak, Phule Ward, Gadchiroli.

21.

Weekly Margdeep, Athwadi Bazar, Gadchiroli

22.

Weekly Gadchiroli Vaibhav, Gadchiroli

23.

Weekly Shivchatra

24.

Weekly Vanlaxmi, Chamoshi road, Gadchiroli

25.

Weekly Dhandal, Wadsa, Gadchiroli

 

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