29/08/2014
Status Report
Government Resolutions
Post Disaster Rehabilitation
  Project Related Rehabilitation
  International (ECMWF)
  India
  Regional
 
IMD - Mumbai
 
District - Parbhani
Introduction

As a part of the overall preparedness of the state, the Government of Maharashtra has a State Disaster Management Action Plan to support and strengthen the efforts of the district administration. In this context, every district has evolved it's own District Disaster Management Action Plan (DDMAP). It is expected that these multi-hazard response plans would increase the effectiveness of administrative intervention.

Multi-disaster Response Plan

The DDMAP addresses the districts’ response to disaster situations such as earthquakes, floods, cyclones, epidemics, off-site industrial disasters and roads accidents and fires. Some of these disasters such as floods and earthquakes affect large areas causing extensive damage to life, property and environment while others such as epidemics only affect large populations. In any case, the management of these disasters requires extensive resources and manpower for containment by remedial action.

The present plan is a multi-hazard response plan for the disasters and outlines the institutional framework required for managing such situations. However, the plan assumes a disaster specific form in terms of the actions to be taken by the various agencies involved in the disaster. The front-end or local level of any disaster response organisation will differ depending upon the type of disaster, but at the level of the back-end i.e., at the controlling level at the district it will almost remain same, for all types of disasters.


Objectives

The objectives of the District Disaster Management Action Plan are :

· To improve preparedness at the district level, through risk and vulnerability analysis , to disasters and to minimise the impact of disasters in terms of human, physical and material loss.

· To ascertain the status of existing resources and facilities available with the various agencies involved in the management of disasters in the district and make it an exercise in capability building of district administration. This enables the district to face a disaster in a more effective way and builds confidence across different segments of society. It will be a positive factor for long term development of the district.

· To utilise different aspects of disaster mitigation for development planning as a tool for location and area specific planning for development in the district.

· To use scientific and technological advances in Remote Sensing, GIS etc. in preparation of this plan with a view to ensure their continuous use for development planning.

· To develop a framework for proper documentation of future disasters in the district, to have an update on critical information essential to a plan, to critically analyse and appraise responses and to recommend appropriate strategies

· To evolve DDMAP as an effective managerial tool within the overall policy framework of Government of Maharashtra.

Response to disasters, in the absence of a defined plan, would be arbitrary leading to overemphasis of some actions and absence of other actions which could be critical. The objectives of any disaster management plan should be to localise a disaster and to the maximum extent possible contain it so as to minimise the impact on life, the environment and property. A formal plan for managing disasters is therefore necessary. This would include

a. pre-planning a proper sequence of response actions,

b. allocation of responsibilities to the participating agencies,

c. developing codes and standard operating procedures for various departments and relief agencies involved.

d. inventory of existing facilities and resources

e. mechanisms for effective management of resources

f. co-ordination of all relief activities including those of NGOs to ensure a coordinated and effective response.

g. Co-ordination with the State response machinery for appropriate support

h. Monitoring and evaluation of actions taken during relief and rehabilitation

"Outline of Vulnerability Assessment" prepared by CSSD/EMC has been used as the basic instrument to collate district level information to meet the database requirements for the preparation of DDMAP.

Policy Statement

The underlying policy of the DDMAP is to protect life, environment and property while ensuring mitigation of the disaster to the maximum extent possible, relief to those affected and restoration of normalcy at the earliest.

Essentially, communities draw their support from the social institutions, administrative structure, and values and aspirations they cherish. Disasters may temporarily disorganise the social units and the administrative system and disrupt their lives built around these values and aspirations. A systematic effort to put back the social life on its normal course with necessary technology support and resources will contribute significantly to the resilience of the community and nation.

This policy forms the basis of the DDMAP strategy. It aims at capacity building and prompt utilization of resources in a disaster situation through a partnership of the GOM, NGOs, Private Initiatives and the community. In pursuance with this policy, DDMAP addresses itself to strengthening the pre-disaster and post-disaster responses of various actors and stakeholders including the “victims” of the disaster.

OVERVIEW OF PARBHANI DISTRICT

Location

Parbhani, earlier also known as “ Prabhavatinagar “, is one of the seven districts in the Marathwada region of Maharashtra state.

This entire Marathwada region, a distinct geographical region, was a part of the erstwhile Nizam State; later a part of Hyderabad State ; after reorganisation of states in 1956 it became part of the then Bombay state; and from 1960 onwards it is part of the present Maharashtra state.

Parbhani district lies between 18.45° and 20.01° North Latitudes and 76.13° and 77.09° East Longitude.

The district is bounded on the north by Buldhana and Akola districts, on the east by Yeotmal and Nanded districts, on the south by Latur district and on the west by Beed and Jalna districts.

The state capital of Mumbai is km to the west ; Parbhani is well connected by road to other major towns in Maharashtra and also in the neighbouring state of Andhra Pradesh.

Parbhani is an important railway junction on the Mumbai-Parbhani-Kachiguda and Parli -Parbhani-Bangalore lines. Efforts are on to start a broad gauge Parbhani-Manmad-Mumbai line. This will facilitate easy transport to and from Mumbai.

Area and Administrative Divisions

Parbhani district covers an area of about 10,972 km². The east- west extent of the district is 135 km while the south to north extent is 140 km.

The district is divided into 12 administrative Sub-units (Tahsils)-Parbhani, Gangakhed, Pathri, Purna, Palam, Selu, Hingoli, Kalamnuri, Basmath, Jintur Aundha and Sengaon.

These 12 tahsils are grouped in 2 Sub-Divisions as follows.

Sub- Division Tahsils incorporated in them

Sailu Sailu, Parbhani, Gangakhed, Pathri , Palam, Purna

Hingoli Hingoli, Kalamnuri,Basmath, Jintur, Aundha, Sengaon

There are 11 towns with Municipal Councils and 1526 Villages.

Salient Physical Features

Physiographically the district can be divided into two major parts - hilly regions in the northern,northeastern and southern parts and low lying areas on the banks of rivers Dudhana, Godavari, Kayadhu and Penganga.

The hills on the north and north east form part of the Ajanta Hill ranges which pass through Jintur, Hingoli and Kalamnuri tahsils.The hills on the southern side are the Balaghat Hill ranges. The district is at an average height of 457 m from mean sea level.

Soil

Black cotton soil - as in many districts of Maharashtra - is the predominant soil type seen here, except for some patches of clayey to silty alluvial soil along the courses of the major rivers of Godavari, Dudhana, Purna and Karpara.

Sr. No. Name of Tehsil Pre-dominant Soil Cover
1. Pathri Deep to Medium Clay
2. Hingoli Very Deep to Medium Clay
3. Kalamnuri Deep to Shallow Clay toClay, Loam
4. Basmat Very Deep to Deep Clayey
5. Jintur Medium Clay to Clay Loam
6. Sailu Deep Clayey
7. Parbhani Deep Clayey
8. Gangakhed Deep Clayey
9. Purna Deep Clayey
10. Aundha Medium Clay to Clay Loam


Land Use Patterns

Agriculture is the major land use category with more than 77% of the total area under agriculture. Forest land is glaringly small in area and accounts for only 2.59% of the total area.

Inhabited area 6772.64 Sq.Km.
Agricultural area 10972.00 Sq.Km.
Industrial area 373.57 Sq.Km.
Forest Cover 178.00 Sq.Km.
Wastelands 38300.00 Htrs.
Drought Prone areas Some Parts of Hingoli, Kalamnuri, Gangakhed & Jintur Talukas ( Source D.R.D.A )


Climate and Rainfall

The climate of the district is in general hot and dry, except for the monsoon season from June to September.

The winter season extends from December till February and the summer season from March till May.

The maximum temperature recorded in the month of May ranges from 41°C to 43°C while the lowest temperature recorded in the month of December/January ranges between 11°C and 14°C.

The district generally receives rainfall during the months of July, August and September from the south-west monsoon with average annual rainfall of 847 mm

Some showers are also experienced during Oct-Nov from the retreating monsoon.

The total annual rainfall in 1996 was 983 mm while the maximum rainfall recorded - 1456 mm - was in 1988.

The Talukawise average rain fall is as under

1) Parbhani - 803 mm ,

2) Purna - 803 m.m.,

3) Pathri - 816.7 m.m.

4) Sailu - 816.7 m.m.

5) Gangakhed - 697.0 m.m.

6) Palam - 697.0 m.m.

7) Hingoli - 837.6 m.m.

8) Sengaon - 837.6 m.m.

9) Aundha - 837.6 m.m.

10) Basmath - 1009 m.m.

11) Jintur - 813.3 m.m.

12) Kalamnuri - 961.2 m.m.

Socio-economic Profile

Demographic Features

According to the 1991 census, the demographic features in Parbhani district are:

Total number of households : 3,80,000

Total Population : 21,17,035

Total male population : 10,83,724

Total female population : 10,33,241

Sex Ratio : 953

Urban Population : 4,77,000

Rural Population : 16,40,035

Percentage of urban

population to total population : 22.51%

Population Density : 192

Literacy rate : 47.58%

Male Literacy rate : 64.90%

Female Literacy rate : 29.41%

SC/ST

SC Percentage : 11.02%

ST Percentage : 5.27%

Urban Locations

Sr

No

Name

Population

Population Density

Major Occupational Patterns

       
AgriLabours Trade & Commerce   Other 
Services

1

Parbhani

190255

3303

  2.59                4.96                 18.44

2

Hingoli

 54457

3363

  4.90                6.78                16.72

3

Basmat

 42338

3836

  3.61                5.91                 16.64

4

Sailu

 32380

7026

  9.74               5.91                  15.01

5

Purna

 28823

1715

  5.52                3.93                 15.86

6

Jintur

 28275

1095

  6.06                 6.60                14.95

7

Gangakhed

27651

  608

  4.74                 7.13                15.55

8

Manwat

 25468

 3017

  7.84                 7.50                14.78

9

Pathri 

 20466

 1696

10.65                 4.32                14.83 

10

Kalamnuri

 15764

  507

  7.31                 5.61                14.89

11

Sonpeth

 10701

2470

14.21                 4.90               15.04



Rural Centres

Sr No

Name of the Rural Centre

Population

Population Density

Major Occupational Patterns

       
Cultivators AgriLabours  Other Services

1

Zari

Tq.  Parbhani

7150

24.65 

10.13                 24.28              8.43

2

Bori

Tq. Jintur

9958

 6.8

  4.58                  19.10           14.87

3

Aundha

Tq. Aundha

8875

45.28

  6.28                  14.49           14.85

4

Akhada Balapur

Tq.  Kalamnuri

8639

13.03

  3.74                  14.19           16.40

5

Kurunda

Tq.  Basmat

9451

 8.2

14.42                   16.83            7.59

6

Goregaon

Tq.  Basmat

7091

4.68

18.88                   18.11             7.56

7

Palam

Tq. Palam

(Ex. Gangakhed)

7721

3.43

  9.84                   17.12           11.71

8

Walur 

Tq. Pathri

7939

1.80

14.42                   20.68             8.09



Historical and Religious Centres

Name of the Historical and Religious centre and nearest Urban or Major Rural Centre listed above

Periods of Festive Occasions, Months

Estimated tourist or visiting population

PARBHANI  TQ.

         1. Parbhani

         2. Pokharni   

         3. Tridhara

         4. Parbhani

         5. Navaghadh

                                            

1)  Hajrat Turabul Huq.            

    Shah Darga  (Urus - Feb )

 2) Shri Narsigh Sausthan

     Pokharni ( March/April) 

 3) Shri Shektra Trdhara   

 4) Shri Khandoba Festival

                        (Desember)

 5) Shri Neminath Jain 

     Mandir    ( Jan. / Feb. )

    

 

      50,000

      20,000

      20,000

      10,000 

      10,000

AUNDHA  TQ.

         1.  Aundha  Nagnath 

                 (Temple )  

         2.  Aundha  Nagnath 

                 (Temple)

         3. Village Rajapur

        

         4. Atishaya Kshetra 

1) Nagpanchami  ( August)

2) Dasra & Deewali Festival

3)  Mahashivratri ( March)

         10 days Festival

4) ArdhNari Notashwar                                 

                                (May)

5)  Shirad Sohojur Jain              Mandir          ( September ) 

 

 

      50,000

      50,000

      3,00,000

      3,000 to 5,000

       15,000

  

HINGOLI TQ.

          1 .  Hingoli      

          2.   Narsi

      

 1) Dasra Festival (Oct/Nov)          

    (10 Days)

 2) Sant Namdev Sansthan

      Narsi  ( April )  

       40,000 to 50,000

       10,000 to 15,000

PURNA  TQ.

          1 . Chudava

          2 . Takli (Dh.)   

          3.  Takli (Dh)

          4.  Sanephal 

          5.  Purna     

          6.  Purna

          7.  Laxminager

1) Mahadev Mandir (April )     

2) Gangaji Bapu Devsthan

( Every Month’s  Pornima &           Aamawsya )

3) Daji Guru Maharaj (April)

4) Parat Ganga  (April)

5) Mastansaha Bali (Feb.)

6) Guru Budhiswami Sausthan    (April)

7) Shri Devi Festival March)

         5,000

         4,000  to 5,000

         3,000 to 5,000       

         5,000 to 5,500

         10,000 to 15,000 

         3,000 to 5,000

         4,000 to 5,000     


SAILU TQ.

          1. Sailu

          2. Sailu 

1) Keshavrao Babasaheb Sausthan ( Dec.)

2) Jivajibuva Sausthan (Nov.)

           50,000

        

           3,000 to 5,000         

GANGAKHED

          1. Raniswargaon

          2. Gangakhed

          3. Nagthana

          4. Naukatwadi

 

 

 1)  Devi-Yatra ( April )

 2)  Ashtami & Dasera (Oct.)

 

 3 ) Balaji Mandir

      Dasera ( Oct.)

 4) Nagpanchmi ( August )

 5) Datta Mandir

     Datta Pornima ( Dec.)

            5,000

            20,000

            25,000

            10,000

            25,000

PATHRI TQ.

          1. Gunj (Kh)

          2. Gaudgav

          3. Kumbhari

          4. Dhalegaon

          5. Rampuri (Kh)

          6. Rudhi   

          7. Kasapuri      

          8. Parangavan     

       

1) Yoganand Maharaj

          ( March/April)

2) Renuka Devi (Feb/March)

3) Aaychi  (Feb/March)

4) Satsang Geeta Bhavan

                (September)

5) Ratneshwar (Feb./March)

6) Dyneshwar Mauli (Feb.)

7) Mahadev Yatra 

                   (March/Apri)

8) Mahadev Yatra 

                   (March/Apri)

            20,000 

            3,000

            7,000 

            10,000

            7,000 

            10,000

            4,000

            4,000

KALAMNURI TQ.

          1. Kalamnuri  

              (Dongarkada)

          2.  Yehlegaon

          3.   Dongargaon

1) Shri Jayshankar Mandir

                (Feb./March               

2) Tukaram Maharaj

     Sansthan (Feb.& June)

3) Dattatraya Sansthan

    (Datta Jayanti - March)  

 

           5,000 to 7,000   

           10,000 to 15,000  

           3,000

JINTUR  TQ.

          1.  Jintur 

1)  Naminath  Jain  Temple 

           10,000



Seasonal Migration


Purpose

Area (specify Talukas)

Period (calendar months)

Estimated  Population  

in/out  

For  Suger Cane Harvesting

    Pathri

    Basmath

    Kalamnuri

  Nov. to May

        Nov. to May

        Nov. to May

1237  (In)        

5074   (In)

3700   (In)


Agricultural and Crop Pattern in the District

Types

Names

Cropping Period in Months

Market (District, State, Export)

Major Crops (Irrigated)

1. Sugarcane

2. Banana   

3. Wheat

4. Ground Nut

One  Year 

One  Year         

Nov       To  March

Jan       To  May 

District Market

      --  ”—

      --  ”—

      --  ” --   

 

Major Crops (Non - Irrigated)

1. Cotton

2. Kharif Jowar

3. Tur          

4. Mung    

5. Udid

6. Rabi Jowar

7. Safflower

8. Gram

June     To   Dec.

June     To   Nov.

June     To   Dec.

June     To   Aug

June     To   Sept.          Oct.      To   Feb      

Sept.     To  Feb

Oct       To  Feb

District Market

      --  ”—

      --  ”—

      --  ”—

      --  ”—

      --  ”—

      --  ”—

Major Cash Crops

1. Cotton 

2.  Sugarcane   

June    To   Dec

One    Year 

District Market

      --  ”—

Major Plantations

1. Orange (Santra)

2. Sweet Lime

3. Mango

4. Papaya

       Perennial          

       --  ”—

        --  ”—

       Biannual

District Market

      --  ”—

      --  ”—



River Systems and Dams

Rivers

Parbhani district is divided into three subbasins - Godavari, Godavari-Purna and Penganga.

The Godavari river passes through the southern part of the district . The river Purna which is tributary of Godavari, passes from east to west through the northern part of the district and joins the Godavari at Kantheshwar in Purna Taluka.

The Penganga flows exactly at the north east, bordering Akola , Yavatmal and Parbhani Dist.

The Godavari Sub-basin occupies nearly 33% area. The Indrayani, Khadki, Galati, and Dhond are the major tributaries. The Godadavri-Purna sub-basin,in the central part of the district, covers 33% of the total district area. Dudhana and Karpara are the main tributaries of the Purna. Penganga sub-basin covers the northern part of the district. The river Kayadhu is the only major tributary of the Penganga in Parbhani district.

Dams

Major Dams are on the Purna river

¨ Yeldari Dam (Hydroelectric Power Station) in Jintur Tahsil

¨ Sidheshwar Dam (Irrigation Reservoir)in Aundha Tahsil

Medium Projects

¨ Masoli Dam at Makhni in Tahsil Gangakhed.

¨ Karpara Dam at Niwli Bk, Tahsil Jintur.

Irrigation Projects.

Major

Sr

No

Location of the project(s)

Taluka

Catchment area, sq. km

Target  command area in Ha

1.

Yeldari

Jintur

60,329.70

     Nil

2.

Sidheshwar

Jintur

  7,770.00

  57,988


Medium

Sr No

Location of the project(s)

Taluka

Catchment area, sq. km

Target  command area in Ha

1.

Masoli

Gangakhed

281.07

2591

2.

Karpara

Jintur

270

2150


In addition there are a total of 180 minor projects completed by the Irrigation departments of the Zilla Parishad and the state government.


Power Stations and Electricity Installations

There is a Hydroelectric power station at Yeldari in Jintur Tahsil with a capacity of 75 KW.

All towns and and villages have been electrified.

Sr. No.

Name  of  Power  Station

Officer’s Name/Designation

Phone Nos

   1

Hydro Power  Station

Purna  Project  Yeldari

Executive  Engineer M.S.E.B. Yeldari

60338

    2

220    K.V.  Parbhani

Dy. Executive  Engineer Shri  Malleshyam

48619

    3

132    K.V. Sub-Station

Centre,  Gangakhed

Shri  Ghan Asstt   Engineer

22076

    4

 132  K.V.  Parbhani

Shri  Kakkuri Dy. Executive  Engineer

23737

    5

132 K.V. Pathri

Shri Arol Jr.  Engineer   

55386 

    6

132 K.V. Hingoli

Shri Deshpande Asstt. Engineer

22615

    7

132 K.V. Jintoor

Shri Akoshe Jr. Engineer

24088

    8

132  K.V. Kurunda

Jr. Engineer

46036

    9

 66   K.V. Hingoli

Jr. Engineer

22236

   10

33 K.V. Purna

Shri  Bandale Jr.  Engineer

55280

11 33 K.V. Pathri Shri Yelpulla Jr. Engineer 55334
12 33 K.V. Manwat Shri Kulkarni Jr. Engineer 44162
13 33 K.V. Sailu Shri Bahete Jr. Engineer 22426
14 33 K.V.Gangakhed Shri Shetekar Jr. Engineer 22059
15 33 K.V. Pallam Shri Vidoalkar Jr. Engineer 70227
16 33 K.V. Sonpeth Shri Shetekar Jr. Engineer 40208
17 33 K.V. Rampuri (Kh) Shri Sharma Sub. Engineer 6624
18 33 K.V. Hatgaon(Nakhate) Shri Tare Sub. Engineer  
19 33 K.V. Parbhani Shri Partani Jr. Engineer 48219
20 33 K.V. Pimpaldari Shri Sadeq Hussain
Jr. Engineer
 
21 33 K.V. Pedgaon Shri Umrikar Sub. Engineer 69088
22 33 K.V. Bobde Takli Shri Birajdar Jr. Engineer  
23 33 K.V. Tadkalas Shri Dutte Jr. Engineer  
24 33 K.V. Ranisawargaon Shri Md. Kadar Sub. Engineer 66046
25 33 K.V. Wallur Shri Jogdand Sub. Engineer 67018
26 33 K.V. Kansoor Shri Ealpulla Jr. Engineer  
27 33 K.V. Khadka Shri Shetekar Jr. Engineer  
28 33 K.V. M.K.V. Parbhani Shri Mokat Jr. Engineer 23498
29 33 K.V. Mardasgaon Shri Vidolkar Jr. Engineer  
30 Aundha 33 K.V. Shri Chakurkar Jr. Engineer 60038
31 Sengaon 33 K.V. Shri Mudgulkar Jr. Engineer 40246
32 Limbala 33 K.V. Shri Kapale Sub. Engineer 22606
33 Goregao 33 K.V. Shri Pensalwar Jr. Engineer 63023
34 Basmath 33 K.V. Shri V.R. Nalbalwar
Asstt. Engineer
24013
35 Basmath 33 K.V. Shri Yeotikar Jr. Engineer 24055
36 Basmath Urban Unit (33 K.V.) Shri Yeotikar Jr. Engineer 24012
37 Basmath Rural Unit (33 K.V.) Shri Suryawanshi Sub. Engineer 25195
38 Hatta Office Shri B.T. Prwe Sub. Engineer 46826
39 Jawala (B) (33 K.V.) Shri Salve Jr. Engineer 40062
40 Kurunda 33 K.V. Shri Deshpande Jr. Engineer 46041
41 Girgaon 33 K.V. Shri D.A. Dabade Jr. Engineer 46049
42 Shirad Shahapur (33 K.V.) Shri Naimoddin Sub. Engineer 48060
43 Waranga 33 K.V. Shri Kankal Jr. Engineer 48232
44 Akhadabalapur (33 K.V.) Shri Hanif Sub. Engineer 42308
45 Kalamnuri /S/Dn Shri S.S. Deshpande
Asstt. Engineer
40274
46 Kalamnuri 33 K.V. Shri G.W. Joshi Sub. Engineer 40203
47 Jintur Sub-Divn. Shri N.D. Pathak
Asstt. Engineer
24088
48 Adgaon 33 K.V. Shri Shahane Sub. Engineer 6616
49 Bori 33 K.V. Shri N.P. Charthankar
Sub. Engineer
42333
50 Jintoor Urban Shri S.S. Sharma Jr. Engineer 24066
51 Jintoor Rural Shri A.M. Kandkhedkar
Sub. Engineer
22337
52 Charthana Shri N.U. Kulkarni Sub. Engineer 65018
53 Yeldari (o) Shri Heda Jr. Engineer 60324
54 Yeldari 33 K.V. Shri Heda Jr. Engineer 60338


Industries

As per 1994-95 figures, there are 232 Registered industries of which 47 industries are defunct. Thus 185 industries are functioning which collectively employs 5535 people.

The Maharashtra Industries Development Corporation has Industrial Estates at Parbhani and Hingoli

There are three sugar factories in co-operative sector, which have total produced 92209 m.t. sugar in the year 1994-95. Apart from these three factories two more factories are under construction.

¨ Purna Sahakari Karkhana at Basmath

¨ Godavari Dudhna Sahakari Karkhana at Deonandra Tq. Pathri

¨ Marathwada Sahakari Sakhar Karkhana at Dongerkada Tq. Kalamnuri,

There is one Spinning Mill at Parbhani which has produced. 7.43 m.t. staple in the year 1994-95. There are still 7 more spinning mills in Co-operative Sectors are under construction.

There is a fertilizer factory at village Mainapuri in Jintur Tq. which is under construction in co-operative Sector, which may engage 1500 labourers.

The extent of industrialisation is reflected in the number of industrial estates and the number of vehicles carrying finished goods and raw material through the district.

Number of Industrial Estates

5 (Under  MIDC  Sub Divn)

Types of Industries

Agrobased, Engineering,

Service based etc.

Total work force in industries

1280

Number of chemical industries/ tank farms

2

Number of pipelines carrying chemicals

3

Number of potentially hazardous locations

NIL

Number of vehicles carrying hazardous raw materials for industries (during a month)

NIL

Number of vehicles carrying hazardous finished products from industries (during a month)

NIL

Number of vehicles passing through the district carrying hazardous materials for industries (during  a month)

NIL

Number of container terminals

NIL


Name of the Industrial Estate

Location in the form of an address

No. of  industries in the estate

No. of Major Hazardous and Polluting Industries

Total Work Force in Industries

1.  Parbhani   MIDC

Parbhani-Basmath Road,Parbhani 

82

31(Closed)

--

1165.00

2. Gangakhed MIDC

Gangakhed-Kodri 

Road, Gangakhed

01(under Construction )

--

3.  Basmath  MIDC        

Basmat-Nanded Road, Basmath

01(under Construction )

--

  ----

4.  Hingoli     MIDC  

  

Hingoli-Aundha    Raod,  Hingoli

17 (Established)

07

(Not Working)

--

 100.00   



Transport and Communication Network

Railways have a good network of routes (total length of 259 kms) which link almost all talukas in the district. There are direct trains linking to Banglore , Mumbai , Ahmedbad , Bhopal, Amritsar, New Delhi and Hyderabad on Broad gauge section and Jaipur on Meter gauge section,

Road network is also extensive , connecting all talukas, and villages, state highways, district roads etc. The total length of roads is 6969.84 k.ms The State transport has a well spread out network with 7 Bus Depots. Almost all major Dist. head quarters and Pilgrim centres in the Maharashtra are connected with bus routes, including major cities of other states like Indore, Surat, Hyderabad.

Parbhani, Hingoli and Manwath are the important market places ; large amount of agricultural produce is transported both in and out, through private transporters. The sugar is transported to various parts of the country.

The following table summarises the transportation network in the district :

Number of National Highways                                         

Nil

Length (in Kms) of National Highways

Nil

State highways (in Kms)

556

ZP roads (in Kms)

4998.58

Number of bridges on rivers 

                                I)   Major

                               II)   Minor 

                               III)  Culvert

14

138

464

Number of ST depots

07

Numbers of villages not accessible by ST

372

Number of Ports or jetties

Nil

Number of boats

Nil

Number of railway stations with mail / express halts

06

Number of railway bridges

112

Non-electrified railway routes (in Kms)

259

Electrified railway routes (in Kms)

Nil

Number of unmanned railway crossings

46

Number of manned railway  crossings

12

Number of airports/air strips

Nil


As on 31st March 1995 , there were 302 post offices, and 43 telephone exchanges with 7430 telephone connections. There are 13 Post offices per one Lakh Population.

There is one low power transmission centre at Parbhani by which, Doordarshan service is available with almost every village. There is also one All India Radio station at Parbhani which transmits on the Medium Wave, and also relays the broadcasting of All India Radio Mumbai. Moreover, the use of Dish antennas transmitting the various satellite channels through special cables is also increasing.

Proposed Development

New Industrial Estates proposed

Name of the industrial estate

Co-op Industrial

Estate, Jintur 

Jintur MIDC

Jintur

Location of the industrial estate

Parbhani Road, Jintur

Aundha Road, Jintur

Nearest Urban / Major rural centre

Jintur

Jintur


Large Industries Set-up / Proposed

Name of the industries

    Location  of  the

        industries

   Type of

  Industries

1.Ashadeep Agro vision

   Ltd

Parbhani Irlad,   Selu

Processing of

Vegetable & fruits

2.Godawari Dudhana 

    SSK Ltd

Parbhani Deonandra  Parthri

Indl. Alcohol

3. India SSK Ltd

Parbhani Pusegaon     Hingoli

Sugar

4. Shri Saibaba SSK Ltd

Parbhani Mankeshwar  Jintur

-do-

5. Trimurti Stakply Co-op

    Soc. Ltd

Parbhani Basmathnager

Basmathnager

Particle Board

6. Shri S.S. Narsikar, 21

    M.P. Market, Nanded

Parbhani

Rubber latex 

Examination gloves

7. Himalaya Cement &

    Calcium Carbonate Ltd

Parbhani

Cotton Yarn

8. M.P. Patel & Sons

    Pvt  Ltd

Parbhani

Stainless Steel & Solder Powder

Silver alloys

9. Narsinha SSK Ltd

    Lohgaon Tq. Parbhani

Parbhani Lohgaon

Lohgaon

Sugar

10. Barashiv Hanuman

      Sakhar Karkhana, Ltd

Parbhani Jawala Bazar

Aundha Nagnath

-do-

11. Annapurna Fertilizer

      Ltd. Kanaurkhed  

      Tq. Purna

Parbhani Kanaurkhed

Purna

Superphosphates


3.11.3 Town Development Schemes

There are no proposed town development schemes or afforestation schemes proposed anywhere in the district.

3.11.4 New Dams

· No Major dam is proposed to be constructed in the district in the near future.

· Among Medium Projects, there is the Lower Dudhana Project on the river Dudhana near Brahmanwakdi village in Sailu tahsil, with a capacity of 24,480 cusecs, and proposed to be completed by March 1998.

RISK ASSESSMENT AND VULNERABILITY ANALYSIS

Economic, Social, Educational And Occupational Profile Of The Population

· Agriculture is the major economic activity with 74.27% of the total area of the district being used for agricultural purposes.

¨ The number of registered land holdings as per the 1991 census is 3,90,854 and the total land used by them 9,54,507 Ha.

¨ Extensive agricultural activity is noticed in the district except in the Jintur and Kalamnuri tahsils.

¨ In the command areas of the Isapur and Purna projects, double crops are a regular feature.

¨ There are three harvesting seasons - Kharif (Jowar, rice, cotton, groundnut, sunflowers) , Rabi (Jowar, Wheat, safflower), and summer (groundnut and vegetables).

· The total population of the district (1991 census) is 21,17,035.

¨ The average density of population is 192, with Parbhani taluka having the highest (311) and Jintur the lowest (146).

¨ There are 11 major rural centres where the population density is very high with Parbhani city having 3303 persons per km².

¨ 77.49% reside in rural areas; there are 8 major rural centres with populations between 7,000 to 10,000; majority of the population in these centres is engaged in agriculture.

¨ The sex ratio stands at 953 females per 1000 males.

· According to the 1991 census the number of people gainfully employed stood at 8,90,300 which is 42.05% of the total population.

¨ Farmers and farm labourers dominate the occupation categories with 38.95% and 41.42% respectively.

¨ 4.55% of the work force is engaged in trade and commerce activities while the remaining 15.08% are in other occupational categories like construction, transport, fishing, hunting, mining and quarrying etc.

· Industrial activities are on a very low scale with industrial area accounting for only 373.57 km² of the total district area.

¨ As per 1994-95 figures there are 185 industries running in the district which collectively employ 5535 people.

¨ The percentage of industrial workers to total population is negligible both in rural as well as urban centres.

¨ There are two MIDC estates at Parbhani and Hingoli - at other taluka places there is one proposed MIDC each.

· Educational facilities span the whole range from small Anganwadis to Degree colleges.

· Upto end of 1993-94 there were 1732 primary schools, 214 high schools,28 higher secondary schools, 12 colleges and other facilities like Navodaya Vidyalaya, one Pharmacy College and Homeopathy college at Parbhani, and the Marathwada Krishi Vidyapeeth at Parbhani.

Disaster Specific Proneness

Floods

· There are three major rivers, Godavari, Purna and Penganga ; the Purna being a tributary of the Godavari ; another important river is the Dudhana which is a tributary of the Purna.

· The district generally receives rainfall during the months of July, August and September from the south-west monsoon with average annual rainfall of 847 mm

· The total annual rainfall in 1996 was 983 mm while the maximum rainfall recorded - 1456 mm - was in 1988.

The major rivers of Godavari, Dudhana and Purna show flooding every year as shown below

Sr No

Name of the river

Flooding frequency over years

( Highest Water Level  )   

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

1984   1985       1986       1987       1988        1989       1990       1991       1992       1993       1994       1995       1996

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Location and Extent of Area Inundated (worst case) in Sq. Kms.

Corresponding Estimated Flood Damage in Rs. (Lakhs)

1

Dudhana

379.00   376.30   381.30  382.90   384.77   384.20    381.30    380.40     383.50    377.50     375.92    378.20     N.A.

As per map enclosed

2

Godavari

  N.A.      N.A.    369.60   369.68   373.20   377.37   376.20    371.330    374.40    367.70    372.66   367.94    371.68

  

-----

3

Purna

 N.A.      N.A.    363.06   364.56    369.54    370.24   368.01    364.34      369.15    361.60    361.10   361.72   362.70



· The Penganga flows along the north eastern border with Yavatmal and Akola districts and flooding in this river does not affect Parbhani district.

· Floods in Parbhani district as in most of the Marthwada are in the form of flash floods resulting from heavy precipitation in the catchment zones of the major rivers leading to increased flow downstream.

· Medium and large dams either situated outside the district (e.g. Majalgaon Dam, Beed District) or within the district (Yeldari and Sidheshwar Dams) also contribute to flooding in Parbhani district by releasing large quantities of water from the reservoirs during heavy spells of monsoon.

· There have also been instances of small earthen dams collapsing due to force of the water during monsoon and causing floods in the downstream villages.

· Except for the Karpara, most of the major rivers originate outside the district and may have dams built on them.

· Hence flooding in Parbhani district - a medium probability of future occurrence- depends on the rainfall in adjacent districts and the amount of water released from medium and large dams both outside and within the district.

· The district administration takes effective steps before the monsoon starts and this has helped in minimising the damage caused due to floods.

Past occurrences of flooding :

a. Occurrences of floods in the last 10 years 4

b. Number of deaths due to floods 3

c. Total loss due to floods Rs.10,50,64,840/-

A comprehensive list of risk prone villages w.r.t floods has been prepared by the district administration.

Taluka - Parbhani

There are a total of 12 villages which are flood prone.

¨ Angalgaon ------- Godavari River

¨ Deothana ------ Confluence of Dudhana and Purna rivers

¨ Mangangaon |

¨ Sultanpur |

¨ Karla |

¨ Matak-Hala |

¨ Digras |------ Dudhana river

¨ Dhar |

¨ Karadgaon |

¨ Mandva |

¨ Hingla |

¨ Murumba |

Taluka Pathri

There are nine villages which are flood prone - all along the banks of Godavari river.

¨ Mudgal

¨ Patoda

¨ Targavhan

¨ Dakupipri

¨ Vita Bk.

¨ Liba

¨ Vadi

¨ Vagi

¨ Kansur

Taluka Basmath

Only one village - Kurunda- is flood prone

Taluka Hingoli

Mahadev Wadi area of Hingoli town has a risk of floods

Taluka Palam

The following villages on the banks of the Godavari have a risk of floods,

¨ Ravrajpur

¨ Savangi Bk.

¨ Dhanewadi

¨ Khurlewadi

¨ Arkhed

¨ Umarthadi

¨ Someshwar

¨ Phala

¨ Pimpalgaon

¨ Bhogaon

¨ Gunz

¨ Rahati

¨ Digras

¨ Barbadi

Taluka Sengaon

Kolsa village on the banks of the Kayadhu river has a risk of floods.

Taluka Kalamnuri

¨ Takalgavhan

¨ Chikhli

¨ Shevala

Taluka Selu

The Dudhana river passes through the centre of the taluka and almost all the villages on the banks of the river are considered as flood prone by the Taluka officials.

¨ Sirala

¨ Raja

¨ Brahmangaon

¨ Kavaddhan

¨ Khupsa

¨ Moregaon

¨ Pimpri Bk.

¨ Pimpri Kd.

¨ Sonna

¨ Bramhavakdi

¨ Gomevakdi

¨ Rajvadi

¨ Kothala

¨ Rajura

¨ Mangrul

¨ Savangimagar

¨ Irlad

¨ Gogalgaon

¨ Valangwadi

¨ Amegaondigar

¨ Parditakli

¨ Dughra

¨ Kajali Rohina

¨ Karajkheda

¨ Takli Nilvarna

¨ Kherda

¨ Khadgaon

¨ Karadgaon

Taluka Aundha

The villages on the banks of the Purna river are considered as flood prone

¨ Rupur

¨ Dhar

¨ Matha

¨ Chimegaon

¨ Anjanwadi

¨ Pota Kh.

¨ Takalgavhan

¨ Nalgaon

¨ Ankhali

¨ Pharjabad

¨ Nandkheda

Taluka Gangakhed

The list of villages on the banks of the Godavari, Van, Masoli and Borna which are considered to have a risk of flooding during the monsoons :

¨ Vaghalgaon Japti

¨ Vita Kh.

¨ Lasina

¨ Dudhgaon

¨ Dhadi Ukkadgaon

¨ Ganga Pimpri

¨ Dhadi Pimpalgaon

¨ Molegaon

¨ Vadi Pimpalgaon

¨ Lohigram

¨ Khadka

¨ Pohandul

¨ Mohola

¨ Dharasur

¨ Mairalsavangi

¨ Goundgaon

¨ Khali

¨ Mahatburi

¨ Bhambarwadi

¨ Dusalgaon

¨ Dharkhed

¨ Nagtana

¨ Pimpri

¨ Zhola

¨ Masla

¨ Gangakhed

¨ Karam

¨ Ukadgaom Makta

¨ Vadi Naikota

¨ Naikota

¨ Bhisegaon

¨ Ukhli Bk.

¨ Sonepeth

¨ Sonkhed

¨ Gawli Pimpri

¨ Khapat Pimpri

¨ Dhardighol

¨ Isad

¨ Kodgaon

¨ Narlad

¨ Irlad

¨ Pimpaldari

¨ Kodri

Taluka Jintur

There is no village with risk of flooding during the monsoons

Taluka Purna

There is no village with risk of flooding during the monsoons

Preventive and Preparedness Measures undertaken for floods

· There is a Disaster Master Plan for floods already prepared.

· Control Room is established in the Collectorate during the monsoon months of June to October and works round the clock. Similar control rooms equipped with a telephone and special messengers are also established in each tahsil office and sub-divisional office.

· The Irrigation department maintains a wireless network with it’s flood monitoring stations.

· Village committees are constituted to help in evacuation and relief work.

· Land use regulations with respect to flood prone areas has been rigorously followed which has helped in minimising damage.

· The Upper Dudhana Project (under construction) in Jalna district will considerably reduce the vulnerability of downstream areas in Parbhani district to floods.

· Kolhapur type dams, Flood protection walls are also being constructed at a few places.

· There are 7 Rainfall Monitoring Stations and 5 Flood Monitoring Stations within the district.

Cyclones

· Parbhani District like all the other districts of Marathwada has stray instances of hailstorms rather than cyclones.

· Such hailstorms occur not necessarily during the monsoon period only, and may occur during the pre-monsoon and post-monsoon times also.

· On 13th March 1995, a hailstorm struck the district affecting the five talukas of Parbhani, Hingoli, Sengaon, Aundha and Kalamnuri.

· Although there was minimal human loss, extensive damage - to the tune of Rs.14.5 lakhs - was caused to standing crops.

· For such hailstorms, there is no effective warning system designed with the help of the Meteorological department.

Epidemics

· Although past occurrences of epidemics in Parbhani district have been minimal, the district administration has indicated a medium probability of future occurrence.

· Epidemics are generally caused due to contamination of drinking water, bad hygienic conditions for cooking and a general lack of awareness for cleanliness.

· 290 villages are without piped water supply in Parbhani district and have to depend on nalas/rivers/wells for drinking water.

· 1525 villages are without water quality monitoring facility - there is only one water quality laboratory at Parbhani.

· Population below poverty line - that part of the population most vulnerable to epidemics- accounts for 16% of the total population.

· Illiterates - another vulnerable section - constitute more than 61%.

· Risk of epidemics is high during the flood events (which are quite common in Parbhani district) when people invariably drink contaminated water.

· Hence all the flood prone villages enlisted earlier are potential risk areas for epidemics during the monsoon.

· There have been only 4 instances of epidemics in the last ten years leading to 23 deaths and medical expenditure of Rs.2 lakhs.

· The General Hospital at Parbhani has compiled an Emergency Action Plan for control of epidemics which may occur floods.

· There is only one Poison Centre and Blood Bank in the whole district at Parbhani.

· Although there has been no case of food poisoning as yet, a major event could considerably stretch the resources of this single poison centre.

Road Accidents

· There are a total of 6824 km of roads in the district out of which 556 km are of state highways and 5000km of Zilla Parishad.

· There are no National Highways passing through the district.

· Till March 1994, there were 22,357 registered vehicles in the district of which two wheelers (motorcycles, scooters, mopeds etc.) account for more than 77%.

· There were 905 registered transport vehicles in the district.

· Parbhani is the main industrial centre in the district and there is considerable outflow and inflow of raw material and goods.

· However the materials transported are not of hazardous nature, as there are no potentially hazardous industries in the district.

· Even then the district administration considers road accidents to have a high probability for future occurrence.

¨ There are 43 road side settlements/villages which are vulnerable in case of any major accident.

¨ There are 46 unmanned railway crossings which constitute a latent hazard.

¨ Increased industrialisation in the district is bound to result in increased traffic of passengers as well as goods.

¨ Although there are no major hazardous industries at present and inflow and outflow of hazardous materials is minimal, with more and more MIDCs coming up there are bound to be chemical factories in these estates.

¨ There are only two fire brigades (Parbhani and Jintur) which at the present juncture seems reasonable.

Fires

· Risk of major industrial fires affecting a large number of population is low in the district.

· The number of toxic and chemical industries is very less.

· There are no settlements around major factories and industrial areas.

· Transport of hazardous materials by road is also very less.

· LPG dealerships/godowns in the major urban centres where population density is more than 2000 constitute a major fire hazard.

· There have been a total of 77 road accidents and fires in the district in the last 10 years resulting in 77 deaths.

· The present infrastructure of dealing with fires seems adequate with two fire stations (Parbhani and Jintur).

Industrial and Chemical Accidents

· Parbhani is not one of the more industrialised districts in Maharashtra.

· There are only two working MIDC estates at Parbhani and Hingoli. Only MIDC Parbhani has toxic and chemical industries numbering 5.

· Major types of industries in both the estates include agrobased, engineering, oil mills, cement pipes, fabrication, biscuits, electrical industries etc.

· Two industries within MIDC Parbhani, Mathura Extraction - which stores hexane -and Gajanan Chemicals -which stores significant amount of chlorine- are considered as hazardous locations.

· Godavari Gas Agencies and Shivaji Gas Services -which store large quantities of LPG - are potential hazardous locations. However, since both the godowns are in Parbhani MIDC and away from residential areas, the danger to settlements is minimal.

· There have been no accidents in industries in the past and the possibility of a major accident affecting a large section of the population in the future is low.

· Hence the present infrastructure with only two fire stations at Parbhani and Jintur seems adequate to deal with emergencies

· With rapid development and more industrial estates coming up in the district, there are chances of hazardous industries being set up, thus increasing the risk of industrial accidents.

· The infrastructure for fire fighting, police, medical services, community awareness, around these industrial estates needs to be strengthened for an effective response to industrial disasters.

Earthquakes

· Parbhani district does not have a history of earthquakes; there are no seismic events in the past.

· The Sept 30, 1993 earthquake at Killari was felt here, but no damage was caused except for small cracks to a few houses.

· A major earthquake with epicentre in the northern part of Latur district, - albeit a remote possibility - will significantly affect the talukas of Gangakhed, Pathri and Parbhani.

Disaster Probability

The following table gives the possible effects future disasters will have :

Damage
Earthquake
Floods
Cyclones
Epidemics
Industrial
and
Chemical
Accidents
Fires
Road Accidents
Loss of Lives Medium
Low
Medium Medium Low Low Medium
Injuries Medium NIL
Medium NIL
Low Medium High
Damage to and Destruction of Property High Low Low NIL Low Low Low
Damage to
cattle and
livestock
Medium Medium Medium Medium NIL Low Low
Damage to subsistence
and crops
Medium High Medium NIL NIL Medium ----
Disruption of
life style
High Medium Medium ----- ----- Medium Medium
Disruption of community life High Medium Medium ----- ----- Medium Medium
Loss of Livelihood High Medium Medium ----- ----- Medium Low
Disruption of services High Medium Medium NIL NIL Medium Low
Damage to  infrastructure and/or disruption of government systems High Medium Medium Low NIL Medium Low
Impact on National Economy High Medium Medium Medium NIL Medium Low
Social and Psychological after-effects Medium NIL NIL Low NIL Medium Low

 


Specific Vulnerability Of Systems And Services To Disaster Events

Specific
Vulnerability
of
Vulnerable to
Earthquakes
Floods
Cyclones
Epidemics
Fires
Road Accidents
Industrial & Chemical Accidents
Transport systems (road network) Yes ---- ---- Yes ---- ---- ----

Transport systems (rail network)

---- ---- ---- Yes ---- ---- ----
Power supply Yes ---- ---- Yes ---- ---- ----
Water supply Yes Yes ---- Yes ---- ---- ----
Sewage Yes ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Hospitals Yes ---- ---- Yes ---- Yes ----
Food stocks and supplies ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----

Communica-tion systems
(telecommunication)

Yes Yes Yes ---- ---- Yes ----

Ranking And Probability Of Disaster Episodes

Event
Ranking of events in terms of past occurrence

Probability of future occurrence

High
Medium
Low
Cyclones     Yes
 
Epidemics     Yes
 
Floods Second
  Yes
 
Fires
Third
  Yes
 
Road Accidents
Fourth
Yes
   
Earthquake Top
  Yes
 
Industrial and Chemical Accidents
      Yes


Annexure I - Case Studies Of Disaster Episodes

The following case studies illustrate the kind of hazards faced by Parbhani district in the past, the nature of damage caused, the administrative response, and most importantly any shortcomings with regard to the infrastructure available to respond more effectively.

Floods

Episode 1

Due to the heavy rains occurred on 23rd and 24th July 1989 all the Nalas/Rivers in the Dist. were flowing with flooded water and release of waters from the Majalgaon Dam in Beed Dist. And Yeldari and Sidheshwar in Parbhani Dist. which resulted the calamity, 9 villages were engulfed with waters, all communications were cut off and 24 villages were severely affected, 3 human lives lost in this floods 7846 persons were evacuated and shifted to 26 temporary shelters. Therefore, to assess the losses. A Dy. Collector for each taluka was appointed who formulated teams assessing all the types of damages as shown above, with the assistance of the Tahasildar, Block Development Officer, Sub-Div. Soil Conservation Officer, Dy. Engineers of P.W.D and Irrigation Dept. and the Police.

The action taken by Dist. Administration with the help of other Depts. could save the human losses.

1. Types of Episode : Floods due to heavy rains.

2. Location : 460 Villages

3. Date : 23rd & 24th July 1989.

4. Reasons assigned for : Heavy rains in various parts of the district the event

Rivers in the Dist. flooded due to heavy rains and flooded water released from Dams.

5. Warning Systems : A Comprehensive Disaster Plan is always prepared each year taluka-wise where Control Room is opened in each Tahsil Office. The Warnings received to the collector office i.e. Dist.Control room, is communicated to the Control Rooms at Tahsil Control rooms, the Tahsildars communicates, such warnings to the Revenue field staff, who in turn propagate the same in the villages and takes necessary steps, like evacuation of habitants residing in the low lying areas, or near the banks of Rivers/Nalas. This practice was used. However the intensity of this calamity was wide spread covering all most all villages in the District.

6. Damage Caused :

The losses occurred in the calamity are as below.

i) No. of villages Affected . : 460

ii) Population Affected. : 1,42,273

iii) No. of human lives lost. : 3

iv) No. of destitutes. : 1,615

v) Crops affected Area. : 24,96,581 Ha.

vi) Value of Crop’s damage. : 3,17,85,025 Rs.

vii) No. of affected Cultivators. : 24,960

viii) Agricultural land damage. : 2,893 Ha.

ix) Value of land damage. : 17,72,390 Rs.

x) Agricultural land severely damaged : 79.17 Ha.

xi) Value of land severely damaged. : 12,68,000 Rs.

xii) No. of Cattle lost. : 77

xiii) No. of Sheeps/Goats lost. : 154

xiv) Value of Cattle loss. : 1,64,250 Rs.

xv) Value of Sheeps/Goats : 39,650 Rs.

xvi) No. of houses damaged :

Type No.of houses Value in Rs.
Partially 2552 7,41,425
Fully 348 4,62,000
Cattle Sheds 32 10,808

xvii) Agricultural damages such as : Electric Motors, Starters, implements

Type No.of houses Value in Rs.
Wells 54  
E-Motors 54 3,39,000
Implements 32  

xviii) Other losses :20,000 Rs.

xix) Losses / damages to public : 7,24,61,500 Rs.

utilities such as roads, building etc.

_________________________________________________________

Total Losses 10,50,64,840 Rs.

__________________________________________________________

Episode 2

1.Type of Episode : Heavy rains & Flood

2.Location : Suppa Tq. Gangakhed

3.Date : 23/07/1988

4.Reasons for the event : Due to heavy rains in the catchment area

of percolation Tank No.2 Suppa Tq.Gangakhed, broken away.

5.Warning System used : On seeing the high velocity of water due to heavy rains. The Talathi of Revenue Dept. and other officials had alerted the residents about the likelihood of a calamity and shifted the persons living near the tank and through a special messenger also intimated the Tahasildar Gangakhed about the situation. The Tahsildar Gangakhed deployed other staff, however the wall of Tank totally collapsed in the night of 23/09/1988. The Govt. Machinery succeeded in saving the lives of people, however one women drowned in the speedy flowing water.

6. Damages Caused : The losses occurred in this calamity are shown below.

i) Loss of lives : 1 ( Woman )

ii) Loss of crops : 149.50 Ha.

iii) Damages to lands : 79.17 Ha.

iv) Loss of live stocks : 8

v) Loss of houses : Nil

Episode 3

1.Types of Episode : Floods due to heavy rains.

2.Reasons assigned for the : High velocity of water due to heavy event. rains.

3.Warning system used : The Concerned Revenue officials intimated the calamity to Tahasildar through a message and in turn the Tahsildar informed the same to the Dist. Collector on Phone. The Revenue officials had alerted the people residing at village about likely danger to the Tank due to high velocity of water and taken steps to evacuate the persons, likely to be in danger, the Govt. Machinery could succeed in saving lives of People, resulting only no human loss.

4. Damage Caused

The losses in this calamity occurred is as follows.

i) Human lives : Nil

ii) Losses of crops : 234.68 Ha.

iii) Land damages : 69.35 Ha.

iv) Losses of live stock : Nil

v) Losses of houses : Nil

Episode 4

1.Types of Episode : Floods due to heavy rains.

2.Reasons assigned for the: High velocity of water due to heavy

event. rains resulting collapse of walls of tank.

3.Warning system used : As stated in the above two episodes.

4. Damage Caused : The losses occurred, in the event are as under.

i) Human loss : Nil

ii) Losses of Crops : 159.45 Ha.

iii) Land damages : 3.70 Ha.

iv) Losses of live stock : Nil

v) Losses of houses : Nil

Administrative Preparedness For Flood Events:

It is a general practice adopted in the Dist. each year that the village level officials and non officials are given instructions to remain present at their head quarters, during monsoon, particularly when they are alerted about heavy rains, through any source, even T.V./Radios News bulletins. They are well instructed about action to be taken at the event of calamity. This practice was followed at the time of above calamities. More emphasis, on checking of such Dams, Tanks, before rainy season and carry out necessary repairs by the concerned Dept. in found necessary to avert such events.

Cyclones

1.Types of Episodes : Cyclones and hail storm.

2.Location : Villages in 1) Parbhani 2) Hingoli

3) Sengaon 4) Aundha & 5) Kalamnuri Taluqas.

3.Date : 13/03/1995

4.Reasons assigned for the: Natural reasons. event.

5.Warning system used : This instance occurred all of a sudden, hence warning system could be used.

6. Damage Caused :

The cyclone with Hailstorm occurred on 13/03/1995 in some parts of the district covering 5 out of 12 Talukas in the Dist. The survey of damages and losses carried out by forming teams by the respective Tahsildars of Talukas. The losses occurred are as below.

i) Human Loss : 1

ii) Losses of Cattle : 1 ( Rs. 3000 /- )

iii) Losses of Sheep/ Goats : 66 ( Rs. 27,450 /-)

iv) Crops damages : 1082.67 Ha. ( Rs.10,43,750 /-)

v) Horticulture Bagayat Crops : 83.65 Ha. ( Rs. 3,06,250 /-)

vi) Damages to Houses : 26 ( Rs. 45,350 /- )

Earthquake

The earthquake occurred in Latur and Osmanabad Dist. on 30/09/93 had some impact on this district, but no sizable losses occurred, excepting that some of the houses developed cracks. Hence no such event is quoted in the format.

Epidemics

Episode 1

1.Type of Episode : Gastro

2.Location : Wandan, Gangakhed Tq. Bori, Jintur Tq, and Mannos Pimpri Hingoli Tq.

3.Date : 1991

4.Reasons assigned for the:Due to contamination of Drinking Water event.

5.Warning systems used : The local Police Patil, Talathi and Gram Sevak had informed about the incident, through special messenger to the Tahasildar/ BDO and also to the Medical Officer of PHC concerned.

A Medical team with required medicine and Bleaching Powder etc was deputed to the spot. 38 persons at Wandan & 54 persons at Bori were affected at each place one person died in this calamity.

Episode 2

1.Type of Episode : Cholera.

2.Location : Pokharni Tq. Parbhani.

3.Date : 1993

4.Reasons assigned for the : Contamination of Drinking water. event.

5.Warning systems used : As explained above.

72 Persons were affected by Cholera . The Medical Team was deputed for treatment however one person died in this epidemic.

Road Accidents

Episode 1

Type of Episode : Accident to a Vehicle.

Location : Jintur Tq,

Date : 1987

Reasons assigned for the : Drivers fault event.

Warning systems used : No.

The accident occurred due to rash driving in which six persons died at the spot.

Episode 2

Type of Episode : Accident to a Vehicle.

Location : Sonpeth Tq,

Date : 1992

Reasons assigned for the : Drivers fault event.

Warning systems used : No.

In this accident 17 persons died and 7 were injured. This accident occurred due to rash driving.

Episode 3

Type of Episode : Accident to a Vehicle.

Location : Kalamnuri Tq,

Reasons assigned for the : Drivers fault event.

Warning systems used : No.

The accident occurred due to rash driving in which 4 persons died and 8 were injured.

Episode 4

Type of Episode : Accident to a Vehicle.

Location : Mardasgaon Gangakhed Tq,

Date : 1984

Reasons assigned for the : Drivers fault event.

Warning systems used : Message given in person to the Tahasildar by a person on Motor Cycle.

The accident occurred due to rash driving of a driver of a truck in which approximately 80 persons were travelling. 11 persons died in this accident.

On receiving information all the injured persons were shifted to Gangakhed, Rural Hospital by the Tahasildar. After First Aid treatment these injured persons were shifted to Civil Hospital Parbhani. 4 persons died at spot and 7 died in the Hospital when undergoing treatment.

Fires

Episode 1

Fire occurred on 14/04/89 to a truck No. MWP - 9529 at Parbhani.

Type of Episode : Fire to a truck . ( In which 90 children were travelling in this procession.)

Location : Nanal Peth, Parbhani City.

Date : 14/04/89 at 7.00 P. M.

Reasons assigned for the : Overheating of Engine. event.

Warning systems used : No.

The truck was in the procession of Dr. Babasaheb Ambedkar Jayanti Celebrations in which about 90 children were travelling. The said procession came at Nanal peth in the heart of Parbhani city and caught fire,

The rescue operation were carried on immediately as Dist. heads i.e. the Collector, the S.P. and there Subordinate officers were present to handle the procession. 15 children died at the spot and 28 children expired, during treatment by to 30/05/89. Total 43 children were killed in this fire episode. 17 children met with minor injuries, 11 had medium type injuries and 3 had serious injuries. Total 31 children were injured.

Annexure II Fact Sheets On Hazardous Industries

Fact Sheet 1

I. Factory identity :- M/s Gajanan Chemicals

II. Address :- Plot No. A-38, MIDC Area, Parbhani

III. Location (mention the industrial estate if applicable) :- MIDC Parbhani

IV. Contact Persons :- Shri R.M. Sawle, Plot No. A-38 MIDC Parbhani ( Ph.No.48217)

V. Principle activity(ies) for each plant :- Production of stable bleaching powder

VI. Inventory of the hazardous chemicals (raw materials, intermediate products,final products and wastes)

Name of the Chemical

Quantity stored

Storage method and mode

Quantity of chemical in the processing system

 Chlorine Gas 

1. pp M.T.       

In cylinders  & Factory Premises

0.40  M.T.


VII. Consequences of major hazards from storage for each chemical :- In the radius of 200 Meters.

III. Consequences of major hazards from processing :- as above.

IX. Physical range of consequences :- ---- Not applicable

X. An inventory of personal protective equipment in the factory premises: N. A.

XI. Action required :

· Fire brigade - Phone No.20101 (Nagar Parishad, Parbhani)

· Police service - Phone No. 20170 (Mondha Police Station, Parbhani)

· Medical Services -Phone No. 20037 (Civil Hospital, Parbhani)

· Communication services -Phone No. 23696 ( S.T. Stand, Parbhani)

Phone No. 23131 (Railway Station, Parbhani.)

XII. Estimated Response time : 10 Minutes

XIII. Layouts of the plants (to be updated as and when expansions/modernization occur) Lay-out enclosed

XIV. Chemical And Gas pipelines : N. A.

XV. Vehicles for transportation : N. A.

XVI. Parking :- N. A.

Fact Sheet 2

I. Factory identity :- M/s Kamala Metal Processors

II. Address :- Plot No. A-26/1 MIDC , Parbhani ( Ph. No. 48686 )

III. Location (mention the industrial estate if applicable) :- MIDC Parbhani

IV. Contact Persons :- Shri R.M. Patel C/o Vishnu Ginning Mill, Parbhani

Phone No. 23455

V. Principle activity(ies) for each plant :- Metal Powder.

VI. Inventory of the hazardous chemicals (raw materials, intermediate products, final products and wastes)

Name of the Chemical

Quantity stored

Storage method and mode

Quantity of chemical in the processing system

  Ammonia Gas        

1.00 M.T.

In cylinders in  tin Shed

0.10  M.T.


VII. Consequences of major hazards from storage for each chemical :- In the radius of 200 Meters.

VIII. Consequences of major hazards from processing :- as above.

IX. Physical range of consequences :- ---- Not applicable

X. An inventory of personal protective equipment in the factory premises. : N. A.

XI. Action required : N. A.

· Fire brigade - Phone No.20101 (Nagar Parishad, Parbhani)

· Police service -Phone No. 20170 (Mondha Police Station, Parbhani)

· Medical Services -Phone No. 20037 (Civil Hospital, Parbhani)

· Communication services -Phone No. 23696 ( S.T. Stand, Parbhani)

· Phone No. 23131 (Railway Station, Parbhani.)

XII. Estimated Response time : 10 Minutes

XIII. Layouts of the plants (to be updated as and when expansions/modernization occur) Lay-out enclosed

XIV. Chemical And Gasses pipeline : N. A.

XV. Vehicles for transportation : N. A.

XVI. Parking :- N. A.

Fact Sheet 3

I. Factory identity :- M/s Mathura Extraction MIDC Parbhani

II. Address :- Plot No. A-20, 21 MIDC Parbhani - 431 401

Phone Nos. 48155, 48105, 48115

III. Location (mention the industrial estate if applicable) :- MIDC Parbhani

IV. Contact Persons :- Shri Harish Kanchan Katrnwar (Ph.No. 23772)

V. Principle activity(ies) for each plant :- Extraction & Oil

VI. Inventory of the hazardous chemicals (raw materials, intermediate products, final products and wastes)

Name of the Chemical

Quantity stored

Storage method and mode

Quantity of chemical in the processing system

Hexane

24000 K.Lit

Underground Tank

 8000 K.Lit           


VII. Consequences of major hazards from storage for each chemical :-Fire with explosion

VIII. Consequences of major hazards from processing - Out break of fire with explosion.

IX. Physical range of consequences :- In the radius of 200 Meters.

X. An inventory of personal protective equipment in the factory premises. : N. A.

XI. Action required : N. A.

· Fire brigade - Phone No.20101 (Nagar Parishad, Parbhani)

· Police service -Phone No. 20170 (Mondha Police Station, Parbhani)

· Medical Services -Phone No. 20037 (Civil Hospital, Parbhani)

· Communication services -Phone No. 23696 ( S.T. Stand, Parbhani)

· Phone No. 23131 (Railway Station, Parbhani.)

XII. Estimated Response time : 10 Minutes

XIII. Layouts of the plants (to be updated as and when expansions/modernization occur) Lay-out enclosed

XIV. Chemical And Gas pipelines : N. A.

XV. Vehicles for transportation : N. A.

XVI. Parking :- N. A.

Fact Sheet 4

I. Factory identity :- M/s Godawari Gas Agency

II. Address :- Plot No. A-40 MIDC, Parbhani - 431 401

III. Location (mention the industrial estate if applicable) :- MIDC Parbhani

IV. Contact Persons :- Shri Ratanlal G. Mudada Subash Road, Parbhani

V. Principle activity(ies) for each plant :- Stocking of L.P.G. Gas Cylinders.

VI. Inventory of the hazardous chemicals (raw materials, intermediate products, final products and wastes)

Name of the Chemical

Quantity stored

Storage method and mode

Quantity of chemical in the processing system

 L.P.G. Gas          

4.50 M.T.

R..C.C. Godown

Nil


VII. Consequences of major hazards from storage for each chemical :-Explosion with out break of fire.

VIII. Consequences of major hazards from processing :- Yes

IX. Physical range of consequences :- In the radius of 200 Meters.

X. An inventory of personal protective equipment in the factory premises. : N. A.

XI. Action required : N. A.

· Fire brigade - Phone No.20101 (Nagar Parishad, Parbhani)

· Police service -Phone No. 20170 (Mondha Police Station, Parbhani)

· Medical Services -Phone No. 20037 (Civil Hospital, Parbhani)

· Communication services -Phone No. 23696 ( S.T. Stand, Parbhani)

· Phone No. 23131 (Railway Station, Parbhani.)

XII. Estimated Response time : 10 Minutes

XIII. Layouts of the plants (to be updated as and when expansions/modernization

occur) Lay-out enclosed

XIV. Chemical And Gasses pipeline : N. A.

XV. Vehicles for transportation : N. A.

XVI. Parking :- N. A.

Fact Sheet 5

I. Factory identity :- M/s Shivaji Gas Services.

II. Address :- Plot No. C-31 MIDC Parbhani - 431 401

III. Location (mention the industrial estate if applicable) :- MIDC Parbhani

IV. Contact Persons :- Shri S.S. Deshmukh Supermarket, Parbhani - 431 401Phone No. 21498

V. Principle activity(ies) for each plant :- Godown of L.P.G.

VI. Inventory of the hazardous chemicals (raw materials, intermediate products, final products and wastes)

Name of the Chemical

Quantity stored

Storage method and mode

Quantity of chemical in the processing system

 L.P.G.  Gas          

4.50 M.T.

Cylinder kept in

R.C.C. Godown

             Nil


VII. Consequences of major hazards from storage for each chemical: Explosion with out break of fire.

VIII. Consequences of major hazards from processing:- Yes.

IX. Physical range of consequences :- In the radius of 200 Meters.

X. An inventory of personal protective equipment in the factory premises. : N. A.

XI. Action required : N. A.

· Fire brigade -Phone No.20101 (Nagar Parishad, Parbhani)

· Police service -Phone No. 20170 (Mondha Police Station, Parbhani)

· Medical Services -Phone No. 20037 (Civil Hospital, Parbhani)

· Communication services -Phone No. 23696 ( S.T. Stand, Parbhani)

Phone No. 23131 (Railway Station, Parbhani.)

XII. Estimated Response time : 10 Minutes

XIII. Layouts of the plants (to be updated as and when expansions/modernization occur) Lay-out enclosed

XIV. Chemical And Gas pipeline : N. A.

XV. Vehicles for transportation : N. A.

XVI. Parking :- N. A.

CAPABILITY ANALYSIS

Inventory and Evaluation of resources

Inventory and evaluation of resources is necessary for assessing the capacity of the district to respond effectively to different types of disasters, and more specifically to the disasters that the district is specifically vulnerable to.

The detailed inventory of resources along with the locations, and contact phone numbers of the authorities in- charge are given in Section X, and an evaluation of those resources is presented here.

In the case of Parbhani district, the capability is judged primarily in terms of the ability of the district administration to respond to floods, road accidents, and epidemics. During a disaster, both governmental and non-governmental (include private) resources are planned to be mobilised. The list of resources available with the government and other agencies is given on the following pages.

Communication and Media

Monitoring, Prediction and Warning systems

Technological support available at district level for monitoring, predicting and warning systems for specific disasters

Disaster

Monitoring Stations (number and locations - to show on a map)

Monitoring Instruments, provide a description

Warning Systems and Technology

Department/Agency

Earthquake

             NIL

            NIL 

Through Police,

wireless and phones

Dist. Collector

Floods

Meteorological   Dept.

Water level

Wireless,

Phones

Irrigation

Cyclones

             NIL

             NIL

Wireless,

Radios

Maharashtra Govt.

Epidemics

P.H.C. & Civil

Hospitals

Health 

Laboratories

Phones,

Wireless

D.H.O

Industrial and Chemical Accidents

NIL

NIL

NIL

 MIDC

Fires

Municipal   Council,

Parbhani.

Jintur.

Fire Brigade

Phone,

Wireless

Municipal  Council,

Parbhani.

 Jintur.

Road Accidents

Police  Stations

Check Post

Wireless,

Phones

Police


Mass Media

Apart from the technological support available, the mass media can be used for delivering warning and alert messages to the community.

No. of local newspapers 14 (Daily) 114 (Weekly)

Number of radio stations 1

Number of TV transmission centres 1

Number of cable operators/customers 127 / 2480

Administrative Preparedness

Control Room in the district

A Control room is established during the monsoon months of June to October in the Collectorate and also in each tahsil office and sub-divisional office. Staff is deployed round the clock, and the control room is provided with a telephone, and messengers with a vehicle.

Existing Emergency Action Plans

· A master plan for mitigation of flood hazards is already in existence.

· This disaster plan envisages a village level committee comprising of the Sarpanch, Police Patil, Talathis, and Gram Sevaks.

· Moreover, before the advent of the monsoon season, a meeting is convened by the collector of all the Tahsildars, who are asked to prepare a list of villages likely to be flooded, the population (human/cattle) of each, availability of the near by medical services and police stations, list of expert swimmers, demarcation of safe places for evacuation etc.

· The General Hospital, Parbhani has also prepared an Action Plan for effective medical help during natural disasters.

· However a multi hazard response plan has not been prepared in the district.

Community Education and Preparedness Programmes

· Besides formation of village level committees for co-ordination during rescue and evacuation, no other community education preparedness programmes are undertaken by the district administration.

Implementation of Land Use Regulations and Zoning

· Zoning practices especially in flood prone areas are followed with the standard blue zone and red zone demarcations. No new constructions being allowed in these zones.

Disaster Specific Capability Analysis

Floods and Cyclones (Hailstorms)

· Parbhani district has a recurrent problem of floods with large parts of the district being flooded every monsoon - the list of villages is given in section III.

· There is a Disaster Master Plan for floods already prepared.

· Control Room is established in the Collectorate during the monsoon months of June to October and works round the clock. Similar control rooms equipped with a telephone and special messengers are also established in each tahsil office and sub-divisional office.

· The Irrigation department maintains a wireless network with it’s flood monitoring stations.

· Village commitees are constituted to help in evacuation and relief work.

· Land use regulations with respect to flood prone areas has been rigorously followed which has helped in minimising damage.

· Kolhapur type dams, Flood protection walls are also being constructed at a few places.

· There are 7 Rainfall Monitoring Stations and 5 Flood Monitoring Stations within the district.

· For hailstorms, there is no effective warning system designed with the help of the Meteorological department.

Epidemics

· All the flood prone villages enlisted earlier are potential risk areas for epidemics during the monsoon. There have been only 4 instances of epidemics in the last ten years leading to 23 deaths and medical expenditure of Rs.2 lakhs.

· The General Hospital at Parbhani has compiled an Emergency Action Plan for control of epidemics which may occur during floods.

· There is only one Poison Centre and Blood Bank in the whole district at Parbhani. Although there has been no case of food poisoning as yet, a major event could considerably stretch the resources of this single poison centre.

Fires and Industrial Accidents

· The present infrastructure of dealing with fires seems adequate with two fire stations (Parbhani and Jintur).

Preparedness Measures undertaken by Departments

In addition to the administrative preparedness measures, the district control room will receive reports on preparedness from the relevant district level departments and other departments, as per the details given below. This will enable the District Collector to analyse the capabilities and preparedness measures of various departments and report on the same to the Emergency Operations Centre, Relief Commissioner and Divisional Commissioner.

Preparedness Checklist for Police (to be filled in by the Department Head and submitted to the District Collector every six months)

Preparedness measures taken

Details/Remarks

The  department is familiar with  disaster response plan and disaster response procedures are clearly defined

Orientation and training for disaster response plan and procedures  undertaken

Special skills required during emergency operations imparted to the officials and the staff.

Reviewed  and updated

·         Precautionary measures and procedures

·         the precautions to be taken to protect equipment 

·         the post-disaster  procedures to be followed.

Adequate warning mechanisms established for evacuation

A officer has been designated as Nodal Officer for Disaster Management

Sources of materials required for response operations have been identified

Reported By :

Designation

Signature

Date

Preparedness Checklist for Public Health Department (to be filled in by the Civil Surgeon and District Health Officer and submitted to the DCR every six months)

Preparedness Measures taken

Details/ Remarks

The  department is familiar with  disaster response plan and disaster response procedures are clearly defined

A hospital plan for the facilities, equipment and staff of that particular hospital based on “The Guide to Health Management in Disasters” has been developed.

Orientation and training for disaster response plan and procedures undertaken

Special skills required during disaster situations  are imparted to the officials and the staff.

Hospital staff are aware of which hospital rooms/ buildings are damage-proof.

Reviewed  and updated

·         precautionary measures and procedures

·         the precautions that have  to be taken to protect equipment

·         the post-disaster  procedures to be followed.

All hospitals’ staff have been informed about the possible disasters in the district, likely damages and effects,        and information about ways to protect life, equipment and property.

An area of the hospital identified for receiving large numbers of casualties.

Emergency admission procedures with adequate record keeping developed.

Field staff oriented about 

·         DDMAP

·         standards of services,

·         procedures for   tagging.

A officer has been designated as Nodal Officer for Disaster Management

Sources of materials required for response operations have been identified


Reported By :

Designation Signature Date

Preparedness Checklist for MSEB (to be filled in by the Department Head and submitted to the District Collector every six months)

Preparedness measures taken

Details/Remarks

The  department is familiar with disaster response plan and  disaster response procedures are clearly defined 

Orientation and training for disaster response plan and procedures  undertaken

Special skills required during emergency operations imparted to the officials and the staff.

Reviewed  and updated

·         Precautionary measures and procedures

·         the precautions to be taken to protect equipment 

·         the post-disaster  procedures to be followed.

A officer has been designated as Nodal Officer for Disaster Management

Sources of materials required for response operations have been identified

Reported By :

Designation

Signature

Date

Preparedness Checklist for Maharashtra Jeevan Pradikaran (to be filled in by the Department Head and submitted to the District Collector every six months)

Preparedness Measures Taken

Details/Remarks

The  department is familiar with  disaster response plan and disaster response procedures are clearly defined

Orientation and training for disaster response plan and procedures undertaken

Special skills required during emergency operations imparted to the officials and the staff.

Reviewed  and updated

·         Precautionary measures and procedures

·         the precautions to be taken to protect equipment 

·         the post-disaster  procedures to be followed.

Adequate warning mechanisms for informing   people to store an emergency supply of drinking water have been developed.

Procedures established for the emergency distribution of water if existing supply is disrupted.

A officer has been designated as Nodal Officer for Disaster Management

Sources of materials required for response operations have been identified


Reported By :

Designation

Signature

Date

Preparedness Checklist for Irrigation Department (to be filled in by the Department Head and submitted to the District Collector every six months)

Preparedness measures taken

Details/Remarks

The  department is familiar with  disaster response plan and disaster response procedures are clearly defined

Orientation and training for disaster response plan and procedures undertaken

Special skills required during emergency operations imparted to the officials and the staff.

Reviewed  and updated

·         Precautionary measures and procedures

·         the precautions to be taken to protect equipment 

·         the post-disaster  procedures to be followed.

Flood monitoring mechanisms can be activated in all flood prone areas from 1st  of June.

All staff are well aware of precautions to be taken to protect their lives and personal property.

Each technical assistant has  instructions and knows operating procedures for disaster conditions.

Methods of monitoring and impounding the levels in the tanks evolved. 

Methods of alerting officers on other dam sites  and the district control room, established

Mechanisms evolved for

·         forewarning  settlements in the downstream

·         evacuation

·         coordination with other dam authorities

A officer has been designated as Nodal Officer for Disaster Management

Sources of materials required for response operations have been identified


Reported By :

Designation

Signature

Date

Preparedness Checklist for Telecommunications (to be filled in by the Department Head and submitted to the District Collector every six months)

Preparedness measures taken

Details/Remarks

The  department is familiar with disaster response plan and  disaster response procedures are clearly defined 

 

Orientation and training for disaster response plan and procedures  undertaken

Special skills required during emergency operations imparted to the officials and the staff.

 

Reviewed  and updated

·         Precautionary measures and procedures

·         the precautions to be taken to protect equipment 

·         the post-disaster  procedures to be followed.

 

A officer has been designated as Nodal Officer for Disaster Management

 

Sources of materials required for response operations have been identified

 


Reported By :

Designation

Signature

Date

Preparedness Checklist for PWD (to be filled in by the Department Head and submitted to the District Collector every six months)

Preparedness Measures taken

Details/Remarks

The  department is familiar with  disaster response plan and disaster response procedures are clearly defined

 

Orientation and training for disaster response plan and procedures  undertaken

Special skills required during emergency operations imparted to the officials and the staff.

 

Reviewed  and updated

·         Precautionary measures and procedures

·         the precautions to be taken to protect equipment 

·         the post-disaster  procedures to be followed.

 

All officers are familiar with pre-disaster  precautions and post-disaster procedures for road clearing and for defining safe evacuation routes where necessary.

 

A officer has been designated as Nodal Officer for Disaster Management

 

Sources of materials required for response operations have been identified

 


Reported By :

Designation

Signature

Date

Preparedness Checklist for Agriculture Department (to be filled in by the Department Head and submitted to the District Collector every six months)

Preparedness Measures taken

Details/Remarks

The  department is familiar with  disaster response plan and disaster response procedures are clearly defined

 

Orientation and training for disaster response plan and procedures  undertaken

Special skills required during emergency operations imparted to the officials and the staff.

 

Reviewed  and updated

·         Precautionary measures and procedures

·         the precautions to be taken to protect equipment 

·         the post-disaster  procedures to be followed.

 

Information provided to all concerned  about the disasters, likely damages to crops and plantations,   and information about ways to protect the same.

 

The  NGOs and other relief organisations are informed about  the resources of the department

 

A officer has been designated as Nodal Officer for Disaster Management

 

Sources of materials required for response operations have been identified

 


Reported By :

Designation

Signature

Date

Preparedness Checklist for Animal Husbandry Department (to be filled in by the Department Head and submitted to the District Collector every six months)

Preparedness measures taken

Details/Remarks

The  department is familiar with  disaster response plan and disaster response procedures are clearly defined

 

Orientation and training for disaster response plan and procedures undertaken

Special skills required during emergency operations imparted to the officials and the staff.

 

Reviewed  and updated

·         Precautionary measures and procedures

·         the precautions to be taken to protect equipment 

·         the post-disaster  procedures to be followed.

 

Hospital staff are aware of which hospital rooms/ buildings are damage-proof.

 

All veterinary hospitals and centres’ staff have been informed about the possible disasters, likely damages and effects,   and information about ways to protect life, equipment and property.

 

An  area of the hospital identified for receiving large numbers of livestock.

 

Emergency admission procedures with adequate record keeping developed .

 

A officer has been designated as Nodal Officer for Disaster Management

 

Sources of materials required for response operations have been identified

 


Reported By :

Designation

Signature

Date

Public and Private Resources Inventory

Resource inventory consisting of manpower, transport, infrastructure and equipment for both private and public institutions including NGOs indicates the response capacity of the district. These have been given in the following tables. Keeping the specific vulnerability of the district to various disasters the information has been analysed.

Infrastructure available

Considering the government and private sector resources, the capability of the district and the resource availability is summarised below

Manpower

The number of NGOs working in the district : 15

Staff available with NGOs : 300

Private Hospitals : 132

Police Service Personnel : 1985

Fire Brigade personnel : 8

Health Service personnel : 1404

Defence Service Personnel : ---

Home Guards personnel : 1313

Infrastructure

Number of towns with Fire Brigade service : 2

Number of Private Hospitals with Surgery Facility : 30

Number of Public Hospitals with Surgery Facility and Ambulance Service : 2

Number of ambulances with private organisations : 5

Number of ambulances with public organisations : 15

Number of X-ray machines with private institutions : 7

Number of X-ray machines with public institutions : 11

Number of blood banks with private institutions : 1

Number of blood banks with public institutions : 1

Number of beds with private hospitals : 650

Number of beds with public organisations : N.A.

Public Hospitals : N.A.

Police : N.A.

Number of trauma care centres in private hospitals : Nil

Number of trauma care centres in public hospitals : Nil

Number ofpoison care centres in public hospitals : Nil

Number of pathological labs with private organisations : 6

Number of pathological labs with public organisations : 9

Number of boats : Nil

Technology Support

· Satellite Communication link with State Headquarters and Taluka office.

· Wireless communication accessible

· Telephones in all taluka headquarters.

· Fax machines in all taluka headquarters.

Special Equipment available at the district level

 Specialized  Equipment

Numbers

Department/Organization

Earth-moving equipment

Nil

 

Drilling rigs

Envaled drilling  rigs  ( 4 “ Dia )

02

01

G.S.D.A.,  Parbhani.

G.S.D.A., Parbhani.

Mobile Cranes

Nil

 

Mobile X-ray units

Nil

 

Mobile Trauma Care centres

Nil

 

No. of  Portland earth mover

05

Private Agencies

No. of  Road  Roller

23

P.W.D. Parbhani

No. of  Trucks / Tippers

07

07

E.E. M.I.( Z.P ) Parbhani

E.E. M.I. ( State ) Parbhani

No. of  Water Tankers

02

E.E. M.I. ( State ) Parbhani

No. of  D.R.R. 

03

E.E. M.I. ( State ) Parbhani

No. of  Jeeps

08

E.E. M.I. ( State ) Parbhani


Adequacy of Existing Inventory for Disaster Management

The equipment available with the district administration for dealing with floods - the major hazard in the district- is more or less adequate. However there is need for more boats, more trained manpower, fire brigade staff.

Equipment which is useful in other disaster also like earthmoving machinery, bulldozers etc. are adequately available with the govt departments and private agencies.

However emergency medical facilities like trauma care centres, poison centres, mobile x-ray units, mobile water quality monitoring centres are slightly scarce and need to be increased in numbers.

MITIGATION STRATEGY

Requirements of the district in Responding to Future Disasters

This section highlights the inadequacies either by way of manpower or infrastructure, that the district administration suffers from, and which hamper a proper and co-ordinated approach to disasters.

Warning systems and dissemination methods

The warning system is available so far as heavy rains and floods are concerned but warning system for likely hood of earth quake is not available. Therefore at least one seismic instrument requested to be installed in a suitable place in the Dist.

Evacuation assistance of individuals, groups, or communities

The assistance depends upon the magnitude of the disaster. The Police and home guards can be deployed for this task for which, training is necessary apart from providing special equipments.

Rescue

The rescue operation were carried, during last floods with the help of Police, Home guard and Local Persons. But at the time of major disaster like earthquake, cyclone there is necessary to have special trained personnel like Military etc. The NGO’s Homewards and local persons needs to be trained for rescue operations, providing them special equipments like earthmover, small boats, mechanical equipment to clear the debris and also common kitchen for serving the food to affected person.

A detailed list of the requirements of the district for rescue operations is given overleaf.

1) Fibre boat : 01

2) Plastic boat : 01

3) Aluminium Assault  boat : 01

4) Out boat Motor : 01

5) Life Jacket / Life rings : 200

6) Overs (Big - Valve) : As per requirement.

7) Padel Chappu (Valve) : As per requirement.

8) Anchor with Rope : 01

9) Boat Hook : 03

10) Boat Repair Patch : As per requirement.

11) Magga : 05

12) Megaphone : 02

13) Rignrip : 50

14) Crow-bar : 02

15) Hatoda, Hammer : 01

16) Rope : 02

( 600 Feet & 3 Inch.)

17) Rope : 02

( 100 Feet & 2 Inch.)

18) Packet line : 50

19) Big- Barrel : 30

20) Wooden Plate : As per requirement

( 10 Feet & 21/2 Inch)

21) Tubes of Jeep/Truck : As per requirement

22) Coconut Rope : As per requirement

23) Tadpatri (Water Proof): 02

24) Tin Box : As per requirement

25) Jerry Can : As per requirement.

26) Wooden Coat : As per requirement.

27) Battery : As per requirement.

28) Single Pulley : 02

29) Double Pulley : 02

30) Tibble Pulley : 02

31) Rope : 02

( 300 Feet & 4 Inch.)

32) Rope : 02

( 200 Feet & 2 Inch.)

33) Gie-Line : 50

( 40 Feet & 1.5 Inch)

34) Streture : 03 ( Each of every Type)

( T,V & VL Type )

Telescopic : 01

35) Blanket : As per requirement.

36) Rain-Coat /Gumboot : As per requirement.

Mitigation Strategies

INSTITUTIONAL ARRANGEMENTS AT THE DISTRICT LEVEL

Disaster management would involve many layers of participating organization. The three focal levels would be State, District and the site of the disaster. The State level agencies would be involved in policy decisions, resource allocation, prioritisation of activities and budget allocation and monitoring through the Emergency Operations Centre.

The District Disaster Management Committee (DDMC) is an apex planning body and will play a major role in preparedness and mitigation.

The district level response will be coordinated under the guidance of District Collector who will act as District Disaster Manager.

Responsibilities of Collector

The Collector shall be responsible for

v preparation of the DDMAP with the assistance of the DDMC.

v setting up District Control Room

v encouraging formation of Mutual Aid and Response Groups (MARG)

v Under the DDMAP, district level agencies would be responsible for directing field interventions through various agencies right from the stage of warning to relief and rehabilitation.

v At the disaster site, specific tasks to manage the disaster will be performed.

v Collector will be an integral part of the DCR.

v Collector will be assisted by SOC.

· SOC will be headed by a Site Manager.

· Site Manager will coordinate the activities at various camp sites and affected areas.

· The Site Operations Centre will report to the District Control Room.

v Collector will coordinate all the field responses. Field Responses include setting up Transit Camps, Relief Camps and Cattle Camps.

The desk arrangements provides for division of tasks, information gathering and record keeping and accountability of the desk officer to the DDM for specific functions. Each desk should have a Desk Officer assigned. The capacity of various desks to coordinate amongst themselves and with the units to be coordinated will ultimately decide the quality of response. Such a function of coordination would largely depend on the capacity to effectively keep a track on communications received and the decisions taken. Pro forma for “In and Out Messages and Register” are given in Annexure I.

Figure I

Coordination structure at district level


Disaster Management Committee

A Disaster Management Committee exists to assist the Collector in

v reviewing the threat of disasters

v vulnerability of the district to such disasters

v evaluating the preparedness and

v considering suggestions for improvement of the response document DDMAP.

The Committee meets once a year under the chairmanship of the Collector and consists of the following functionaries

The Collector                                                                         

Chairman

The District Superintendent of Police

Member

The Chief Executive Officer, Zilla Parishad

Member

The Additional Collector

Member

The Resident District  Collector                                            

Member-Secy

The Commissioner of Police (if any)

Member

The Chief Fire Officer

Member

The District Health Officer

Member

The District Agriculture Officer

Member

The District Animal Husbandry Officer

Member

The Civil Surgeon

Member

The Executive Engineer, P. W. Department

Member

The Executive Engineer, Irrigation Department

Member

The Executive Engineer, Minor Irrigation Division

Member

The Executive Engineer, M.S.E.B.

Member

The Executive Engineer, MWSSB

Member

The Deputy Director of Education

Member

The Divisional Manager, Railways

Member

The Regional Transport Officer

Member

The Regional Manager, M.S.R.T.C.

Member

The District Publicity Officer

Member

The District Supply Officer

Member

The Local Station Director, A.I.R.

Member

The Local Station Director, Doordarshan

Member

The District Commandant, Home Guards

Member

The Divisional Forests Officer

Member

Sub-Divisional Officer(s)

Member

The Local Assistant Engineer, P. and T. Department

Member

The  Defence Units.

Member

District Level NGOs representative

Members

MARG representatives

Members


District Control Room

The District Control Room, under the control of the district collector, will be the nerve centre

v to monitor

v co-ordinate and

v implement the actions for disaster management.

In a disaster situation the District Collector is the central authority exercising emergency powers to issue directives to all departments to provide emergency response service.

Normal Time Activity

The normal time activity of the Disaster Manager is to

v ensure that all warning and communication systems, instruments are in working condition.

v receive information on a routine basis from the district departments on the vulnerability of the various talukas and villages to disasters

v the Disaster Manager will receive reports on preparedness from the relevant district level departments and other departments, as per information details. These will be forwarded to the Emergency Operations Centre, Relief Commissioner and Divisional Commissioner.

v Upgrade and update DDMAP according to changing scenarios in the district

v Update data bank and maintain an inventory of resources as per Table 1.

v Inform Emergency Operations Centre (EOC) and YASHADA of any changes including updating of data bank and annexures

v Monitor preparedness measures, training activities including simulation exercises undertaken by various departments

v Ensure proper dissemination of DDMAP at the district level, local level and disaster prone areas

v Encourage formation of MARG in industrial areas.

v Organise post-disaster evaluation and update DDMAP accordingly

v Prepare reports and documents on district level disaster events and submit the same to EOC. The document should include

Ø source and cause of the disaster,

Ø description of the response effort,

Ø recommendations for preventive and mitigation measures,

Ø plans for upgrading emergency preparedness and response plans.

Table I

Inventory of resources, materials and equipment accessible to DCR

(to be updated by District Control Room every six months and sent to Emergency Operations Centre)

Material/equipment

Departments/Agencies available with

Normal stock/quantity/amount

AC-sheets

 

 

Ambulances

 

 

Asbestos sheets

 

 

Bamboo mats

 

 

Blankets and durries

 

 

Blood

 

 

Boats/Rescue Boats

 

 

Bullies

 

 

Buses

 

 

Cattle-feed (Pre-mix)

 

 

Construction equipments

 

 

Cooked food

 

 

Cooking vessels for use in relief camps

 

 

Cranes

 

 

Drivers

 

 

Drilling rigs

 

 

Earth moving equipments

 

 

Firewood

 

 

Generators

 

 

GI-pipes

 

 

GI-sheets

 

 

Ham sets

 

 

Helicopter service

 

 

Jeeps

 

 

Mobile trauma care vans

 

 

Mobile X-Ray units

 

 

Public address systems

 

 

Pumps – diesel      electric  hand pumps

 

 

Self breathing apparatus

 

 

Sign boards

 

 

Sniffer dogs

 

 

Tagging slips

 

 

Tankers

 

 

Telephone instruments

 

 

Tents

 

 

Taxi gas masks

 

 

Tractor

 

 

Trucks

 

 

VHF sets with batteries

 

 

Wireless sets

 

 


Warning or Occurrence of Disaster

On the basis of reports from the possible disaster site, or on warning from agencies competent to issue such a warning, or on the receipt of warning or alert from Emergency Operations Centre, the Collector will exercise the powers and responsibilities of the District Disaster Manager.

It is assumed that the district administration would be one of the key organisations for issuing warnings and alerts. Additionally, the list of agencies competent for issuing warning or alert is given below:

Disaster
Agencies
Earthquakes IMD, MERI,
Floods Meteorology Department, Irrigation Department
Cyclones IMD
Epidemics Public Health Department
Road Accidents Police
Industrial and Chemical Accidents Industry, MARG, Police,
Fires Fire Brigade, Police

The warning or occurrence of disaster will be communicated to

v Chief Secretary, Relief Commissioner, Emergency Operations Centre,

v Office of Divisional Commissioner

v All district level officials, Municipal Councils, MARG

v The officials of central government located within the district

v Non-officials namely, Guardian Minister of the district, Mayor, ZP President, MPs and MLAs from the district or affected area

v Local units of the Defence Services

On the receipt of warning, all community preparedness measures and counter-disaster measures would come into operation. Further, the occurrence f the disaster would essentially bring into force the following :

v The District Collector will activate the District Control Room as the District Disaster Manager.

v The DCR will be expanded to include desk arrangements with responsibilities for specific tasks.

v All district level staff from various departments will be under the direction and control of the District Disaster Manager. These would also include the district level staff of

Ø Zilla Parishad

Ø Municipal Authorities

Ø MSEB

Ø MWSSB

Ø PWD

Ø MSRTC

Ø Irrigation

Ø District Industries Centre

Ø Telecommunications.

v Leave of all officers and staff working with the above organisations, as requisitioned by the District Disaster Manager, would automatically stand cancelled and the organisations would direct their staff to report on duty immediately.

v The Relief Commissioner is the controlling authority in respect of Grants under “2245-Relief on account of Natural Calamities and also Loans and Advances”. He shall, therefore, ensure that adequate grants are placed at the disposal of the Collector under these budget head and that implementation of relief and rehabilitation measures is not hampered on account of paucity of funds or otherwise.

v The District Disaster Manager may in case of large-scale disasters get in touch with the local Defence units for assistance for rescue, evacuation and emergency relief measures.

v The District Disaster Manager will have the authority to requisition resources, materials and equipments from private sector.

v The District Disaster Manager will have power to direct the industry to activate their on-site or off-site disaster management plan and seek assistance from MARG, if required.

v The District Disaster Manager will set-up Site Operations Centre/s in the affected area with desk arrangements

v The District Disaster Manager will authorise establishment of transit and/or relief camps, feeding centres and cattle camps.

v An on-going wireless communication and contact from the DCR to the Site Operations Centres, Transit Camps, Feeding Centres, Relief Camps and Cattle Camps will be activated.

v The District Disaster Manager will send the Preliminary Information Report and Action Taken Report, as per the available information, to the Chief Secretary/Relief Commissioner/Emergency Operations Centre and the Divisional Commissioner.

v The District Disaster Manager will authorise immediate evacuation whenever necessary

v In the event of possibilities of disasters in adjoining districts, including those beyond the state borders, the District Disaster Manager will issue the alert warning to them.

v In multi-district disasters, if Additional Relief Commissioner is appointed at the multi-district level, the District Disaster Manager will report to the Additional Relief Commissioner.

In the absence of Collector, Additional Collector or Assistant Collector or Resident Deputy Collector will officiate and exercise all the powers and responsibilities of the District Disaster Manager listed above.

Desk Arrangements in District Control Room

District Disaster Manager

v Establishing Priorities

v Direct and coordinate the services of

Ø Defence Services, SRP, CRPF, Home Guards, Coast Guards, CISF

Ø Fire Brigade, Civil Defence

Ø DOT, Railways, AAI, Port Trust, FCI,

Ø DD, AIR

Ø MSEB, MWSSB, MSRTC, PWD

Ø Meteorological Department, MERI, MPCB,

Ø State Government Aircrafts and Helicopters

v Coordinate with NGOs, and aid agencies

v Enlist services of GOI/GOM laboratories and expert institutions for specialised services

Desk Assignments

Functions

Operations Desk

 

  A.Response Action for

v      Rescue and evacuation


v     
Emergency transport for the seriously injured at the earliest possible time


v     
Emergency supplies of water and cooked food


v     
Salvage Operations


v     
Disposal of dead

v      Transfer of marooned persons to transit camps at the earliest possible time


v     
Within shortest possible time  for  marooned persons, water, medicines, first-aid, cooked food

v      Transit camps (in accordance with standards laid down) to be set-up at the earliest


v     
Food Distribution Centres (in accordance to the Checklist) to be set-up at the earliest

B. Implement  procurement/ purchase/ hire/ requisition plans    of materials  available at the district level. 

C. Establishing communication links

v   EOC


v   Office of Divisional Commissioner


v  
Police, Railways, Fire Brigade, Defence Services, Civil Defence,  FCI, CISF, CPWD, PWD, MSEB, Irrigation, MWSSB, RTO, MPCB, IMD, and Inter-departmental relief activities within the district.
v  Mutual Aid and Response Group


v
  NGOs and NGO coordinating committee

v      Private donors

 

D.Reporting


v      Dispatch of Preliminary Information Report and Action Taken Report to Emergency Operations Centre and  Divisional Commissioner.

v      Dispatch of all  information and any other as asked for by  Emergency Operations Centre and  Divisional Commissioner.

v      Report to Emergency Operations Centre and  Divisional Commissioner on deployment and reinforcements of staff and resources.

v      Identify specific items for follow-up actions on the directives of the District Disaster Manager

E. Supervision and Monitoring of disaster management and relief activities within the district

F. Market Intervention

v    Promote and encourage revitalisation of local economic activities for speedy recovery


v     
Prevent hoarding, price hiking and corruption and unauthorised sale of relief materials


v     
Initiate  legal action on those engaged in  hoarding, price hiking, corruption and unauthorised sale of relief materials



G. General

v      Disseminate details about legal and official procedures, eligibility criteria with respect to relief and compensation for loss of life, injuries, livestock, crop, houses,  required to be adopted, as received from EOC


v     
Maintenance of records (date of joining, period of service, leave record, overtime, etc) for all the persons deployed for relief work within the district


v     
Obtaining orders, instructions, clearances, clarifications from state and divisional headquarters

v      Ensure implementation of orders, instructions,  from EOC and divisional headquarters at the disaster site.


v     
Requisition of accommodation, structure, vehicles and equipments for relief duty


v     
Issue of passes and identification stickers for vehicles on relief duty


v     
Issue of passes and identity cards to relief personnel including the persons from NGOs


v     
Sanctioning expenses for reimbursement with the approval of the District Disaster Manager (DDM).

Services Desk

A. A. Assess

v      Search and rescue requirements as per information

v      Relief requirements as per information



B. Organise and coordinate
v      Relief camps (in accordance with standards laid down) to be set-up


v     
Arrangements for dry rations and family kits for cooking

v      Cattle camps


v     
Relief supplies to Transit and Relief camps or to  Site Operations Centre.


v     
Supplies  of fodder and cattle-feed to cattle camps


v     
Supply of seeds, agriculture inputs and services to Site Operations Centre.


v     
Welfare Services


v     
law and  order  (e.g., prevent looting and theft)

C. Coordinate NGO activities through necessary support to ensure community participation

v      Establishing coordination mechanisms among district level NGOs and other state level NGOs such as Indian Red Cross, Ramkrishna Mission, Bharat Sevashram,  Swami Narayan Trust, Bharatiya Jain Sanghatna,  OXFAM, CARE, CASA, CARITAS


v     
identification of NGOs to serve on committees,  task force

v      assign  well-defined  area of operations and report to EOC

v      assigning specific response functions to specialised NGOs and report to EOC

v      reporting upon procurement and disbursement of relief materials received through government and non-government channels


v     
Mobilise and coordinate work of volunteers ensuring  community participation


Infrastructure  Desk

(Officer In-charge from PWD/Irrigation/MSEB)

A. Organise and coordinate clearance of  debris

B. Temporary Repairs to  damaged infrastructure

v      power

v      water

v      transport

v      telecommunication

v      roads

v      bridges

v      canals

v      public buildings

C. Construction of Facilities

v      shelters with sanitation and recreation facilities

v      provision of hand-pumps and borewells

v      temporary structures for storage

v      educational facilities

v      medical facilities

v      postal facility

v      helipads

Health Desk

(Officer In-charge from Health Department)

A. Organise  and maintain records on

v      treatment of the injured and sick

v      preventive medicine and anti-epidemic actions

v      disposal of dead bodies

v      disposal of carcasses

v      Reports  on  food, water supplies, sanitation and disposal   of waste

B. Assess, supply and supervise

v      Medical relief for the injured

v      Number of ambulances required and hospitals where they could be sent, (public and private);

v      Medical equipment and medicines required

v      special information required regarding treatment as for epidemics etc.

C. Supervision of maintenance of standards

v      Identification of source for supply of drinking water through tankers and other means of transport

v      transit and relief camps for cooking arrangements, sanitation, water supply, disposal of waste, water stagnation and health services.

v      Communities for storage of rations, sanitation, water supply, disposal of waste, water stagnation and health services.

v      standards in cattle camps with arrangements for water, fodder, disposal of solid waste, veterinary services

Logistics Desk

(Officer In-charge from Revenue Department)

A. General

v      Assessment of  reinforcement needs including manpower and deployment of resources  as per information (formats given)

v      Requirement, availability and location of depots, and transportation of wood to the locations for mass cremation

v      Identification of location where mass cremation/burial can be carried out and Manpower and transport that would be required for this work;

v      Identification of location where carcasses can be disposed of  and Manpower and transport that would be required for this work;

v      Requesting for additional resources from other districts/divisional headquarters/EOC.

v      Arrangements with petrol pumps for supply of fuel for authorised relief vehicles against credit coupons

v      Coordinating and supervising issuing of  Village relief tickets to affected families

v      Ensuring safe storage, and transport of relief Supplies

v      Coordinate supplies distributed directly by NGOs and other organisations including private donors

v      Ensure proper maintenance of vehicles and equipment

B. Coordination of  Transport with

v      railways

v      MSRTC

v      Private transporters

v      Boat Operators

v      State Government Aircrafts

v      State Government Helicopters

C. Organising Transport for

v      Rescue parties

v      Relief Personnel

v      Marooned persons

v      Water, medicines, first aid and  cooked food for marooned persons

v      Volunteers

v      Relief Materials

v      Seriously injured and Sick

 

Agriculture Desk

(Officer In-charge from Agriculture Department)

Organise and coordinate

v      Rehabilitation of  agricultural production

v      Ensuring  interim crop production through supply of seeds and other inputs

v      Services of extension staff

Communication and Information Management Desk (Communication Room)

(District Information Officer as Officer In-charge)

 

A. Set-up  an information centre in DCR to organise sharing of information with mass media and  community

B. Monitor disaster warnings and weather conditions in coordination with and on the advise of

v      IMD,  Irrigation, MERI, Industries

C. General

v      Send Out-Messages on behalf of DDM

v      Maintaining  In-Message, Out-Message Register

v      Collect information from Site Operations Centre

v      Organise  information for  EOC and information on demand from Divisional Commissioner/EOC.

v      Serve as data bank required for managing operational aspects of disaster situations

D. Keep  readily available all the information contained in DDMAP, including

v      Office and residence telephone numbers, fax numbers, and mobile numbers where applicable of Chief Secretary and other Secretaries including Divisional Commissioner

v      Phone numbers, names, addresses and pager numbers where applicable of the officers and staff of the district and Emergency Operations Centre

v      List of people  on the spot who can organise and co-ordinate the relief activities,

v      Phone numbers, fax numbers, wireless, etc. of the other control rooms;

v      Phone numbers, names, and addresses of the field officers

v      Phone numbers, names, and addresses Non-officials (like MPs, MLAS, and Corporators) in the District

v      Planning Information required including maps incorporated in DDMAP 

v      Disaster Site Map and indications on  extent to which other areas may be affected, etc. 

v      Information regarding alternate routes, water sources, layout of essential services which may be affected, etc.

Resources  Desk

(Officer In-charge from Revenue Department)

A. Maintenance of

v      Books of account for all cash receipts according to source of funding

v      Books of accounts for all cash disbursements according to source of funding

v      Stock register for all relief materials

v      Issue register for all relief materials

v      Dead stock register for all non-consumables (inventory)

v      Record of all personnel payment on TA&DA, daily wages and other incidentals made to relief personnel.

v      Records of all  expenses incurred on administration and disaster management.

v      Records of all transfer of funds (as advances) to other government departments (suspense account)

v      Records  of all cash vouchers and credit vouchers

v      Records of all gratuitous relief

v      Records of all compensation paid

v      Preparation of records relating to finance and accounts as per the formats for dispatch to Emergency Operations Centre

B. Issuing of receipts for

v      All cash receipts

v      All materials receipt

C. General

v      All payments of  approved expenses, dues, claims, daily wages

v      Reimbursement of expenses approved by administration

v      Issue of cash vouchers and credit vouchers for petrol and diesel


Role of Divisional Commissioner

On the occurrence of disaster, the Divisional Commissioner will

v Provide for reinforcement of resources from other districts within the division

v Keep in constant touch with Chief Secretary, Relief Commissioner, Emergency Operations Centre

Site Operations Centre and Relief Camps

Planning Assumptions

v A small scale disaster can be managed through Collector’s office without comprehensive desk arrangements at the DCR.

v A Disaster affecting

· a number of villages

· doing considerable damage to housing

· spread geographically over a large area and different locations

Þ creates problems of management and logistics

Þ Decentralisation of relief activities will improve the efficiency of DCR. This will require organisation of desk arrangements at the camp sites.

Þ Site Operations Centre and location of Relief Camps will ensure effective decentralisations and organisation of relief activities.

Site Operations Centre

Depending on the nature of disaster and the type of damage, it may be necessary to set-up a number of relief camps and/or cattle camps.

· In such a situation, the DDM may decide to set-up a Site Operations Centre to reduce the pressure on DCR for field coordination.

· Depending on the disaster locations and the number of camp sites, the DDM may decide to set-up more than one Site Operations Centre.

· The Site Operation Centre and the camps would be wound up after the relief and rehabilitation work is called off or after the relief camps and cattle camps are dismantled whichever is later.

· The activities for the Site Operations Centre are given in Table III.

· The Site Operations Centre will be managed by Site Manager of the rank of Sub-Divisional Officer/Deputy Collector.

It may be noted that a coordinating structure of this type may have many areas of overlap with the DCR and therefore the activities need not be duplicated. The basic functions of the Site Operations Centre will be to facilitate communication and coordination between DCR and the camp sites. A skeleton structure as given in Table II should be able to perform these tasks.

Relief Camps

Relief Camps would be set-up preferably on settlement lines and unless the disaster is a localised phenomenon, the DDM may decide to set-up as many camps as the number of villages affected. Also the size of the camp will be one of the considerations particularly in urban areas to decide on the number. The administrative structure for such relief camps responsible for direct service to “victims” is given in Table III. Each relief camp will be assigned to a Camp Officer, of the rank of Tahsildar. In some of the disasters, it may be necessary to set-up Feeding centres only for the victims.

The DDM may agree to assign some such relief camps or feeding centres to willing non-governmental organisations (NGOs) with demonstrated capability and required manpower. However, such camps would also come under coordinating mechanisms established through Site Operations Centre/s or DCR.

Table II

Site Operations Centre

(at a convenient location from the disaster site for coordinating site operations)

Activities

A.  Response Action for

v      Rescue and evacuation

v      Salvage Operations

v      Disposal of dead

v      Transit camps (in accordance with standards laid down)

v      Feeding Centres (in accordance to the Checklist) for  two weeks to be set-up at the earliest

v      Emergency supplies of water and cooked food

B. Communication  with

v      Emergency Operations Centre

v      District control room

v      District administration staff in the area

v      Camp Officer for transit camps, relief camps and cattle camps.

v      NGOs and NGO coordinating committee

C. Communicate to DCR

v      Search and rescue requirements

v      Resource requirements

v      Cash Compensation

v      Receive, store, secure, transport, relief materials for transit, relief and cattle camps, and affected villages.

v      All information  and subsequent demands to district control room

D. Organise

v      Preventive medicine and anti-epidemic actions

v      Inspection of  food, water supplies, sanitation and disposal of waste


Table III

Relief Camps (Components)

(at a convenient location from the disaster site for relief )

Desk Assignments

Functions

Operations  Desk A.  Undertake Response Action for

v      Salvage Operations

v      Feeding Centres  for  two weeks to be set-up at the earliest

B. Coordination with

v      Site Operations Centre

v      District Control Room

v      District administration staff in the area

v      NGOs

v      Private donors

C. Manage

v      Dispatch of all information (as per the formats) and subsequent demands to DCR/Site Operations Centre

v      Organise shifts for staff and Supervision of the same

D. General

v      Maintenance of  records (date of joining, period of service, leave record, overtime, etc) for all the persons deployed for relief work at operations centre

v      Get sanction for expenses for reimbursement from the DDM through Site Operations Centre.

Services Desk

A. A. Assess

4.1.1      

v      Resource requirements

B. B. Organise

v      Arrangements for dry rations and family kits for cooking within two weeks of the disaster

v      Relief supplies to families or to  households including water, clothing, and food

C. C. Provide Welfare services  

v      Restoration of family (including locating  missing children, relatives, friends) 

v      Assistance in locating missing cattle

v      Assisting students to continue with their studies

v      Services for the orphans

v      Assisting individuals with special needs (pregnant women, infants, handicapped, old, widows etc)

v      Counselling services

v      Promotive services for mental health

Infrastructure  Desk A. Clear debris

B. Mobilise community participation and coordinate building of 

v      shelters for affected people with  sanitation facilities

v      temporary structures for storage

v      Kitchens

v      medical facilities

v      education facility

v      recreational facility

v      postal facility

v      temporary Repairs to  damaged infrastructure

 

 

4.1.2      

Health Desk

A. Organise

v      disposal of dead bodies

v      disposal of carcasses

v      disposal of waste and waste water

v      Treatment of the injured and sick

v      Preventive medicine and anti-epidemic actions

v      Inspection of  food, water supplies, sanitation and disposal of waste

4.1.3      

Logistics Desk

v      Issue Village relief tickets to affected families

v      Organise distribution of Relief Supplies

v      Receive, store, secure,  relief materials for relief camps, and affected villages.

v      Coordinate supplies distributed directly by NGOs and other organisations including private donors

v      Ensure proper maintenance of vehicles and equipment

v      Ensure optimum utilisation of resources such as fuel, food, and other relief materials

v      Mobilise and coordinate work of volunteers ensuring  community participation

v      Organise facilities for staff and volunteers

 

 

Communication and Information Management Desk

Collect and dispatch following information to Site Operations Centre

v      Data collection

v      Record keeping

v      Assistance in locating missing persons

v      Information Centre

v      Organisation  of information for Site Operations Centre  and on specific demands.

v      Maintaining In-Message and Out-Message Register

v      Sending all Out-Messages on behalf of Camp Officer of Relief Camp.

Resources Desk

A. Maintenance of

v      Books of account for all cash receipts 

v      Books of accounts for all cash disbursements

v      Stock register for all relief materials

v      Issue register for all relief materials

v      Dead stock register for all non-consumables (inventory)

v      Record of all personnel payment for daily wages and other incidentals made to relief personnel.

v      Records of all  expenses incurred on administration and disaster management at relief camp.

v      Records of all gratuitous relief

v      Records of all compensation paid

v      Preparation of records relating to finance and accounts as per the formats for dispatch to Site Operations Centre

B. B. General

v      All cash donations must be deposited with District Control Room and a receipt for the same obtained

v      All material donations must be entered in stock register  and made available for inspection to officer from the District Control Room or Site Operations Centre

v      Maintain record of all issue of cash vouchers and credit vouchers for petrol and diesel

4.1.4   


Facilities/Amenities Provided in the DCR

Planning Assumption

v The Collector’s office has an adjoining Meeting Room, which can accommodate approximately 30-40 people. Hence, this will be used as a Conference Room.

v The Communication Room is located next to the Collector’s office

Layout

The DCR has

v adequate space for a large workstation

v various desk arrangements during disaster situations.

The DCR is equipped with

v necessary furniture and storewells for keeping

Ø files of messages

Ø stationery

Ø other office equipment.

v Action Plans including sub-plans and local plans

v Vulnerability Maps

v List of key contact persons

[Are easily accessible with clear labels, and not kept under lock and key].

Important phone numbers which are frequently required are displayed on the wall so that they can be seen easily, while other phone numbers, names and addresses etc., are also maintained on the computer to facilitate easy retrieval and cross-referencing..

Provision is made for

v first-aid and other basic medical relief for the staff

v a rest room with adequate facilities and

v a lunch room

[This is required especially during disaster when staff may have to be on duty for long hours at a stretch].

Communication Room (Main Message Room)

[The existing police wireless system continues to be in contact with the reorganised DCR].

In addition, the following facilities are available in the communication room

v Telephones

v Fax

v Intercom units for contact within the Collectorate

v VSAT connection to the Divisional Commissioner and EOC in Mantralaya

v Civil Wireless Network upto Tahsildar level

v One PC with modem and printer

v Mechanical typewriter

v Mobiles and Pagers (where available and necessary)

v Photocopying machine

During disaster, hotlines from communication room to be connected to

Ø Divisional Commissioner

Ø EOC at Mantralaya

Ø Superintendent of Police of the district

Ø Civil Surgeon of the district

Ø Site Operations Centre

Separate tables are provided for each communication instruments such as

v VSAT

v telephones

v fax

v computer

v printer

v typewriter

v wireless

The phones, i.e. intercom, STD phone, EPBX extension, hotline etc., are of different colours, and with distinct rings if possible, to enable them to be distinguished from each other. An emergency light, fire extinguishers, and a generator for the computer and fax machine are also provided in the communication room.

Desk Requirements

Each of the desks have

an independent phone with STD facility

v intercom units for contact within the Collectorate for all Desk Officers in DCR and Officers-in-charge from line departments and other agencies at the district level

hotline for all Officers-in-charge to be connected to their respective agencies/departments.

Office space for secretarial facility has to be clearly demarcated.

[These telephones with STD facilities will be installed in DCR and kept in working condition under lock and key during normal circumstances].

Transport

Provision is made for a jeep with wireless communication assigned to DCR during normal times. Additional vehicles will be requisitioned as per the requirements during the emergency.

Staffing requirements for DCR

Three categories of staff are suggested for the DCR: Regular Staff for Communication Room, Staff -on-call and Staff on Disaster Duty.

Regular Staff

The regular staff will be posted permanently in the DCR which will be responsible for manning the Communication Room on a 24-hour basis.

The regular staff would include the following:

v Desk Officer - Communication Room

A Deputy Collector from the Collectorate will function as the Desk Officer - Communication Room. He will be in charge of the day-to-day operation of the Communication Room during official working hours. He will be assisted by officers of the rank of Naib Tahsildars and Awal Karkuns from the Collectorate in rotation during non-working hours.

v Communication Room Assistant

The person holding this position will be the key person of the DCR and will be of the rank of an Awal Karkun. He will always be physically present in the Communication Room. He will be responsible for processing all messages and information received and maintained by the Communication Room and communicating the same to the Desk Officer and Collector.

v Stenographer

The person holding this position will provide all secretarial assistance to the Communication Room. The person should be computer literate and should be able to operate database systems.

v Communication operators (for 24 hours)

The communication operator will attend to wireless set as well as the VSAT connection in the Communication Room.

v Driver cum Messenger/Attendant (for 24 hours)

Drivers will be required for the vehicle attached to the DCR and kept on stand-by duty. These drivers should also be trained to operate the wireless fitted in the vehicle attached to the DCR.

Staff-on-call

Staff-on-call will be available for immediate duty in case of a disaster.

Two Deputy Collectors will make up the Staff -on-call. During a disaster, these officers will always be available "on call".

The staff-on-call will be appointed in rotation from some identified departments. The rotation period could be of at least a month, to ensure some degree of continuity.

Staff on Disaster Duty

Staff on Disaster Duty will be required to shoulder additional responsibility in the case of a disaster. This, additional staff will be in the nature of a reserve and may be drawn from various departments. During normalcy, this staff will not be called on to perform any duty in the DCR. This staff will be responsible for managing the desk arrangements mentioned earlier.

The departmental officers nominated as “Officer-in-Charge” from the concerned line departments and other agencies will be available in the DCR during the disaster period.

Departments have appointed the senior-most District Officer of the department as “Officer-in-Charge”.

The Collector, Additional Collector, Assistant Collector, Resident Deputy Collector, all Deputy Collectors, SDOs and Tahsildars are familiar with the functioning of DCR.

Officers-in-Charge drawn from various line departments and agencies will be provided orientation through training programmes to be organised by YASHADA.

Multi-district Disasters

In case of disasters which have an impact on more than one district in a division the role of the Divisional Commissioner comes into prominence . The Commissioner’s responsibilities shall include exercising general supervision over the work of preparation of contingency plan undertaken by the Collectors in his Division and also on the relief and rehabilitation operations in those districts.

At the Divisional Commissioner’s level all the state departments and agencies have a regional head. It is very practical for the Divisional Commissioner to seek the support of these regional heads towards the commitment of regional resources to a disaster situation.

For a disaster in more than one district (within or across the division), the role of Divisional Commissioner is to:

v provide a unified command through inter-district control room

v ensure need-based resource allocations amongst districts

v seek the support of regional heads of line departments for relief

v Direct and Coordinate in response to requirements from district control room the services of

Ø MSRTC

Ø State Government departments

Ø SRP, CRPF, Home Guards, Coast Guards, CPWD, CISF

Ø Fire Brigade, Civil Defence

Ø Telecommunications

v maintain a close liaison with the EOC

v seek policy guidelines, if necessary

v Mobilise services of Central/State government laboratories and recognised research centres for specialised services

In such a situation, the Divisional Commissioner will act

v as the Additional Relief Commissioner for the disaster area,

v his powers will be analogous to that of Relief Commissioner in the EOC.

Ø will access funds from the State Government for this purpose

Ø will be assisted by Deputy Commissioner, Revenue in discharge of disaster

management functions as is the normal practice.

Ø will receive the support of other Deputy Commissioners and Assistant Commissioners

and Line Department Heads.

[The district control rooms would continue to function in their respective districts and perform all the functions as per the DDMAP].


RESPONSE STRUCTURE

Planning Assumptions

The multi-disaster response plan takes a generic approach to disaster situations to identify information requirements along with communication, coordination, monitoring and institutional arrangements.

The overall response structure remains constant irrespective of the type of disaster.

The flow chart indicate the chain of command that should be set in motion in order to manage the disaster.

Response Plan on occurrence of disaster

Key Officials of various Departments

Deptt.
Head of Deptt. or Next incharge
Phone Nos.
Office
Residence
Revenue Resident Dy. Collector 23702 23701
Police Dy. Sptd. of Police (Home) 23157 23054
Health Dist. Health Officer 20526 20165
Finance Dist. Treasury Officer 23553 ---------
Z.P. Chief Executive Officer 23900 22777
M.C. Chief Officer M.C. Parbhani 23809 23638
P.W.D. Executive Engineer PWD 22708 23708
Irregation Ex. Engineer M.I. State 22210 23082
Forest Dy. Conservator of Forest, Parbhani 20455 20116
R.T.O. Asstt. Regional Transport Officer 48148 -----
Industries Dist. Industries Officer ------- -------
District
Information
Dist. Information Officer 20047 23147
M.S.E.B. Ex. Eng. M.S.E.B.(O&M) 22681 22007
Telephones District Managers Telephones 22200 23800
Lead Officer
NGO's
Social Welfare Officer 20873 20595

Involvement and Assistance available to Departments from Private Sector/Academic Institutions

Police Department

The following colleges have NCC and NSS volunteers who can help the police.

Sr. No.
Name .of College
or School
No. of NCC
Volunteeres
No. of NSS
Volunteeres
Phone No.
1. Shivaji Mahavidayalaya
Parbhani
(Comanding Officer
Shri B.G. Korad)
108 ----- 23085 (o)
21649 (o)
49046 (R)
2. Marathwada Krishi Vidayapith
Parbhani
(Shri Dahiphale)
108 ----- 23001 to 10
(PBX)
3. N.V.S. Marathwada
High School, Parbhani
(Shri Ashturkar)
100 ---- 20102
4. Z.P. High School, Pathri
(Shri Sarwade)
100 ---- 55423 (o)
54470(R)
5. Z.P. Highschool , Parbhani
(Shri Kurundkar)
100 ----- 20630

Following is a list of timber merchants who can provide firewood for disposal of dead bodies.

List of Fire-wood stockists and Saw Mills

Sr. no. Name of Owner and Location
1. Shri Sk. Yusuf Sk. Gosoddin
Ashok Nager, Phoole Colony, Parbhani
2. Shri Nabeer Khan Alliear Khan,
Goal Ghumat , Kadrabad Plot, Parbhani.
3. Shri Abdul Hamid Jillani Chouse
Near Naz Takaize, Parbhani.
4. Shri Md. Javed Md. Usman
Near Naz Takaize, Parbhani.
5. Shri Kalander Khan Meer Alam Khan
Dhar Road, Parbhani.
6. Shri Mirja Mustafa Beg Alibeg,
Kadbi Mandi , Parbhani.
7. Shri Sk. Salim Sk. Ali.
Kadbi Mandi, Parbhani.
8. Shri Gangaram Dhondiram Panchal
Basmath Road, Parbhnai.
9. Shri Sk. Sultan Sk. Jamal,
Bheem Nager, Parbhani.
10. Shri Jalil Sk. Najoddin,
Sarpaj Nager, Parbhani.
11. Shri Sk. Shabeer Sk. Gaffur
Kadrabad Plot , Parbhani.
12. Sow. Seetabai Tukaram Ingle
Railway Station road, Hingoli
13. Sk. Rajjak Sk. Aman
Pension Pura, Hingoli
14. Shri Ibrahim Khan Yayatkhn,
Pension pura, Hingoli.
15. Shri. Sk. Salim Sk. Gulam
Akola Jeen Naka, Sidarth Nager, Hingoli
16. Shri Sk. Sayyed Bhola Sd. Pasha
Mustanasha Nager, Hingoli
17. Shri Sk. Khailil Sk. Ahamad
Talab Kata Magalwara, Hingoli
18. Shri Salim Khan Rahim Khan
Post. Narsi Namdeo

List of Timber Merchants :-

Sr. No.
Name of Owner
Name & Location
1. Parbhani Tq.
1. Shri Datta Setaram
Dombe
Sainath Saw Mill
New Mondha, Parbhani.
2. Shri Nathmal Madanlal
Lohiya
Sudarshan Saw Mill
New Mondha, Parbhani
3. Smt. Chandrabhagabai
Ratanlal Lohiya
Gahawane Road,
Parbhani.
4. Shri Mehboob Khan
Dulhemiya Pathan
Taj Saw Mill
Gangakhed Road, Parbhani
5. Shri Md. Ekbal
Md. Usman
New India Saw Mill
Dhar Road, Parbhani.
6. Shri Samandar Khan
Mahemood Khan
Samandar Saw Mill
New Mondha, Parbhani.
7. Shir Abdul Rahim
Abdul Shakoor
New Hindh Saw Mill
Wangi Road, Parbhani
8. Shri Abdul Karim
Sk. Ibrahim
Khaza Saw Mill
Wangi Road, Parbhani.
9. Shri Seetaramji Tanaji
Shinde
Shinde Farniture Mart
Wangi Road, Parbhani
10. Shri Vishram Teja Patel Geeta Timber Mart
Jintoor Road, Parbhani.
11. Shri Devidas Rambhaou
Rode
New Sainath Sawmill
New Mondha, Parbhani.
12. Shri Motilal Katharulal
Lohiya
Moti Saw Mill
New Mondha Parbhani.
13. Shri Harish Kesharbai
Patel
Shankar Timber Mart
Jintoor Road, Parbhani.
14. Shri Ramchandra
Madanlal Bagird
Shriram Saw Mill
Jintur Road, Parbhani.
15. Shri Hanshraj Arjun
Patel
Shankar Vijay Saw Mill
Jintur Road, Parbhani.
16. Shri Bansilal Ramnath
Mahoti
Nirmal Saw Mill
M.I.D.C. Parbhani.
17. Shri Deojibhai ShivajiBhai
Patel
Ganesh Saw Mill
Jintur Road, Parbhani.
18. Shri Lalchand Devkaranji
Jangeed
Laxmi Farniture Mart
M.I.D.C. Parbhani
19. Shri Mukadaar Khan
Meeralam Khan Pathan
Mukadaar Saw Mill
New Mondha, Parbhani.
20. Shri Md. Ismil Md. Usman Madeena Saw Mill
Behind Z.P. Office, Parbhani.
21. Shri Mariba Kishanrao
Tongerao
Laxmi Saw Mill
Pokharni Narsinmha
22. Shri Shivaji Shyamrao
Lad
Pandurang Sawmill
Pedgaon
23. Shri Sattar Beg
Magbool Beg
Sattar Saw Mill Umri
24. Shri Prakash Kishanrao
Deshmukh
Kiran Saw Mill.
2. Purna Tq.
1 Shri Ghanshyam Panchal Mohan Saw Mill, Purna
2 Shri Narayan Baliram
Panchal
Balaji Saw Mill,
Purna
3 Shri Bapurao Narayanrao
Dhoolshete
Dhoolshete Saw Mill
Phoolkalas
3. Basmat Nager Tq.
1 Shri Premji Makhji Patel Jalaram Timber Depot.
Basmatnager.
2 Shri Sadashiv Baburao
Panchal
Balaji Saw Mill, Kurunda
3 Shri Madhav Narayan
Hattekar
Balaji Saw Mill, Girgaon
4 Shriram Vamanrao
Panchal
Shriram Saw Mill
Kurunda
5 Shri Ramkishan
Kachrulal Kabra
Kabra Saw Mill Basmat Nager
6 Shri Parshuram Pudaji
Garad
Janta Saw Mill
Basmat Nager,
7 Shri Aliomoyin Sk.
Farid Saheb
Saw Mill, Post. Girgaon
8 Shri Vishvanath
Kishanrao Barahate
Hatteshwar Saw Mill
Hatta.
9 Shri Jugal Kishor
Ladda
Ladda Saw Mill
Basmat Nager, Parbhani
10 Shri Shivaji Maghji
Patel
Mahadeo Sawmill
Basmath Nager
4. Gangakhed Tq.
1 Machindra Darbabar
Singh Shahu
Laxmi Saw Mill, Sonpeth
2 Sanjay Moolchand
Kabra
Kabra Saw Mill, Gangakhed
3 Sd. Mazhar Sd. Ismil Hasmi Saw Mill, Gangakhed
4 Sudhakar Marotrao
Karahle
Maratha Saw Mill Gangakhed
5 Bharatsingh Bajrangsingh
Rajpoot
Rajpoot Saw Mill, Gangakhed
6 Manik Laxmanrao Maske Maske Saw Mill, Gangakhed
7 Baburao Banderao Shete Umesh Saw Mill, Gangakhed
8 Sd. Akbar Sd. Jafar Akbar Saw Mill, Ranisawargaon
9 Sk. Rashid Sk. Rahim Maheboob Saw Mill, Gangakhed
10 BhimjiBhai WaljiBahi
Patel
Ganesh Saw Mill, Gangakhed
11 Maheboob be Sk. Ismil Nawaj Saw Mill, Gangakhed
5. Palam Tq.
1 Sd. Abdul Sattar Latif Saw Mill, Palam
2 Abdul Gaffoor Sk.
Kureshe
Abdul Naim Saw Mill, Palam
3 Md. Basheer Sk.
Ahemad
Aabeeb Saw Mill, Palam
6. Jintur Tq.
1 Jodaram Gaurdharilal
Jogound
Prashant Saw Mill, Jintur
2 Choonilal Laduram
Jogound
Jogand Saw Mill, Bori
3 Amauall Khan Meer
Amam Khan
Maharashtra Saw Mill
Bori.
4 Sk. Basigwila Sk. Amir Maharashtra Saw Mill,
Jintur.
5 Sk. Moojud Sk. Ladle
Saheb
Mojood Saw Mill,
Jintur.
6 Vishwanath Abaji More Datta Saw Mill.
7 Aliomoddin Altafomoddin
Kazi
Saw Mill Owner
Post. Charthana
8 Haji Rajjak Haji Moosa Kisan Saw Mill, Kausadi
9 Punjaji Baburao Darade Laxmi Saw Mill Chincholi,
Darade
10 Mirja Nazeer Beg
Karim Beg.
Dasharath Saw Mill,
Jintur.
11 Shankarlal Venkatlal
Ladda
BhagyaLaxmi Saw Mill Bori
12 Mirza Khalilbeg Karim
beg
Sagar Saw Mill, Jintur
7. Sailu Tq.
1 Shri Mangibai Shyamji
Bhai Patel
Saraswati Saw Mill,
Sailu
2 Jaychand Gulabchand
Pawar
Lokseva Saw Mill,
Sailu.
3 Ganpat Mahadeo
Panchal
Panchal Saw Mill
Sailu.
4 DeojiBhai Kartan Bhai
Patel
Patel Saw Mill,
Sailu
5 Gamgaram Babulal
Kamal
Rajesh Saw Mill
Walur
8. Pathri Tq.
1 Sd. Sakid Sd. Imam Sayed Saw Mill, Manwat
2 Himtaram Laxminarayan
Jangeed
Jangeed Saw Mill,
Manwat.
3 Md. Ismial Sk. Jamal Manwat Tq. Pathri
4 Abadwin Haji Rajjaq Ajij Saw Mill, Pathri
5 Abdul Haji Rajjaq Haji
Sk. Ahemad
Abdul Rajjaq & Brothers,
Pathri.
6 Abdul Kalim Abdul Alim Kalim Ansari Saw Mill
Pathri.
9. Hingoli Tq.
1 Madhavrao Sonaji
Kavrand
Shriram Saw Mill, Goregaon
2 Pruthwiraj Singh
Ratansingh Chavan
Chavan Brothers Saw Mill
Hingoli
3 Prabhakar Narayan
Pille
New Laxmi Saw Mill,
Hingoli.
4 Laxman Venkati
Mabolkar
Bhagwati Saw Mill,
Hingoli
5 Parsaram Narayan
Verulkar
Santosh Saw Mill
Hingoli.
6 Mesaji Bhikhaji Khandare Laxmi Saw Mill Jawla (Kh)
7 Sanjay Raghunath Ingle Prakash Saw Mill
Kanergaon Naka
8 Khetabhai Pooja Bhai
Patel
Shivshankar Saw Mill
Hingoli
9 Sk. Younus Sk. Hamid National Saw Mill, Hingoli
10 Motiram Babuji Bodenkar Vishvakarma Saw Mill,
Hingoli.
11 Madhukar Raghunath
Ingle
Shivshankar Saw Mill
Narsi Namdeo,
12 Sopanrao Vithalrao
Karale
Laxmi Saw Mill Digras
Karale
13 Sd. Gulab Sd. Moonwar Shahaka Saw Mill
M.I.D.C. Hingoli.
14 Sow. Shakuntala
Subhashrao Ingle
Balaji Saw Mill, Hingoli
10. Aundha Tq.
1 Laxman Gorpaya Vibhute Mahadeo Sawmill,
Jawlabazar,
2 Sayed Farooq Syed Sayed
Mahemood
Saw Mill
Jawalabazar
3 Sk. Farid Sk. Isar Shyam Saw Mill
jawalabazar.
11. Sengaon Tq.
1 Ronoji Nathuji Khtolkar Vishvakarma Saw Mill
Shengaon.
2 Bholaram Baluram
Jagiend
Amar Saw Mill, Goregaon
3 Haribhau Panduji
Karwade
Laxmi Saw Mill, Goregaon
4 Keshav Bhagaji Raitkar Vishwakarma Saw Mill,
Pankanehargaon
5 Kishoor Pralhadrao
Wagh
Prakash Saw Mill
Aajegaon
12. Kalamnuri Tq.
1 Bharatand Raonoji
Hatagale
Hatagale Saw Mill
Dongarkada
2 Kayaum Khan
Dolekhan Pathan
Hajijiya Saw Mill
Kalamnuri
3 Rameshwar Raju
Sharma
R.R. Saw Mill
Akhada Balapoor
4 Smt. Nalinibai Digambar
Deshmukh
Deshmukh Saw Mill
Akhada Balapoor
5 Harihar Ramchandra
Bhahirsasane
Vishwakarma Saw Mill
Shewala
6 Bhalchandra Digambarrao
Patki
Yeshwant Saw Mill,
Kalamnuri.


PWD

The names and addresses of contractors with the details of equipments,available with them.These contractors can help in repairs of roads, bridges and buildings, construction of relief camps, clearance of debris etc.

Sr.
No.
Names of
Contractor
Address
& Ph.no.
Details of Machinery & Equipments
Available with Contractor .
1 M/s K.M. Palwe Prabhavati Nager,
Parbhani 20932
Concreate Mixer, Diesel Cncreate
Hybrator, Petrol Engine, Truck No. MH-22-266, 2-tractors, 1 Jeep and 1 Car , Water Pamp
2 M/s Rameshwar Rametakli
Dist.
Parbhani
62140
Truck MHB-5481 & MTS- 3371, Construction Tractor MXV 8782, & MH22-6314, Jeep M.S.V-8307 , Tata Hitachi and
Roller
3 Radhakishan
Ramrao Nikam
Dnaneshwar Nager
Parbhani
and Concrete Mixer
Truck MH-B-3408, Motorcycle 4995
& 9344, Blower, Asfalt-2 , Mixer
4 S.R. MUTHA NEHRU ROAD, PURNA
55141
VIBRATOR, ROLLER, KIRLOSKAR ENGINE, Crusher, Truck & Hand-Mixer, Asfalt Mixer, Concrete Mixer
5 Jethlal Narayan
Naryan & sons
Ajub Nager,
Kranti Chouk
Aurangabad Firm
at Parbhani.
24145 (Pbn)
J.C.B., 3 trucks, 5 tractors, 5 Trolley
Roller, 2-Water Pump, Water Tanker
Trolly
6 S.N. Bembalkar Muncipal Colny
Parbhani
Truck, Roller, Concreat Mixer, diesel
Engine, Vabrator
7 L.K. Parmar Vallub Nager,
Parli Vaijnath
Br. At Parbhani
2-Truck, Tractor, Roller, Air
Compressor, Asfalt Mixer.
8 R.B. Ghodke At Pimpri Post
Gome Wakdi
Tq. Sailu
AND
Lokmanya Nager
Parbhani, 48286
2-Truck, 2-Tractor, Dumber
Jeep, Stone crusher, Water tanker
9 S.B. Kate Dnyneshwar Nager
Parbhani
2- Tractor, Jeep, J.C.B., Air
Compressor, Kirloskar Engine
10 K.B. PARMAR PARMAR COLONY
Parli Vaijnath
Br. Parbhahi
2-TATA HITACHI , TRUCK, TIPPER,
Roller
11 Bhari Builers D/404, Kirti
Apartment Behind
Sarthi Studio
Yella Reddy Guda
Hyedrabad Br. At
Parbhani
Air Compressor, Water Tanker
Concreate Mixer, Water Pump
Jack Hammer, 5-Tippers & Jeep
12 S.C. Sharma Subhash Road,
Parbhani
Tipper, Jeep, Roller
13 Balaji Hotmix
Company
Someshwar
Tq. Banswada
Dist. Nizamabad
(A.P.) Br.At.
Parbhani
7-Tipper, 2-Tractor,3-Roller
J.C.B., Asfult, Hotmix Plant,
3-Stone Crusher, Janger
14 R.P. Jethwani Vinod Bhavan
Near Govt.Hospital
Parbhani
1177
Truck,Water Tanker, 2-Roller
15 S.B. Sager Ekta Nager Nanded
Br. At Parbhani.
Stone Crusher, Roller, Truck
Mixer, Asfault , Biloer, C.C. Mixer
Vibrator.
16 T.B. Parmar Vidhya Nage,
Parli Vaijnath
Br. At Parbhani
23327
Roller, J.C.B.,Tractor, 2-Tipper,
Mixer
17 N.T. Fad Kaylan Nager
Parbhani
Truck, Ambasder Car, 8-Diesel
Eigine
18 18. S.B. Deualkar Vishnu Nager,
Parbhani
22605
2-Truck, Tractor, Roller, Jeep
Tanker
19 A.M. Rathod Kalyan Nager,
Parbhani
Tractor, Vibrator, Diesel Engine,
C.C. Mixer
20 Himatkhan
Hamidkhan
Tamsa Tq.
Hadgaon
Dist. Nanded
Br.At Parbhani
Vibrator, Diesel Engine,Roller
C.C.Mixer, Electric Moter
21 R.S.Kate Dnyashwar Nager,
Parbhani
Diesel Engine, Concreate Mixer
22 Goyal Construction Dargha Road,
Parbhani
Truck, Crusher,Concreat Mixer
Asfult Mixer, Eletric Moter
23 D.P. Soni Post Office Road
Hingoli
Stone Crusher, Concreate Mixer
Asfult Mixer, Vibrator
24 V.D. Korwar Station Road,
Hingoli
Vibrator, Kirloskar Engine,
Crusher.
25 25 V.P. Dhanorkar Nanal Peth,
Parbhani
Truck Roller, Water tanker,
Stone Mixer, Asflut Mixer,
Bioler, Concrete Mixer
26 Vishnu S. Mundada Mondha Road,
Basmat
Vibrator, Kirloskar Engine
26 26 Rafut Ahemad Khan Near Shihi Masjid
Parbhani
Vibrator, Kirloskar Engine,
Concreate Mixer Asfult Mixer
27 Priya Construction
Shri S.H. Rathod
Daregaon Tq.
Aundha
Vibrator, Kirloskar Engine,
Water Tanker, Asfult Mixer
28 Sk.Abdul Salim
Abdul Nabi
Mumtaz Nager
Parbhani
Vibrator,Hand Mixer, Kirloskar
Engine.
29 Kausar Construction Raje Mohalla
Sailu
2-Truck, 3-Jeep,3-Tractor,
Roller, Concreat Mixer
29 M/s Pratima
Construction
A.Balapur
Tq. Kalamnuri
Roller, Diesel Concreat
Water Pump
30 Samir Construction Dargha Road,
Parbhani
Tractor, Crusher, Vibrator,
Boiler Truck
30 M/s Jagdish Shiva
Constructions
N.P. Vasmatkar
Vaibhav Nager,
Parbhani
Tractor, Roller, Asfalt Mixer
Concreat Mixer
31 B.D. Khule Yeshwant Nager
Parbhani
2-Truck, Kirloskar Engine,
Tractor
32 Ravi Construction Mamta Colony
Parbhani
Tractor, Kirloskar Engine
33 Sailash D.Soni Post Office Road,
Hingoli
Tractor
34 M/s Sanjay
Construction
Santh Janabai
Nager, Gangakhed
Crusher, Tractor, Jeep, Mixer
35 M/s Vaidynath
Construction
Shivram Nager,
Parbhani
2-Truck, Roller, Tractor
36 U.D. Chaula Tofkhana Hingoli Vibrator, Kirloskar Engine
Mixer Concrete
36 M/s Kachve
Constructions
Shivram Nager,
Parbhani.
2-Truck, Roller, Water tanker
Tractor, Asfalt Mixer
37 M/s Aziz
Constructions
Hinayat Nager,
Parbhani
Jeep, Concrete Mixer,
Kirloskar Engine, Vibrator
38 Atmaram Pawar Kanhergaon Naka
Tq. Hingoli
Tractor, Roller, Vibrator
39 M.Y.Khan Mahatpuri Tq.
Gangakhed
2-Trucks, Roller, Concreat
mixer
40 Shripad
Constructions
Prop. D.G.
Daithankar
Sinchan Nager
Parbhani.
Truck, Vibrator, Mixer
41 Chavan Construction
Kishan R.Chavan
Dadarao Plot,
Parbhani
Truck
42 Altaf Construction
Prop. Ismil Khan
Wahed Khan
Ikbal Nager,
Parbhani
Truck, Tractor,Vibrator
Concrete Mixer
43 S.G. Mahajan Station Road
Parbhani
Kirloskar Engine, Vibrator
Concrete Mixer, Asfalt Mixer
44 Sk.Duran Sk.Munu Garmal,
Tq. Hingoli
Truck, Crusher, Asfalt Mixer
Vibrator, Concreat Mixer, Tractor
45 Prayag Construction Muncipal
Colony Parbhani
2-Truck, Tractor, Jeep, 2-Roller
Concreat Mixer, Vibrator


Agricultural Department

The Wholesalers of Seeds , Fertilisers and Pest Control in Parbhani District are as under

Sr. No.
Place
Name of Firm
and Owner
Phone
No.
Shop
No.
1 Parbhani M/s Vija Faertilizers Agency
Vijay Prakash Onkarlal Agrwal.
45717 408
2 Parbhani M/s Kamdhenu Bhumiputra
Mahaveer Prasad,Bansilal Zazri
23738
20541
277
3 Parbhani Ganesh Krishi Vikas Kendra
NandKishor Balram Sarda
45389
45889
45689 (R)
387/3
4 Parbhani M/s Chandrakan Eklare
Chandrakant Eklare
------ 4-2-20
5 Parbhani Vasundhara Seeds & Fertilizers
Rajendrakumar M. Agrwal
------ 17
6 Parbhani Shetkari Seva Kendra
Shivprasad Tadsta Satpute
21694 3-3
7 Parbhani Durgeshwari Seeds & Fatilizers
Santosh Onkarlal Agrwal
------  
8 Parbhani Maheshwari Trading Company
Anilkumar Ramniwas Oaza
------ 1
9 Parbhani Kheti Agencies
Sukhmal Kisanlal Mutha
----- 425
10 Parbhani Rashimi Taders
Madhusudan Dawarkadas Malpani
---- 7
11 Parbhani Kisan Krishi Udyog
Satyanarayan Ramlal Maniyar
---- 259/2
12 Parbhani Shriram Traders
Govindlal Ramlal Agrwal
----- 29
13 Parbhani Jantara Krishi Kendra
Rajesh Janardhanrao Agrwal
----- 439
14 Parbhani Shelke Krishi Seva
Sanjay Munjaji Shelke
---- 435
15 Purna M/s Baba Ramappa Eklare --
Sitaramappa Babaappa Eklare
----- 4-2-20
16 Purna Nishikant Eklare & compny
Apparao Babarao Ekalare
------ 4-1-24
4-1-25
17 Purna Kotwar Krishi kendra
Kishore Rangnath Kotwar
----- 4-1-75
18 Purna Parve Agencies
Rangnath Sanbhaji Parve
----- 4-5-54
19 Gangakhed Jaikisan Traders Jugal Kishore
Ramvilas Rathi
22102 10-3-3
20 Gangakhed Rajendra Seeds & Fertelisers
Rajendra Balaram Lodha
------ -------
21 Gangakhed Shyam Krishi Kendra
Sheshrao Sopanrao Niras
---- 74/3-3
22 Sonpeth Balaji Krshi Kendra
Kiran Shyamrao Chwodalwar
------ --------
23 Gangakhed Kamdhenu Ferteliser
Vishnudas Meghraj Tapdiya
----- 73-3--3
24 Gangakhed Annapurna Treders
Mehendra kumar Dwarakadasji
Bhandari
------ 1-3-3
25 Ranisaver gaon
Dnyaneshwar ferteliser
Chandrakant Purbhaji Gujnar
----- 271
26 Palam Nandkumar krishi kendra ----- 13.68
27 Pathri Pame Krishi Kendra ---------  
28 Manwat M/s Porwal Krishi sadhan
Kendra , Jaypraksh Ramgopl
Porwal
-------- 6-7-1/1
29 Manwat M/s Ishwar Krishi Kendra
Badrinarayan Satyanarayan
Lohoti
(02451)
44219
6-7-9
6-7-89
30 Manwat Godavari Krishi Kendra
Tarun Kumar Rambalal
----- -----
31 Manwat Deepak Krishi Kendra
Hanuman Mahadeo M.K.
----- 12
32 Manwat Agro Service Sentre
Balkishan Pannalal Madak
------ /5/105
33 Pathri Krishi Pagati Centre
Rajeev Shank Pame
------ ------
34 Sailu Ramvilas Shilegram ----- -----
35 Sailu Motilal Rameshwar Bhutada ---- -----
36 Sailu Rahul Trading Company ------ -----
37 Sailu Mirge Agro Service ------ ------
38 Sailu Bhutada Brothers ------ -----
39 Sailu Mantri Traders ----- ------
40 Jintur Adarsh Seeds & fertilizers ----- -----
41 Jintur Sumitra Fertilizer ----- ------
42 Jintur Pandurang Traders ---- -----
43 Jintur Balaji Fertilizers ---- -----
44 Jintur Sawati Agro Service ----- -----
45 Bori Jagdamba Krishi Kendra ------ -----
46 Yeldari Bhutada Krishi Kendra ----- ------
47 Hingoli M/s Balaji Krishi Kendra ----- ------
48 Hingoli M/s Paturkar & Sons ----- -----
49 Hingoli M/s Yadav Rambhau Halge ----- -----
50 Hingoli M/s Nitin Tading Comany ----- -----
51 Hingoli M/s Baj Brothers Hingoli ---- -----
52 Hingoli M/s RameshKumar Rajendra
Parasad, Agrwal
----- ------
53 Hingoli Godavari Traders, ------ ------
54 Hingoli Vijay Krishi Kendra ------ ------
55 Hingoli Shetki Bhandar Hingoli ----- ------
56 Hingoli Malpani Brothers ------ -------
57 Aundha Sanjay Agencies ------ -------
58 Sengaon Sitesh Krishi Kendra ----- ------
59 Sengaon Om Krishi Kendra ----- ------
60 Sengaon Nagesh Krishi Kendra ----- ------
61 Basmat M/s Shetkari Seva Kendra ------ ------
62 Basmat B.R. Chainpoorkar ------ ------
63 Basmat C.A. Chapke ----- ------
64 Basmat Baheti Krishi Kendra ----- -----
65 Kurunda Shri Sai Fertilizer ----- -----
66 Basmat Ganesh Traders ---- ------
67 Basmat Arivin Trading Company ----- ------
68 Kalamnuri Shetki Bhandar ----- ------
69 Kalamnuri Pankaj Seeds & Fertilizers ----- -----
70 A. Balapur Vijay Agro Agencies ----- ------
71 A. Balapur Shyam Traders ----- -----
72 A. Balapur Gajananbaba Seeds & Fertilizers ------ -----
73 Dongkarkada Rajesh Krishi Kendra ----- -----
74 A. Balapur Ramesh Kumar Rajendra Kumar
Agrwal
----- -----
75 A. Balapur Giriraj Krishi Agencies ----- ------


R.T.O

List of Private Bus Owners

 Sr.No.

 

Name of Bus Owner & Place

No.of Buses

     1

Brijlal  Khurana, Hingoli

   23

     2

Kishanlal Bothraj  Nagpal, Hingoli

   1

     3  

Jaiswal Brother, Hingoli

   4

     4

Jaiswal Brother, Hingoli

   3

     5

Pathan Salim Abdul Majid Khan, Hingoli

   2

     6

Arun  Keshav Sawant  

   1

     7

Ghuri Faraha  Naz Md. Akbar, Parbhani

   1

     8

Pratap Raosaheb  Jamkar, Parbhani

   3

     9

Sunil  Jain,  Hingoli

   2

   10

Prabhavati  Tours  &  Traveles, Parbhani

   1 

   11

Balaji  Baliram Selmohkar, Gangakhed 

   1

   12

Bhalchandra  Dattaba Morate, Jamb(Pbn)

   1

   13

Mohan Vithalrao More, Purna

   1

   14

Nagorao Narayanrao Patange, A.Balapur

   1

   15

Md. Harun Md. Davood, Basmat

   1

   16

Govind Satwaji  Nandapurkar, Parbhani

   1 

   17

Nagraj Dadarao  Joshi, Parbhani 

   1  

   18

Mustak  Khan Rahim Khan,  Wadgaon

   1

   19

Sunil Monohar  Sawji, Hingoli

   2

   20

Sonaji Abasaheb Malewar, Parbhani 

   1

   21

Sunil  Jagdish Somani, Parbhani

   2

  

Total  Buses

  54


Health Department

List of Private Doctors with Speciality.

                                                          Speciality : 

G.S. : General        D.T.    : Dermatologists  OPS : Opthamologists  PAE : Paediatrician

O.S. : Orthepedic   E.N.S.: E.N.S.                DEN: Dentist.               PHY : Physician

G/N : Gynaeogists G.P.    : General              PSY : Psychlatrist        CRD : Cardologist                                                                          

Sr No

Name  of  Hospital & Doctor

Qual

Spl

          Address

Phone Nos.

1

Dr. S.U. Gaikwad

DGO

G/N

Sonali  Hospital Basmat, Road, Parbhani

20794

2

Dr.H.N. Nankhedkar

MD

PHY

Shivaji  Nager, Parbhani

23808

3

Dr. P.Muley

D.Orth

OS

Shivaji Nager, Parbhani

23907

4

5

Dr. V.Navandar

Dr. P.Navandar

MS.Or

--do--

OS

OS

Shivaji Nager, Parbhani

24026

 

6

Dr.Anil Diwan

DCH

PAE

Shivaji Nager, Parbhnai

23004

7

8

Dr. B.S. Narvade

Dr. Mrs. S.B.Narvade

MD

MD

PHY

G/N

Shivaji Nager, Parbhani

24249

 

9

Dr. Mrs. U.S. Zambre

DGO

G/N

Shivaji Nager, Parbhani

23969

10

Dr. Inder Ostwal

MS

OPS

Near Bus Stand Parbhani

21011

11

12

Dr. U.N.Chandak

Dr.Mrs. S.C.Chandak

MS

DGO

GS

G/N

Chandak Hospital, Near

Bus Stand, Parbhani

22553

13

Dr. G. Javade

MD

PHY

Javade Hospital Shivaji Nager, Parbhani

23995

14

Dr. M. S. Mavalge

MS

GS

Mavalge Hospital Near  Bus stand,  Parbhani

22060

15

Dr. R.P. Kalkote

MS.

OPT

OPS

Kalkote  Hospital, Near

Bus Stand, Parbhani

21885

16

17

Dr. Ganesh Chavan

Dr. R.B. Chavan

M.S

MD

GS

PHY

Chavan  Hospital, Near

Bus Stand, Parbhani

23879

18

19

Dr. P.Y. Dhanorkar

Dr. Mrs. Dhanorkar

MD

DGO

PHY

G/N

Dhanorkar Hospital,Near

Bus Stand, Parbhani

23646

20565

20

Dr. D.M. Mager

MD.

DGO

G/N

Mager Hospital, R. Laxmibai Road, Parbhani

20332

21

22

Dr. S.M. Maslekar

Dr. Mrs. Maslekar

MS.Or

MD

OS

G/N

Maslekar Hospital, Station Road, Parbhani

21000

23

24

Dr. S.S. Deshpande

Dr. Mrs.Deshpande

TDD

DGO

PHY

G/N

Kranti Chock, Parbhani

23146

21505

25

Dr. S. Umrikar

MS

GS

Umrikar Hospital, Near

Civil Hospital, Parbhani

20878

26

Dr. B.T. Dhumal

D.Orth

OS

Dhumal Hospital, Near Civil Hospital, Parbhani

23249


Sr

No

Name  of  Hospital

& Doctor

Qual

Spl

          Address

Phone

Nos.

27

Dr. Vaijwade

M.S.

Eye

OPS

Vaijwade Hospital, Near

Bus Stand, Parbhani

20829

28

Dr. S. Deshmukh

MD

PHY

Deshmukh Hospital, Near Bus stand, Parbhani

23270

29

Dr. R. Ahuja

DGO

G/N

Basmath Road, Parbhani

23350

30

31

Dr. H.B. Tamboli

Dr. Mrs. Tamboli

MD

DGO

PHY

G/N

Tamboli Hospital,

Ekbal Nager, Parbhani

23456

 

32

Dr. Mrs. B. Kausar

DGO

G/N

Kausar Hospital,

Azad Road, Parbhani

22752

33

34

Dr. S. Partani

Dr. Mrs.Partani

MD

MBBS

PHY

G/N

Partani Hospital, Near Bus stand, Parbhani

21344

23868

35

36

Dr. S.S. Somani

Dr. Mrs.Somani

DCH

DGO

PAE

G/N

Somani Hospital, Near Bus stand, Parbhani

 

37

38

Dr. P.S. Patil

Dr. Mrs.Patil

DGO

DGO

G/N

G/N

Patil Hospital, Near

Bus Stand, Parbhani.

20967

39

Dr. Ramgopal Kalani

DCH

PAE

Kalani Hospital, Near

Bus Stand, Parbhani

22531

40

Dr. Vilas Deshmukh

MBBS

Orth.

OS

Deshmukh Hospital Near

Narayan Chal, Parbhani

22612

41

42

Dr.S.N.Katneshwarkar

Dr.Mrs.Katneshwarkar

MS

BDS

GS

DEN

Katneshwarkar Hospital,

Near Petrol Pump,Pbn.

23965

43

Dr. B.M. More

MD

PAE

More Hospital, Near

Bus stand, Parbhani

22002

44

Dr. B.R. Soni

DCH

PAE

Soni Hospital, Subhash Road, Parbhani

23218

45

Dr. S.N. Muthkhedar

DCH

PAE

Muthkhedkar Hospital, Subhash Road, Parbhani

23707

46

Dr. R. Manwatkar

MD

PHY

Manwatkar Hospital, Gawhane Road,Parbhani

20013

47

Dr. M.T. Jadhav

DCH

PAE

Jadhav Hospital, Kadrabad Plot, Parbhani

22442

48

Dr. Arun Watamwar

MS

GS

Watamwar Hospital, Gawhane Road,Parbhani

 

49

Dr. Sanjay Takalkar

MS

OPS

Takalkar Hospital, Gawhane Road,Parbhani

21842

50

Dr. Dinesh Gaul

MS

ENT

ENS

Gaul Hospital, Gawhane Road, Parbhani.

20794

51

Dr. A.L. Deshpande

MD

G/N

Deshpande Hospital, Main Road, Sailu

 

52

Dr. R.E. Jawlekar

MBBS

GP

Jawlekar Hospital, Basmat Nager

 

53

Dr. U.B. Bhagangre

BAMS

GP

Bhaganagre Hospital, Basmat Nager

 

Sr No

Name  of  Hospital & Doctor

Qual

Spl

          Address

Phone Nos.

54

Dr. S.Bagdiya

MBBS

G/N

Bagdiya Hospital, Hingoli

 

55

56

Dr. S.R. Tapdiya

Dr. Mrs. Tapdiya

MD

DGO

PHY

G/N

Tapdiya Hospital, Hingoli

 

57

Dr. G.P. Banger

MS

GS

Banger Hospital, Shivaji Road, Hingoli

 

58

Dr. G.N. Welankar

MBBS

GP

Bank Colony, Basmat Road, Parbhani

23048

59

Dr. U.S. Wankhede

MBBS

GP

Near  T.V. Centre

23792

60

Dr. V.M. Wakure

MBBS

GP

Jijamata Road, Parbhani

21252

61

Dr. G.B. Ghuge

MD

PHY

Near BusStand,Parbhani

 

62

Dr. H.K. Bhosale

DOMS

OPS

Shivaji Nager, Parbhani

23984

63

Dr. S.Kulkarni

BAMS

GP

Jagruti Colony,Parbhani

23841

64

Dr. D.K. Omanwar

DGO

GN

Bank Colony Parbhani

22554

65

Dr. A.N. Shelke

DGO

GN

Shivaji Nager, Parbhani

23543

66

Dr. N. Zarkar

MS

GS

Shivaji Nager, Parbhani

21824

67

Dr. Sachin Pathak

MS

GP

Old  Pedgaon Road, Parbhani

23011

68

Dr. Mrs. Pathak

MBBS

GP

Old  Pedgaon Road, Parbhani

23011

69

Dr. Tornekar

DHMS

GP

Shivaji  Nager, Parbhani

 

70

Dr. B.K. Hussum

MBBS

GP

Azad  Road, Parbhani

 

71

Dr. Choudhari

DGO

G/N

Gawhane Road, Parbhani

23607

72

Dr. G.A. Ghan

MBBS

G/N

Azad Road, Parbhani

 

73

Dr. K. Choudhari

ENS

ENS

Gawhane Road, Parbhani

 

74

Dr. S.A. Khatib

MBBS

GP

Gawhane Road,

Parbhani

 

75

Dr. M.V. Reddy

MBBS

GP

Deshmukh Galli, Parbhani

22930

76

Dr. Lakhmawar

DOMS

OPS

Near Bus Stand Parbhani

 

77

Dr. G.R. Wagh

MS

GS

Near Bus Stand, Parbhani

23035

78

Dr. Raghunath Rathod

MS

GS

Bus Stand Parbhani

23716

79

Dr. Anil Kanhe

MD

GP

Near Shivaji Statue, Parbhani

 

80

Dr. D.C. Athawle

ENT

ENS

Near Shivaji Statue, Parbhani

20350

81

Dr. M. Dongaonkar

BDS

DEN

Near Bus Stand, Parbhani

20565

82

Dr. A. Jain

BDS

DEN

Near Bus Stand, Parbhani

20912

83

Dr. Kalayani

MS.Ort

OS

Near Civil Hospital Parbhani.

 



Sr No

Name  of  Hospital & Doctor

Qual

Spl

          Address

Phone Nos.

84

Dr. B.S. Kardekar

MD

PAE

Subash Road, Parbhani

21801

85

Dr. Doypode

MS

ENT

Subash Road, Parbhani

22624

86

Dr. U.Gore

MBBS

GP

Kadrabad Plot, Parbhani

21855

87

Dr. R.S. Mali

MD

PHY

Kadrabad Plot, Parbhani

23960

88

Dr. G.B. Kulkarni

MS ENT

ENS

Kadrabad Plot, Parbhani

 

89

Dr. S.Maniyar

MBBS

GP

Pedgaon Road, Parbhani

 

90

Dr. Manik Kadam

DVD

DT

Station Road, Parbhani

 

91

Dr. S. Johad

DVD

DT

Near Bus Stand, Parbhani

 

92

Dr. Kendrekar

MBBS

GP

Vidya Nager, Parbhani

 

93

Dr. Suhas Vibhute

MBBS

GP

Vidya Nager, Parbhani

 

94

Dr. Yusufuddin

MBBS

GP

Dargha Road, Parbhani

 

95

Dr. A. Talnikar

BAMS

GP

Dargha Road, Parbhani

 

96

Dr. Jafar Ali

DHMS

PAE

Ekbal Nager, Parbhani

 

97

Dr. N.G. Holani

MBBS

GP

Jintur, Dist. Parbhani

 

98

Dr. Sanjay Joshi

DHMS

GP

Jintur, Dist. Parbhani

 

99

Dr. Mrs. V.S. Joshi

DHMS

GP

Jintur, Dist. Parbhani

 

100

Dr. Pradip Bhandari

BAMS

GP

Jintur, Dist. Parbhani

 

101

Dr. Mrs. Bhandari

BAMS

GP

Jintur, Dist. Parbhani

 

102

Dr. B.C. Saboo

MBBS

GP

Jintur, Dist. Parbhani

 

103

Dr. B.C. Agrwal

MBBS

GP

Jintur, Dist. Parbhani

 

104

Dr. M.K. Biyani

DHB

GP

Jintur, Dist. Parbhani

 

105

Dr. Liyakat Kadri

MBBS

GP

Jintur, Dist. Parbhani

 

106

Dr. Chavandke

DGO

G/N

Jintur, Dist. Parbhani

 

107

Dr. B.Q.Chavan

MBBS

GP

Bori Tq, Jintur

 

107

Dr. N.K. Dhumal

MBBS

GB

Bori Tq. Jintur

 

108

Dr. Sambhaji Rodge

OPTH

OPS

Station Road, Sailu

 

109

Dr. S.V. Kulkarni

MD

PHY

Station Road, Sailu

 

110

Dr. S.M. Lohiya

DOMS

OPS

Station Road, Sailu

 

111

Dr.S.S. Kulkarni

MBBS

PHY

Station Road, Sailu

 

112

Dr. M.K. Ghule

MD

PHY

Main Road, Gangakhed

 

113

Dr. P.B. Gundre

MBBS

G/N

Main Road, Gangakhed

 

114

Dr. Sidharth Bhalerao

MD

PHY

Main Road, Gangakhed

 

115

Dr. R.B. Biyani

MBBS

GP

Main Road, Gangakhed

 

116

Dr. Vijay Badae

MS

GS

SardaColonyGangakhed

 

117

Dr. D.B. Ladda

MBBS

GP

Manwat Tq. Pathri

 

118

Dr. B.L. Dhamdhere

MBBS

GP

Manwat Tq. Pathri

 

119

Dr. D.M. Pensalwar

MBBS

PAE

Manwat Tq. Pathri

 

120

Dr. S.K. Dhanwle

MD

GP

Manwat Tq. Pathri

 

121

Dr. L.Kadri

MS

GP

Manwat Tq. Pathri

 

122

Dr. M.B. Dagdu

MBBS

GP

Manwat Tq. Pathri

 

123

Dr. D. Chabda

MD

PHY

Manwat Tq. Pathri

 

124

Dr. T.S. Chabda

DCH

PAE

Manwat Tq. Pathri

 

125

Dr. Mudgalkar

MBBS

GP

Pathri Dist. Parbhani

 

126

Dr. Tengse

MBBS

GP

Pathri Dist. Parbhani

 



Sr No

Name  of  Hospital & Doctor

Qual

Spl

          Address

Phone Nos.

127

Dr. Ranjwan

MBBS

GP

Pathri Dist. Parbhani

 

128

Dr. Kondawar

DCH

PAE

Basmat  Dist. Parbhani

 

129

Dr. N.S. Sakle

MBBS

GP

Basmat Dist. Parbhani

 

130

Dr. S. Ambekar

MBBS

GP

Basmat Dist. Parbhani

 

131

Dr. D.N. Lalpotu

MBBS

GP

Basmat Dist. Parbhani

55468

132

Dr. G.D. Kabra

MBBS

GP

Hingoli  Dist. Parbhani

 

133

Dr. Gahilot

MBBS

GP

Hingoli  Dist. Parbhani

 

134

Dr. S.G. Nahar

MD

PAE

Sadar Bazar, Hingoli

 

135

Dr. Mrs. M.S. Ghahae

MD

PHY

Sadar Bazar, Hingoli

 

136

Dr. D.H. Bhale

DGO

G/N

Shivaji Nager,Hingoli

 

137

Dr. K.H. Giri

MS

GS

Shivaji Takiz Road, Hingoli

 

138

Dr. Agrwal

BDS

DEN

Sadar Bazar, Hingloli

 

139

Dr. R. Kabra

DOMS

OPS

Bus Stand Road,Hingoli

 

140

Dr. R.P. Chilkewar

MBBS

GP

Aundha Dist. Parbhani

 

141

Dr. B.G. Lahane

MBBS

GP

At Palam Dist. Parbhani

 

142

Dr. Kuldipke

MBBS

GP

Sonpeth Tq. Gangakhed

 

143

Dr. P.C. Shetre

MBBS

GP

Sonpeth Tq. Gangakhed

 

144

Dr. Choudhari

MBBS

GP

Pathri  Dist. Parbhani

 

List of Private Hospitals with No. of Beds

                                                          Speciality : 

G.S. : General        D.T.    : Dermatologists  OPS : Opthamologists  PAE : Paediatrician

O.S. : Orthopaedic E.N.T: E.N.T.                DEN: Dentist.               PHY : Physician

G/N : Gynaeogists G.P.    : General              PSY : Psychlatrist        CRD : Cardologist                                                                           

Sr No

Name  of  Hospital & Doctor

Qul

Spl

Beds

          Address

Phone Nos.

1

Dr. S.U. Gaikwad

DGO

G/N

10

Sonali  Hospital Basmat, Road, Parbhani

20794

2

Dr.H.N. Nankhedkar

MD

PHY

10

Shivaji  Nager, Parbhani

23808

3

Dr. P.Muley

D.Orth

OS

10

Shivaji Nager, Parbhani

23907

4

5

Dr. V.Navandar

Dr. P.Navandar

MS.Or

--do--

OS

OS

15

Shivaji Nager, Parbhani

24026

 

6

Dr.Anil Diwan

DCH

PAE

10

Shivaji Nager, Parbhnai

23004

7

8

Dr. B.S. Narvade

Dr. Mrs. S.B.Narvade

MD

MD

PHY

G/N

10

Shivaji Nager, Parbhani

24249

 

9

Dr. Mrs. U.S. Zambre

DGO

G/N

10

Shivaji Nager, Parbhani

23969

10

Dr. Inder Ostwal

MS

OPS

10

Near Bus Stand Parbhani

21011

11

12

Dr. U.N.Chandak

Dr.Mrs. S.C.Chandak

MS

DGO

GS

G/N

10

 

Chandak Hospital, Near

Bus Stand, Parbhani

22553

13

Dr. G. Javade

MD

PHY

10

Javade Hospital Shivaji Nager, Parbhani

23995

14

Dr. M. S. Mavalge

MS

GS

10

Mavalge Hospital Near  Bus stand,  Parbhani

22060

15

Dr. R.P. Kalkote

MS.

OPT

OPS

10

Kalkote  Hospital, Near

Bus Stand, Parbhani

21885

16

17

Dr. Ganesh Chavan

Dr. R.B. Chavan

M.S

MD

GS

PHY

10

10

Chavan  Hospital, Near

Bus Stand, Parbhani

23879

18

19

Dr. P.Y. Dhanorkar

Dr. Mrs. Dhanorkar

MD

DGO

PHY

G/N

10

Dhanorkar Hospital,Near

Bus Stand, Parbhani

23646

20565

20

Dr. D.M. Mager

MD.

DGO

G/N

10

Mager Hospital, R. Laxmibai Road, Parbhani

20332

21

22

Dr. S.M. Maslekar

Dr. Mrs. Maslekar

MS.Or

MD

OS

G/N

15

 

Maslekar Hospital, Station Road, Parbhani

21000

23

24

Dr. S.S. Deshpande

Dr. Mrs.Deshpande

TDD

DGO

PHY

G/N

10

Kranti Chock, Parbhani

23146

21505

25

Dr. S. Umrikar

MS

GS

10

Umrikar Hospital, Near

Civil Hospital, Parbhani

20878

26

Dr. B.T. Dhumal

D.Orth

OS

10

Dhumal Hospital, Near Civil Hospital, Parbhani

23249

27

Dr. Vaijwade

M.S.

Eye

OPS

10

Vaijwade Hospital, Near

Bus Stand, Parbhani

20829



Sr No

Name  of  Hospital & Doctor

Qul

Spl

Beds

          Address

Phone Nos.

28

Dr. S. Deshmukh

MD

PHY

10 

 

Deshmukh Hospital, Near Bus stand, Parbhani

23270

29

Dr. R. Ahuja

DGO

G/N

10

Basmath Road, Parbhani

23350

30

31

Dr. H.B. Tamboli

Dr. Mrs. Tamboli

MD

DGO

PHY

G/N

10

 

Tamboli Hospital,

Ekbal Nager, Parbhani

23456

 

32

Dr. Mrs. B. Kausar

DGO

G/N

10

Kausar Hospital,

Azad Road, Parbhani

22752

33

34

Dr. S. Partani

Dr. Mrs.Partani

MD

MBBS

PHY

G/N

10

Partani Hospital, Near Bus stand, Parbhani

21344

23868

35

36

Dr. S.S. Somani

Dr. Mrs.Somani

DCH

DGO

PAE

G/N

10

 

Somani Hospital, Near Bus stand, Parbhani

 

37

38

Dr. P.S. Patil

Dr. Mrs.Patil

DGO

DGO

G/N

G/N

10

 

Patil Hospital, Near

Bus Stand, Parbhani.

20967

39

Dr. Ramgopal Kalani

DCH

PAE

10

Kalani Hospital, Near

Bus Stand, Parbhani

22531

40

Dr. Vilas Deshmukh

MBBS

Orth.

OS

05

Deshmukh Hospital Near

Narayan Chal, Parbhani

22612

41

42

Dr.S.N.Katneshwarkar

Dr.Mrs.Katneshwarkar

MS

BDS

GS

DEN

10

Katneshwarkar Hospital,

Near Petrol Pump,Pbn.

23965

43

Dr. B.M. More

MD

PAE

10

More Hospital, Near

Bus stand, Parbhani

22002

44

Dr. B.R. Soni

DCH

PAE

05

Soni Hospital, Subhash Road, Parbhani

23218

45

Dr. S.N. Muthkhedar

DCH

PAE

05

Muthkhedkar Hospital, Subhash Road, Parbhani

23707

46

Dr. R. Manwatkar

MD

PHY

10

Manwatkar Hospital, Gawhane Road,Parbhani

20013

47

Dr. M.T. Jadhav

DCH

PAE

05

Jadhav Hospital, Kadrabad Plot, Parbhani

22442

48

Dr. Arun Watamwar

MS

GS

10

Watamwar Hospital, Gawhane Road,Parbhani

 

49

Dr. Sanjay Takalkar

MS

OPS

10

Takalkar Hospital, Gawhane Road,Parbhani

21842

50

Dr. Dinesh Gaul

MS

ENT

ENS

05

Gaul Hospital, Gawhane Road, Parbhani.

20794

51

Dr. A.L. Deshpande

MD

G/N

05

Deshpande Hospital, Main Road, Sailu

 

52

Dr. R.E. Jawlekar

MBBS

GP

05

Jawlekar Hospital, Basmat Nager

 

53

Dr. U.B. Bhagangre

BAMS

GP

05

Bhaganagre Hospital, Basmat Nager

 

54

Dr. S.Bagdiya

MBBS

G/N

05

Bagdiya Hospital, Hingoli

 

Sr No

Name  of  Hospital & Doctor

Qul

Spl

Beds

          Address

Phone Nos.

55

56

Dr. S.R. Tapdiya

Dr. Mrs. Tapdiya

MD

DGO

PHY

G/N

10

Tapdiya Hospital, Hingoli

 

57

Dr. G.P. Banger

MS

GS

10

Banger Hospital, Shivaji Road, Hingoli

 


Animal Husbandry

List of Veterinary Doctors

Sr. No.
Name of Doctor
Designation
Name of Hospital
1. Parbhani Tq
1 Dr. C.K. Lahankar Vet. Extn. Officer Veternary Hospital, Parbhani
2 Dr. Y.A. Khan --- do --- --- do ---, Zari
3 Dr. Katare --- do --- --- do ---, Pedgaon
4 Dr. M.A. Khan --- do --- --- do ---, Pokharni
5 Dr. P.A. Yogi --- do --- --- do ---, Takli K.
6 Dr. Vagatkar Live Stock Supervisor --- do ---, Jod Parli
7 Dr. Hanumante --- do --- --- do ---, Sadegaon
8 Shri. M.J. Khan --- do --- --- do ---, Mandakhali
9 Dr. Gulvelkar --- do --- --- do ---, Pingli
10 Shri A.S. Tallu --- do --- --- do ---, Bramahpuri
11 Shri. Galakatu --- do --- --- do ---, Daithna
12 Shri N.T. Pawar --- do --- --- do ---, Lohagaon
13 Shri. C.P. Ratnaparkhi --- do --- --- do ---, Malsonna
14 Shri M.E. Jadhav --- do --- --- do ---, Singnapur
15 Shri P.S. Kokad --- do --- --- do ---, Umri
16 Shri Abdul Razzak --- do --- --- do ---, Asola
2. Hingoli Tq.
1 Dr. B.W. Kale Vet. Extn Officer --- do ---, Hingoli
2 Dr. Kaiser Ahmad Khan --- do --- --- do ---, Narsi
3 Dr. Yerewar --- do --- --- do ---, Adgaon
4 Dr. Dankh --- do --- --- do ---, Shisan
5 Dr. A. Hamid Live Stock Supervisor --- do ---, Khanergaon
6 Vacant --- do --- --- do ---,Bhandegaon
7 Shri Dombe --- do --- --- do ---, Basamba
8 Shri Mule --- do --- --- do ---, Palsona
9 Shri L.S. Lokhande --- do --- --- do ---, Phalegaon
10 Shri B.T. Late --- do --- --- do ---, Pusegaon
11 Vacant --- do --- --- do ---, Deulgaon R
12 Shri Parde --- do --- --- do ---, Pimpri
13 Shri Giri --- do --- --- do ---, Malhivra
3. Aundha Tq.
1 Dr. P.N. Kashikar Vet. Entn. Officer --- do ---, Aundha
2 Dr. Kamble --- do --- --- do ---, Jawla B
3 Dr. Patil --- do --- --- do ---, Shird S.
4 Dr. P.N. Kashikar(Add.Charge) --- do --- --- do ---, Lakh
5 Shri Nakade Live Stoce Supervisor --- do ---, Jamghavan
6 Shri Potke --- do --- --- do ---, Sawangi
7 Shri Hashmi --- do --- --- do ---, Bhosi
8 Shri Sontakke --- do --- --- do ---, Ukhli
9 Shri Andhale A.T. --- do --- --- do ---, Salna
10 Shri Maige M.S. --- do --- --- do ---, Yelegaon
4. Purna Tq.
1 Dr. Santan Vet. Extn. Officer --- do ---, Purna
2 Dr. Vandankar -- do --- --- do ---, Chudava
3 Dr. Lipat -- do --- --- do ---, Kawalgaon
4 Dr. U.D. Jadhav -- do --- --- do ---, Erendshwar
5 Dr. Vandanka(Add.Charge) -- do --- --- do ---, Vajur
6 Shri Amil Kandhewar Live Stoce Supervisor --- do ---, Aeherwadi
7 Shri S.B. Khade --- do --- --- do ---, Dhngar T
8 Shri Magdewar --- do --- --- do ---, Tadkasa
5. Sengaon Tq.
1 Dr. Shinde Vet. Extn. Officer --- do ---, Sengaon
2 Dr. Adhawle --- do --- --- do ---, Ajegaon
3 Dr. Parde --- do --- --- do ---, Goregaon
4 Dr. Shinde(Add.Charge) --- do --- --- do ---, Sakhra
5 Shri Khnpate Live Stock Supervisor --- do—Pankanergaon
6 Shri Patil --- do --- --- do ---, Hatta
7 Shri Pathan --- do --- --- do ---, Varud (Ch)
8 Vacant --- do --- --- do ---, Kapadsinghi
9 Shri Paighan --- do --- --- do ---, Kawtha
6. Kalamnuri Tq.
1 Dr. Khandrkar Vet. Extn Officer --- do ---, Kalamnuri
2 Dr. S.S. Kulkarni --- do --- --- do ---, A. Balapur
3 Dr. Tanweer Ahmad --- do --- --- do ---, Dongarkada
4 Vacant --- do --- --- do ---, Potra
5 Dr. Kandharkar(Add.Charge) --- do --- --- do ---, Vakodi
6 Dr. Marakwar --- do --- --- do ---, Waranga P
7 Shri Morale Live Stock supervisor --- do ---, Salwa
8 Shri Badguger --- do --- --- do ---, Masode
9 Vacant --- do --- --- do ---, Yelegaon
10 Shri Masale --- do --- --- do ---, Rameshwar
11 Shri Kausalye --- do --- --- do ---, Kondur
12 Shri Itkapalle --- do --- --- do ---, Bhodhi
13 Shri. R.D. Magat --- do --- --- do ---, Khanapur
14 Shri. D.R. Kesade --- do --- --- do ---, Chincholi
15 Shri J.D. Nagergoje --- do --- --- do ---, Takli
16 Shri A.S. Deshmane --- do --- --- do ---, Nandapur
7 Gangakhed Tq.
1 Dr. Kurewad Vet. Extn Officer --- do ---, Gangakhed
2 Dr. Dharmadhikari --- do --- --- do ---, Mahatpuri
3 Dr. Khandalikar --- do --- --- do ---, Sonpeth
4 Dr. Khandalikar(Add. Charge) --- do --- --- do ---, Shewla
5 Dr. Kurewad (Add.Charge) --- do --- --- do ---, Rani S.
6 Shri K.B. Deshpande Live Stock Supervisor --- do ---, Isad
7 Shri Gore --- do --- --- do ---, Kanegaon
8 Shri K.S. Choudhari --- do --- --- do ---, Dharasur
9 Shri Garud --- do --- --- do ---, Ukhli
10 Shri Kawadkar --- do --- --- do ---, Boarda
11 Shri Ramteerth --- do --- --- do ---, Makni
12 Shri Baset --- do --- --- do ---,Mardhsgaon
13 Shri Tapre --- do --- --- do ---, Jadgaon
14 Shri Mankeshwar --- do --- --- do ---, Naikota
8. Basmat Tq.
1 Dr. R.J. Dawre Vet. Extn. Officer --- do ---, Jintur
2 Dr. R.J. Dawre(Add.Charge) --- do --- --- do ---, Bori
3 Dr. Shinde --- do --- --- do ---, Adgaon
4 Dr. Satpute --- do --- --- do ---, Charthana
5 Shri Betbhgre Live Stock Supervisor --- do ---, Vadhi
6 Shri Ieftekaroddin --- do --- --- do ---, Vazur
7 Shri Jalil Ahmad --- do --- --- do ---, Dhoodgaon
8 Shri Kharat --- do --- --- do ---, Pachegaon
9 Shri S.D. Deshmukh --- do --- --- do ---, Pangri
10 Shri P.S. Jadhav --- do --- --- do ---, Kausadi
11 Shri B.G. Donbe --- do --- --- do ---, Vassa
12 Vacant --- do --- --- do ---, Itoli
13 Shri Kamkhede --- do --- --- do ---, Bhogaon
14 Vacant --- do --- --- do ---, Ambarwadi
15 Shri Potdaar --- do --- --- do ---, Yeldari
16 Shri Sadiq Ali --- do --- --- do ---, Jogwada
17 Shri Joshi --- do --- --- do ---, Warud
18 Shri Kavrakhi --- do --- --- do ---, Pachlegaon
9. Basmat Tq.
1 Dr. V.S. Kamble Vet. Extn. Officer --- do ---, Basmat
2 Dr. V.B. Kulkarni --- do --- --- do ---, Kurunda
3 Dr. Bhurke --- do --- --- do ---, Hayatnager
4 Dr. Imam Qureshi --- do --- --- do ---, Vakhri
5 Shri Ingle Live Stock Supervisor --- do ---, Dhamngaon
6 Shri Kakde --- do --- --- do --,Dhamangaon
7 Shri Katare --- do --- --- do ---, Palshi
8 Shri S.K. Gadamwar --- do --- --- do ---,Khandegaon
9 Shri E.T. Gajre --- do --- --- do ---, Vai
10 Shri V.A. Sobitkar --- do --- --- do ---, Borala
11 Shri V.C. Babde --- do --- --- do ---, Aumba
12 Shri C.V. Kalaskar --- do --- --- do ---, Girgaon
13 Shri K.B. Hanuvate --- do --- --- do ---, Satephal
14 Shri Sirajoddin --- do --- --- do ---, Arul
15 Shri P.J. Shinde --- do --- --- do ---, Adgaon
16 Shri K.G. Chopde --- do --- --- do ---, Hatta
17 Shri U.M. Basude --- do --- --- do ---, Shirali
10. Pathri Tq.
1 Dr. N.L. Dhond Vet. Extn. Officer --- do ---, Pathri
2 Dr. R.B. Mobin --- do --- --- do ---, Rampuri Bk
3 Dr. H.K. Shaikh --- do --- --- do ---, Manwat
4 Dr. S.Y. Kulkarni --- do --- --- do ---, Gunj
5 Shri Ajhar Ahmad --- do --- --- do ---, Hadgaon
6 Shri T.N. Londhe --- do --- --- do ---, Kekarjawla
7 Vacant --- do --- --- do ---, Vakhala
8 Shri Rathod --- do --- --- do ---, Palodi
9 Dr. J.Khan --- do --- --- do ---, RampuriKh
10 Vacant --- do --- --- do ---, Kinohla
11. Saulu Tq.
1 Dr. Kute Vet. Extn. Officer --- do ---, Sailu
2 Dr. A. Rauf --- do --- --- do ---, Kolha
3 Dr. Choudhari --- do --- --- do ---, Vallur
4 Dr. N.L. Dixit --- do --- --- do ---, Kupta
5 Shri Joshi Live Stock Supervisor --- do ---, Dasala
6 Shri Solawar --- do --- --- do --,Dhamangaon
7 Shri Padamwar --- do --- --- do ---, Phadegaon
8 Shri Vatane --- do --- --- do ---, Borkini
9 Shri Khupse --- do --- --- do ---, Chikalthana
12. Palam Tq
1 Dr. Ghante Vet. Extn. Officer --- do ---, Palam
2 Dr. More --- do --- --- do ---, Banwas
3 Dr. Ghante (Add.Charge) --- do --- --- do ---, Raorajur
4 Shri Parange Live stock Supervisor --- do ---, Pethshivni
5 Shri Lahane --- do --- --- do ---, Chatori
6 Shri Salgare --- do --- --- do ---, Tandulwadi

 

List of Veterinary Medical Shops in the district :-

1) Rajendra Medical Stores, Parbhani

2) Kausar Medical Stores, Parbhani.

The General Medical stores at all places usualy keeps stocks of veterinary Medicne.

Earthquakes

Planning Assumptions

Earthquakes have large spatial and temporal impacts. Resource requirements are both intensive and extensive for management of earthquakes, in terms of the number of agencies involved and the nature of coordination required.

Lead Agencies

v The lead agencies involved in the management of earthquakes are revenue, police, fire, and medical services.

v Due to extensive damage to infrastructure, the Telecommunication, MSEB, MWSSB and Public Works Departments play an important role in the management of this disaster.

v As a result of earthquakes, floods and epidemics can also occur. Therefore stress is laid on measures taken to ensure coordination with health and irrigation departments.

Nature of Damages

The impact of earthquakes differs for urban and rural areas, primarily because of the nature of infrastructure, quality of housing and occupational differences. In rural areas, it is primarily the housing and physical structures (including irrigation infrastructure) which may suffer extensive damage, without necessarily destroying the crops.

In urban areas, in addition to housing and physical infrastructures, it may also disturb the service infrastructure such as water supply, sewage, telephones, electricity etc., which are essentially underground installations and hence exposed to a direct impact.

Possible Impacts

Effects on Individual

Ø Loss of Life

Ø Injuries demanding surgical needs

Ø Family disruption

Specific demands raised or required

Ø Orthopedic surgery and fractures needing treatment

Ø Individuals trapped under debris need to be located and rescued which calls for not only earth moving equipments, but the services of sniffer dogs.

Ø Expertise of fire brigade and defence services may be essential in the rescue operations.

Ø In case of separation of family members information counters play an important role.

Ø In case of family disruption resulting from death of major earner, economic rehabilitation of the family may have to be planned as a long-term strategy.

Ø Loss of life, property and livestock may require damage assessment procedures to avoid litigations and delays in gratuitous relief and compensation.

Damage caused

Ø Houses

Ø Personal Belongings

Ø Livestock

Specific demands raised or required

Ø Partially damaged houses needs technical inspection to decide the habitation worthiness and the extent of repairs required.

Ø Certain partially damaged houses may require demolition.

Ø As far as possible, reconstruction will take place on the same sites to avoid delays, secure cultural continuity and avoid costly land purchase. In extreme situations, new sites for resettlement may have to be identified when removal of rubble and debris is non-viable.

Ø Salvaging personal belongings from the debris needs clearance from technical personnel to ensure safety of persons engaged.

Ø As far as possible, family members only will be permitted to salvage their individual family belongings.

Damage to infrastructure resulting in disruption of services

Ø Buildings

Ø Dams

Ø Bridges

Ø Road Surface and Rail Lines

Ø Power Stations

Ø Water pipelines and water tanks

Ø Sewer lines

Ø Underground Cables

Specific demands raised or required

Ø Care needs to be taken to ensure that all electrical supplies to damaged area are disconnected promptly by MSEB.

Ø Underground cables need thorough inspection before power is restored.

Ø Breaches or cracks in the dam need Irrigation Department to secure the breaches or grouting the cracks.

Ø In case of damage to bridges, relief operations may require temporary bridges which can be put up with the assistance of army.

Ø Certain roads needing resurfacing will need immediate action from PWD.

Ø MWSSB in consultations with health authorities should restore existing water supply with necessary repairs. This may call for replacement of pipelines or arrangements for storage in portable PVC water tanks.

Ø In some cases, restoration of existing water supply may be time-consuming and therefore water tankers may have to be pressed into service.

Ø Identification of nearby water sources and checking water’s potability may also be required.

Ø Damage to sewer lines is to be looked into. Alternate arrangements by way of temporary latrines (technical details given on Pg. No ) may have to be constructed.

Ø Extensive damage to residential buildings resulting in disruption of telecommunication facilities requires provision/installation of public telephones (PCO) to facilitate communication.

Ø Damage to hospital, school buildings and other public facilities may disrupt the services. In such a case restoration of services through temporary arrangements is the first priority.

Ø PWD may have to take repairs or reconstruction of such public facilities on a priority basis.

Environmental Effects

Ø Alteration in river and stream flow

Ø Liquefaction

Specific demands raised or required

Ø Areas indicating signs of liquefaction should be declared out of bounds and strict vigil should be kept by police to prohibit trespassing.

Ø Foundations of the building in the area prone to liquefaction need technical assessment.

Ø Alteration in river and stream flow particularly when it covers a settlement create immediate demands for evacuation and relief till such time that the areas for new settlement identified and rehabilitation works are executed.

Economic and Social consequences

Ø Loss of livelihood

Ø Disruption of market and Loss in production

Ø Migration

Ø Disruption of social structure including breakdown of social order and organisations

Ø Law and order problem

Ø Psychological after-effects such as individual trauma and depression

Specific demands raised or required

In addition to immediate relief requirements for effective and early recovery process, checking migration

Ø restoration of production units, and employment avenues

Ø provision of individual counselling and community counselling

Ø Reconstruction of social structures and organisation of community requires participation of non-governmental organisations District administration must invite or coopt voluntary agencies to ensure this aspect.

Ø For combating depression, engage people in all possible activities related to relief and rehabilitation through a deliberate strategy of community participation.

Secondary effects

Ø Fires

Ø Rains

Ø Landslides

Specific demands raised or required

Ø Fires resulting from earthquake are essentially a result of damage to infrastructure such as power supply.

Ø Immediate service of fire brigade is essential to check further damage.

Ø Immediate discontinuation of power would restrict the possibility of occurrence to a large extent.

Ø Rains following earthquakes essentially disrupt rescue and relief operations. Rescue and relief teams therefore must prepare themselves in anticipation and get community cooperation to overcome such difficulties.

Ø Rains also have implication for storage of food, fuel for cooking (firewood or coal) and fodder for the cattle. Protective structures therefore for the storage of all relief material becomes essential. Plastic materials and water-proof containers are required.

Ø Damage to road access due to landslides needs immediate clearing and PWD has to keep itself prepared for such an eventuality.

Ø Settlements on the hill-slope prone to landslides need to be shifted to safer places.

Floods

Planning Assumptions

Ø Floods occur with warning, while flash flood occur with very little warning.

Ø Flood prone areas in India are demarcated as either blue or red lines depending on the frequency of occurrence. Blue lines are those areas where floods can occur once every five years whereas red lines are areas where floods can occur once every hundred years.

Ø The resource requirements for management of flood is extremely intensive involving large scale mobilization of resources.

Lead Agencies

Ø The lead agencies are the revenue, police, irrigation, and medical services.

Ø Extensive damage to infrastructure and public utilities is possible hence the role of supporting agencies such as MSEB, Telecommunications and PWD is crucial.

Ø The loss to crop or plantation demands involvement of Agriculture Department, ZP

Ø Loss of cattle will bring in the role for Animal Husbandry, ZP.

Ø The assistance and intervention of the EOC is essential to support the district administration in the management of these disasters.

Ø Additionally, secondary disasters such as epidemics may be caused due to floods and must be monitored by Public Health Department.

Possible Impacts

v Effects on Individual

Ø Loss of Life

Ø Injuries demanding medical attention

Ø Water-borne infection

Specific demands raised or required

Ø In most cases, orthopedic surgery, fractures, cuts and bruises need immediate attention.

Ø Cases of water-borne infection need medication.

Ø Mass immunisation, when necessary, to protect individuals from water-borne diseases.

Ø Marooned individuals, including those trapped on tree-tops and building terraces need to be located and rescued which calls for boats, or at times helicopter services.

Ø Alternatively when large sections of community are marooned instead of evacuation it may be necessary to organise dispatch of relief supplies to marooned locations. This creates a special need for transport facility.

Ø Expertise of fire brigade and defence services may be essential in the rescue operations.

Impact at family level

Ø Separated families

Ø Missing persons

Ø Family disorganisation

Specific demands raised or required

Ø In case of separation of family members information counters would play an important role.

Ø In case of family disruption resulting from death of major earner, economic rehabilitation of the family may have to be planned as a long-term strategy.

Ø Loss of life, property and livestock may require damage assessment procedures to avoid litigations and delays in gratuitous relief and compensation.

Damage caused

Ø Houses

Ø Personal Belongings

Ø Livestock

Ø Crops and plantations

Ø Land

Specific demands raised or required

Ø Partially damaged houses needs technical inspection to decide the habitation worthiness and the extent of repairs required.

Ø Certain partially damaged houses may require demolition.

Ø As far as possible, reconstruction should take place on the same sites to avoid delays, secure cultural continuity and avoid costly land purchase. In extreme situations, new sites for resettlement may have to be identified when removal of rubble and debris is non-viable.

Ø Salvaging personal belongings from the debris needs clearance from technical personnel to ensure safety of persons engaged.

Ø As far as possible, family members only should be permitted to salvage their individual family belongings.

Ø Damage to crops, plantations or agriculture land will need a long-term intervention.

Damage to infrastructure and disruption of services

Ø Buildings

Ø Godowns and storages

Ø Dams

Ø Bridges

Ø Road Surface and Rail Lines

Ø Power Stations

Ø Water pipelines and water tanks

Ø Sewer lines

Ø Underground Cables

Ø Ports and Jetties

Ø Communication Lines

Specific demands raised or required

Ø Care needs to be taken to ensure that all electrical supplies to damaged area are disconnected promptly by MSEB.

Ø Underground cables need thorough inspection before power is restored.

Ø Damage to electric poles and transmission lines needs restoration.

Ø Breaches or cracks in the dam need Irrigation Department to secure the breaches or grouting the cracks.

Ø In case of damage to bridges, relief operations may require temporary bridges which can be put up with the assistance of army.

Ø Certain roads needing resurfacing will need immediate action from PWD.

Ø Roads blocked due to uprooting of trees and electric poles may need to be cleared on a priority basis.

Ø MWSSB in consultations with health authorities should restore existing water supply with necessary repairs. This may call for replacement of pipelines or arrangements for storage in portable PVC water tanks.

Ø In some cases, restoration of existing water supply may be time-consuming and therefore water tankers may have to be pressed into service.

Ø Identification of nearby water sources and checking the potability of the same may also be required.

Ø Damage or choking of sewer lines is one of the most ticklish issue. Alternate arrangements by way of temporary latrines (technical details given on Pg. No ) may have to be constructed.

Ø Extensive damage to residential buildings resulting in disruption of telecommunication facilities requires provision of public telephones (PCO) to facilitate communication.

Ø Damage to hospital, school buildings and other public facilities may disrupt the services. In such a case restoration of services through temporary arrangements is the first priority.

Ø PWD may have to take repairs or reconstruction of such public facilities on a priority basis.

Ø Disposal of damaged foodgrains is one of the major step and needs community cooperation.

Ø Provision for distribution of cooked food or dry rations may have to be made.

Environmental Effects

Ø soil erosion

Ø silting

Ø water pollution

Ø denudation of land

Ø increase in salinity

Specific demands raised or required

Ø Silting in residential areas and buildings is one of the major problems requiring extensive community involvement.

Ø NGOs have demonstrated a tremendous capacity to mobilise community participation in desilting operations for reoccupancy of the residences and also the wells providing drinking water.

Ø Agriculture department may have to undertake soil-testing and propose appropriate measures for restoration of agriculture land.

Economic and Social consequences

Ø Loss of livelihood

Ø Disruption of market and Loss in production

Ø Migration

Ø Disruption of social structure including breakdown of social order

Ø and community organisations

Ø Law and order problem

Ø Psychological after-effects like depression, trauma etc.

Specific demands raised or required

In addition to immediate relief requirements for effective and early recovery process and checking migration

Ø restoration of production units, and employment avenues

Ø provision of individual counselling and community counselling

Ø Reconstruction of social structures and organisation of community requires a professional intervention which can best come from non-governmental organisations Voluntary agencies will have to be invited or coopted for relief activities to ensure this aspect.

Ø For combating depression, engage people in all possible activities related to relief and rehabilitation through a deliberate strategy of community participation.

Secondary effects

Ø Epidemics

Ø Landslides

Specific demands raised or required

Ø Rescue and relief teams must be alert to the possibility of outbreak of epidemics and therefore ensure standards of services with respect to storage, cooking, and handling of food materials as also disposal of waste in relief camps, medical centres and feeding centres.

Ø Water-quality monitoring mechanisms will have to be set-up to prevent outbreak of epidemics.

Ø Rains also have implication for storage of food, fuel for cooking (firewood or coal) and fodder for the cattle. Protective structures therefore for the storage of all relief material becomes essential. Plastic materials and water-proof containers are required.

Ø Damage to road access due to landslides needs immediate clearing and PWD has to keep itself prepared for such an eventuality.

Ø Settlements on the hill-slope prone to landslides need to be shifted to safer places.

Epidemics

Planning Assumptions

Ø The existing water quality monitoring and vector control programmes reduces the possibility of spread of epidemics to a considerable extent.

Ø Efficient response from pathological and testing laboratories helps in early diagnosis of the possible epidemic.

Lead Agencies

Ø The revenue and health department inlcuding the medical service is the main agency involved in disaster management during epidemics.

Ø In the case of epidemics accompanying floods the water supply and sanitation department, MWSSB and irrigation department are the support agencies

Ø Apart from these support services, assistance is also sought from the police and home guards, public works department, state transport and the media.

Possible Impacts

Effects on Individual

Ø Loss of Life

Ø Diseases needing Epidemiological Treatment

Specific demands raised or required

Ø Mass immunisation, when necessary, to protect individuals.

Ø In some cases, existing water supply may be contaminated and therefore water tankers may have to be pressed into service.

Ø Identification of nearby water sources and checking the potability of the same may also be required.

Ø Rescue and relief teams must be alert to the possibility of spread of epidemics and therefore ensure standards of services with respect to storage, cooking, and handling of food materials as also disposal of waste in relief camps, medical centres and feeding centres.

Ø Water-quality monitoring mechanisms will have to be set-up to prevent spread of epidemics.

Ø In case of vector-borne diseases, the exact vector and related control methods will have to be followed. The required materials are listed on (pg. No)

Ø Life-saving drugs including saline will be required in large quantities

Ø Disposable kits for treatment of affected people and arrangements for proper disposal of these.

Ø Personal protection kits for medical personnel and volunteers assisting in treatment of patients.

Ø Arrangements for disposal of personal belongings and other solid waste materials.

Ø Monitoring arrangements including testing facilities with the help of laboratories and hospitals.

Economic and Social consequences

Ø Migration

Ø Evacuation

Ø Law and order problem

Ø Psychological after-effects especially isolation

Specific demands raised or required

In addition to immediate medical relief requirements for effective and early recovery process and checking migration

Ø restoration of potable water supply

Ø provision of

Þ quarantine of infected cases at family and hospital level

Þ programme of immunisation

Þ water quality monitoring

Þ pathological testing laboratories

Þ individual counselling

Þ family counselling

Ø Involvement of NGOs in mobilising community efforts for the control of epidemics by ensuring standards of environmental sanitation, disposal of waste and personal hygiene.

Road Accidents

Planning Assumptions

Ø The major road accidents are highly localised.

Ø The response machinery that is to be activated is at a much more local level

Ø In case of road accidents involving toxic and highly inflammable materials, there is need for temporary evacuation.

Lead Agencies

Ø The lead agencies are revenue, police and the regional transport office.

Ø In major accidents involving loss of life and injuries to a large number of people, services of agencies such as fire services, health department will be needed

Ø In the case of a vehicle plunge in the river, services of divers for rescue operations are required.

Possible Impacts

Effects on Individuals

Ø Loss of Life

Ø Trauma Care

Ø Burns

Ø Injuries demanding surgical treatment

Ø Poisoning or exposure to toxic material

Specific demands raised or required

Ø In most cases, orthopedic surgery and fractures need immediate attention.

Ø Individuals trapped in the vehicles need to be rescued which at times calls for metal cutting devices.

Ø Expertise of fire brigade and defence services may be essential when the accident involves vehicles carrying hazardous chemicals, toxic materials or explosives.

Ø Divers may be required if the accident involves a vehicle falling off a bridge into water.

Ø The police may require to cordon off the area.

Ø Chemical accidents may generate a demand for treatment for burns and exposure to poisonous substances which may mean a specialised service not generally available along the highways.

Ø Nature of injuries may demand immediate transfer of injured to centres offering trauma care.

Ø Loss of life, property and goods may require damage assessment procedures to avoid litigations and delays in gratuitous relief and compensation including insurance.

Damage caused

Ø Vehicles

Ø Goods

Specific demands raised or required

Ø Salvaging the goods from the accident site needs clearance from technical personnel to ensure safety of persons engaged.

Environmental Effects

Ø Air pollution if vehicle carrying hazardous chemicals are involved

Disruption of services

Ø Road network

Ø Traffic

Specific demands raised or required

Ø The spills from vehicles carrying hazardous materials may require stoppage of traffic and cleaning of road surface. Various materials are recommended depending on the nature of spill. Also, specialised agencies may have to be called for undertaking spill cleaning operations.

Ø Diversion of traffic resulting from such accidents may require traffic control to give information at various entry points located also far away (which need quick identification) from the site of accident so as to avoid inconvenience to the travellers.

Ø Special cranes may be required for clearing the accident site.

Economic and Social consequences

Ø Law and order problem

Specific demands raised or required

Ø Security of goods and materials in the vehicles involved in the accident needs protection. The details of goods need to be officially recorded.

Secondary Effects

Ø Fires

Ø Gas leak affecting settlements near the accident site

Specific demands raised or required

Ø It may be necessary to inform the settlements around to take necessary precautionary measures, if the accident involves leakage of toxic gases.

Ø It may be advisable to send a team of medical personnel from poison centres to visit the settlements around the accident site when toxic leak is reported.

Fires

Lead Agencies

Ø The main agencies involved in disaster management are the revenue department, local fire service (municipality or municipal corporation), medical services (hospitals) and police (local police station),

Ø In the event of a major fire, the local fire service would need to co-ordinate with the MSEB and the water supply department for assistance in containment of the fire.

Ø Major evacuation may call for support from DCR.

Possible Impacts

Effects on Individuals

Ø Burns

Ø Injuries demanding surgical treatment

Ø Loss of Life

Specific demands raised or required

Ø Serious burn cases may need immediate transport for admission to burn wards in the hospital

Ø In many cases, panic behaviour may lead to injuries requiring treatment for orthopedic surgery and fractures.

Ø Expertise of fire brigade may be essential in the rescue operations and control of fire particularly when population density is very high.

Ø In case of separation of family members information counters would play an important role. (This is normally observed in case of fires in large slums)

Ø In case of family disruption resulting from death of major earner, economic rehabilitation of the family may have to be planned as a long-term strategy.

Ø Loss of life, property and livestock may require damage assessment procedures to avoid litigations and delays in gratuitous relief and compensation.

Damage caused

Ø House

Ø Personal Belongings

Specific demands raised or required

Ø Partially damaged houses needs technical inspection to decide the habitation worthiness and the extent of repairs required.

Ø Certain partially damaged houses may require demolition.

Ø Transit arrangements may have to be identified when the structure needs reconstruction.

Ø Salvaging personal belongings from the debris needs clearance from technical personnel to ensure safety of persons engaged.

Ø As far as possible, family members only should be permitted to salvage their individual family belongings.

Damage to infrastructure and disruption of services

Ø Buildings

Ø Overhead lines

Ø Communication Lines

Specific demands raised or required

Ø Care needs to be taken to ensure that all electrical supplies to damaged area are disconnected promptly by MSEB officials in the area.

Ø Underground cables need thorough inspection before power is restored.

Ø Extensive damage to residential buildings resulting in disruption of telecommunication facilities requires provision of public telephones (PCO) to facilitate communication.

Ø Damage to hospital, school buildings and other public facilities may disrupt the services. In such a case restoration of services through temporary arrangements is the first priority.

Ø PWD may have to take repairs or reconstruction of such public facilities on a priority basis.

Ø Some fires may demand traffic control measures including identification of alternate routes and diversion of traffic.

Ø In congested areas controlling curious onlookers may block movement of rescue and fire workers. The police will need to cordon off the area for smooth operations.

Economic consequences

Ø Loss of livelihood

Ø disruption of market

Ø loss in production

Specific demands raised or required

In addition to immediate relief requirements for effective and early recovery process,

Ø restoration of markets, production units, employment avenues

Ø Provision of damage assessment

Industrial and Chemical Accidents

Planning Assumptions

Ø Off-site industrial accidents are in the form of fires, explosions and toxic gas leaks.

Ø The responsibility of declaring an industrial accident as off-site rests with the management of the industrial unit where the accident has occurred.

Ø The most crucial decision in off-site industrial accident management is the recognition / identification of the stage at which the responsibility is handed over from the management to the public authorities.

Ø The public authority will be the District Collector when the disaster is likely to impact a larger area.

Lead Agencies

The main participating agencies in the management of off-site industrial disasters are :

Ø revenue

Ø police, fire, medical services

Ø civil defence agencies

Ø public works department

Ø Industry

Ø MARG

Ø Public Health and regulatory environmental agencies.

Ø To enable effective immediate response, specialists are required to

¨ provide fast, reliable information on the properties of the substance released,

¨ its potential hazard,

¨ protective equipment required,

¨ containment and control measures to be taken and

¨ advice on the decontamination and emergency termination activities required.

Possible Impacts

Effects on Individual

Ø Loss of Life

Ø Burns

Ø Injuries demanding Surgical treatment

Ø Exposure to toxic material

Specific demands raised or required

Ø In most cases, orthopedic surgery and fractures need immediate attention.

Ø Expertise of fire brigade, mutual aid and response groups (MARG), may be essential.

Ø The police may require to cordon off the area.

Ø Chemical accidents may generate a demand for treatment for burns and exposure to poisonous substances which may mean a specialised service not generally available with medical practitioners.

Ø Nature of injuries may demand immediate transfer of injured to poison centres.

Ø Loss of life, property and goods may require damage assessment procedures to avoid litigations and delays in gratuitous relief and compensation including insurance.

Ø Areas indicating spread of toxic gases should be declared out of bounds and strict vigil should be kept by police to prohibit trespassing.

Ø Alteration in wind direction when it covers a settlement create immediate demands for evacuation and relief till such time that an all-clear signal is given.

Environmental Effects

Ø water pollution

Ø air pollution

Ø effect on vegetation

Specific demands raised or required

Ø On a long-term basis monitoring of air, water and soil quality will have to be carried out.

Disruption of services

Ø Road network

Ø Electricity

Ø Water supply

Economic and Social consequences

Ø Loss of livelihood

Ø Disruption of market

Ø Damage to food stocks

Ø Loss in production

Ø Migration

Ø Law and order problem

Ø Social and Psychological effects

Specific demands raised or required

In addition to immediate relief requirements for effective and early recovery process and checking migration

Ø restoration of production units, employment avenues

Ø provision of individual counselling and community counselling

Ø For combating depression, engage people in all possible activities related to relief and rehabilitation through a deliberate strategy of community participation.

Cyclones

Planning Assumptions

Ø Cyclones can be predicted sufficiently in advance but its impact location over land is uncertain.

Ø The resource requirements for management of cyclone impact is extremely intensive involving large scale mobilization of resources.

Lead Agencies

Ø The lead agencies are the Fire, Police and Health departments.

Ø Extensive damage to infrastructure and public utilities is possible hence the role of supporting agencies such as MSEB, Telecommunications and PWD is crucial.

Ø The loss to crop or plantation demands involvement of Agriculture Department

Ø Loss of cattle will bring in the role for Animal Husbandry.

Ø The assistance and intervention of the EOC is essential to support the district administration in the management of these disasters.

Ø Additionally, secondary disasters such as epidemics may be caused due to floods resulting from cyclones and must be monitored by Public Health Department.

Possible Impacts

Effects on Individual

Ø Loss of Life

Ø Injuries demanding surgical needs

Ø Family disorganisation

Specific demands raised or required

Ø In most cases, orthopedic surgery, fractures, cuts and bruises need immediate attention.

Ø Mass immunisation is necessary to protect individuals from water-borne diseases.

Ø Marooned individuals, including those trapped on tree-tops and building terraces (in case of tidal wave) need to be located and rescued which calls for boats, or at times helicopter services.

Ø Alternatively when large sections of community are marooned instead of evacuation it may be necessary to organise dispatch of relief supplies to marooned locations. This creates a special need for transport facility.

Ø Expertise of fire brigade and defence services (Navy, Coast Guards) may be essential in the rescue operations.

Damage caused

[Cyclones may be accompanied by heavy rains, or at times tidal waves].

Ø Houses

Ø Personal Belongings

Ø Livestock

Ø Crops and Plantations

Ø Forests

Specific demands raised or required

Ø Partially damaged houses needs technical inspection to decide the habitation worthiness and the extent of repairs required.

Ø Certain partially damaged houses may require demolition.

Ø New sites for resettlement may have to be identified when removal of rubble and debris is non-viable.

Ø Salvaging personal belongings from the debris needs clearance from technical personnel to ensure safety of persons engaged.

Ø As far as possible, family members only should be permitted to salvage their individual family belongings.

Damage to infrastructure and disruption in services

Ø Buildings

Ø Godowns and storages

Ø Dams

Ø Bridges

Ø Road Surface and Rail Lines

Ø Power Stations and Power Lines

Ø Water Tanks

Ø Ports and Jetties

Ø Communication Lines

Ø Railway Signals

Specific demands raised or required

Ø Care needs to be taken to ensure that all electrical supplies to damaged area are disconnected promptly by MSEB.

Ø Overhead lines need thorough inspection before power is restored.

Ø Breaches or cracks in the dam need Irrigation Department to secure the breaches or grouting the cracks.

Ø In case of damage to bridges, relief operations may require temporary bridges which can be put up with the assistance of army.

Ø Certain roads needing resurfacing will need immediate action from PWD.

Ø MWSSB in consultations with health authorities should restore existing water supply with necessary repairs. This may call for replacement of pipelines or arrangements for storage in portable PVC water tanks.

Ø In some cases, restoration of existing water supply may be time-consuming and therefore water tankers may have to be pressed into service.

Ø Identification of nearby water sources and checking the potability of the same may also be required.

Ø Choking of sewer lines is one of the most ticklish issue. Immediate arrangements for clearing the sewer lines is necessary.

Ø Piped gas supply should be immediately terminated in the affected area to avoid secondary consequences. If necessary, and feasible gas cylinders should be supplied till the gas line is checked thoroughly and restored.

Ø Extensive damage to residential buildings resulting in disruption of telecommunication facilities requires provision of public telephones (PCO) to facilitate communication.

Ø Damage to hospital, school buildings and other public facilities may disrupt the services.

Ø In such a case restoration of services through temporary arrangements is the first

Ø priority.

Ø PWD may have to take repairs or reconstruction of such public facilities on a priority basis.

Ø Disposal of damaged foodgrains is one of the major step and needs community cooperation.

Ø Provision for distribution of cooked food or dry rations may have to be made.

Ø Rains also have implication for storage of food, fuel for cooking (firewood or coal) and fodder for the cattle. Protective structures therefore for the storage of all relief material becomes essential. Plastic materials and water-proof containers are required.

Environmental Effects

Ø soil erosion

Ø silting

Ø water pollution

Ø increase in salinity

Specific demands raised or required

Ø Silting in residential areas and buildings is one of the major problems requiring extensive community involvement.

Ø NGOs have demonstrated a tremendous capacity to mobilise community participation in desalting operations for reoccupancy of the residences and also the wells providing drinking water.

Ø Agriculture department may have to undertake soil-testing and propose appropriate measures for restoration of agriculture land.

Economic and Social consequences

Ø Loss of livelihood

Ø Disruption of market and Loss in production

Ø Disruption of social structure including breakdown of social order

Ø and community organisations

Ø Migration

Ø Law and order problem

Ø Psychological after-effects

Specific demands raised or required

Ø In addition to immediate relief requirements, for effective and early recovery process and checking migration

Ø restoration of production units and employment avenues

Ø provision of individual counselling and community counselling

Ø Reconstruction of social structures and organisation of community requires a professional intervention which can best come from non-governmental organisations Voluntary agencies will have to be invited or coopted for relief activities to ensure this aspect.

Ø For combating depression, engage people in all possible activities related to relief and rehabilitation through a deliberate strategy of community participation.

Secondary effects

Ø Epidemics

Ø Landslides

Specific demands raised or required

Ø Rescue and relief teams must be alert to the possibility of outbreak of epidemics and therefore ensure standards of services with respect to storage, cooking, and handling of food materials as also disposal of waste in relief camps, medical centres and feeding centres.

Ø Water-quality monitoring mechanisms will have to be set-up to prevent outbreak of epidemics.

Ø Damage to road access due to landslides needs immediate clearing and PWD has to keep itself prepared for such an eventuality.

Ø Settlements on the hill-slope prone to landslides need to be shifted to safer places.

Non-governmental Organisations (NGOs) and Voluntary Agencies

The non-governmental organisations and voluntary agencies play an important role in disaster management and provide a strong band of committed volunteers with experience in managing the disasters. Their strength lies in the choice of their manpower, the informality in operations and flexibility in procedures. These organisations enjoy a fair degree of autonomy and hence can respond to changing needs immediately.

The NGOs will be assigned specific locations and roles by the District Collector to undertake relief work within the overall institutional framework. The list of NGOs in the district with their specific nature of work, and specific roles of NGOs during disaster management is given in the following sections. These NGOs would work in close co-ordination with the district administration and maintain the standards of services, information exchange and reporting requirements so as to enable the Collector to have a total picture of resource availability, disbursements and requirements. As and where possible, NGOs may also be able to improve the quality of delivery of welfare services in the camps organised and manned by administration.

List of NGOs and specific assistance available from them

NGOs to be involved in specific activities during disaster management operations

List of Non-Government Organizations useful for Medical Aid.

Sr. No.
Name of Society
Detail Address
1 Society For Education in Values and Action
Charthana Tq. Jintur
Dist. Parbhani.
2 Prabhat Education Society Advocate Colony, Parbhani
3 Gram Vikas Sanstha Post. Jintur Tq. Jintur
Dist. Parbhani
4 Deodasi Mahila Mandal Marathwada Plot, Parbhani
5 Priyadarshni Sevabhavi Sanstha
Post. Kalamnuri Tq. Kalamnuri
Dist. Parbhani.
6 Sharda Mahila Mandal, Zari Shri Manikrao Zarikar (Adv.)
Narayan Chal, Parbhani.
7 Barashiv Hanuman Khishak
Prasarak Mandal
Post. Basmath Tq. Basmath
Dist. Parbhani.
8 Ramabai Ambedkar Khishan
Prasarak Mandal
I.T.I. Corner, Jintur Road,
Parbhani.
9 Sant Dnynoba Mauli
Gram Vikas Santha
Post. Hatta Tq. Basmath
Dist. Parbhani
10 Sant Bhagwan Baba
Sevabhavi Sanstha
Post. Gangakhed Dist. Parbhani
11 Maher Mahila Mandal Post. Kosadi Tq. Jintur
Dist. Parbhani.
12 Sawpnabhumi Prakalp
Kerwadi
Post. Kerwadi Tq. Gangakhed
13 New Bhagirathi Sevabhavi
Sanstha
Sow. Pratibha Borikar
Krishi Sarthi Colony
Vidyapith Gate, Parbhani.
14 Jankallyan Sevabhavi Sanstha Basmath Nager, Dist. Parbhani
15 Acharya Narendra Khishan
Samajik Aarthik Vikas
Sanshodhan Prakalp & Bharat
Pad Yatri Kendra
Joytibasdan Rukhmini Nager
Basmath Road, Parbhani.
16 Lokathimanav Vikas Sanstha Post. Hadgaon Tq. Jintur
Dist. Parbhani.
17 Sangnak Mahila Mandal I.T.I. Road, Parbhani
18 Gramine Samajik Vikas
Santha
Pimbaldari Tq. Gangakhed
Dist. Parbhani.
19 Samaj Rachna Mahila
Mandal, Parbhani.
Post. Ambedkar Nager,
Parbhani.
20 Ekta Sahitik Kala and
Khishan Mandal
Post. Digras wani Tq. Hingoli
Trimurti Nager, Parbhani.
21 Shivneri Sevabhavi Santha Maligally, Parbhani.

 

Encouraging Community Preparedness

Disasters may result in cutting off essential services and in spite of administrative preparedness it may not be possible for the administration to reach out immediately.

Mitigation efforts and preparation of the disaster management action plan for local areas are essential elements and pre-requisites. Preparedness to a large extent would reduce the impact and the damage. Training and simulation exercises for enhancing the community’s preparedness and response capability will simultaneously strengthen and enhance the capacity of the administration to undertake necessary preparedness or evacuation measures. The district administration is encouraging and supporting initiatives towards community preparedness measures including formation of Community Emergency Response Teams (CERTs).

On the basis of discussions, apart from the NGOs mentioned earlier, the following Private Sector units, Mahila Mandals and CBOs have been identified as resource groups for involvement in community preparedness measures. They will all undergo training for the same. These Private Sector units, Mahila Mandals, CBOs, NGOs would adopt a conscious effort towards community level preparedness measures. They would also promote the formation of CERTs.

As a part of general preparedness at community level, the families in the community would be made conscious about the type of hazard that the household situation presents and the threats from outside. Also, communities would be encouraged to undertake exercises in risk and vulnerability analysis and preparation of community response plan to possible disasters. Thus local local disaster management action plans for hot-spot areas in the context of specific vulnerability would be developed. For areas with high concentration of industries MARGs have been set-up, whereas for areas prone to other types of disasters Community Emergency Response Teams (CERTs) are being set-up. Special efforts have also been taken to involve Sugar Co-operatives towards Community Preparedness Measures.

Private Sector Units in Parbhani

Cooperatives

Co-Operative Milk Society :-

1) Sahakari Dhugth Sangh

Parbhani

List of CBOs (Mahila Mandals and Yuvak Mandals) who will work towards community preparedness measures

List of Mahila Mandals useful in Diasters.

Sr. No.
Facility/
Resource
Type of Help
Location
Name of the
Mahila Mandals
Person Incharge
Name , Desegnation,
Phone/Fax
1 I) Manpower
II) Volenteers Nager,
III) Relief Activities
(Cooked Food,
Water, Gratur-
tous reilef etc.)
Dr.Ambedkar

Parbhani
Nalanda Mahila
Sanskar Kendra
Parbhani
Mrs. Shantabai
Jogdand (Presedent)
20265
2 --- do --- Dargha Road,
Parbhani
Anjuman – A Fouzia
Parbhani
Mrs. Fauzia Begum
(Presedent ), 21312
3 --- do --- Main Road,
Purna
Adiwasi Mahila
Vikas Sanstha,
Purna
Mrs. Parwati
Suryawanshi
(Presedent )
4 --- do --- Bhosa
Tq. Pathri
Adarsh Mahila
Mandal, Bhosa
Mrs. Pande
(Presedent )
5 --- do --- Sailu Jijamata Mahila
Audyogic Utpadak
Sanstha, Sailu
Mrs. Lata Arole
(Presedent )
6 --- do --- Bori
Tq. Jintur
Adarsha Mahila
Mandal Bori
Mrs. Surekha
Choudhari
(Presedent ), 42344
7 --- do --- Basmat Kanchan Mahila
Sevabhavi Sanstha
Basmat
Mrs. Indulata
Jaiswal , (Presedent )
24552, 24178



List of othe mahila and Yuwak Mandals

Sr.No.

         Name  & Address  of  Yuvak  Mandals  

President/Secertery

   1

Sahebrao  Deshmukh  Yuvak  Kala , Krida  &  Vyam Prasarak Mandal  Itlapur  Tq. Parbhani

D.P.Deshmukh

   2

Annapurna  Sarwangin  Vikas  Mandal 

Bhgya  Nager, Parbhani.

Mrs. Swami

   3

Samaj  Rachna  Yuvak  Mahila  Mandal

Karegaon Road, Parbhani

         ---

   4

Lokseva  Mahila  Vikas  Mandal

Near  Civil  Hospital  Parbhani.

Mrs. Indumati Mule

   5

Sharda Mahila  Mandal  

Vikas  Nager, Parbhani

Mrs. Padminibai Sanghai

   6

Samarth  Krida  &  Yuvak Mandal

Daithna  Tq. Parbhani.

           ---

   7

Sahyog Krida Yuvak Mandal,

Parbhani

            ---

    8

Prabhavati  Sahitya  Kala  &  Vikas  Mandal

Prabhavati  Nager, Parbhani

Shri Nitin  Phutane

    9

Umed  Mhaila Sevabhavi  Santha 

Prabhavati  Nager, Parbhani

Mrs. Priya Phutane

  10

Lavankush  Vyamshala  & Yuvak  Krida  Mandal

Parbhani

              ---

  11

Panchshil  Magasvargiya  Mahila Mandal,

Sadegaon  Tq. Parbhani.

Mrs. Anusayabai

Betke

  12

Sarvadharma  Sambhav  Vikas  Mandal

Ashok Nager, Parbhani

Mrs. Ahilyabai

Ambhure

   13

Sindhant Yuvak  Krida & Vyam Mandal,

Parbhani

Shri  R.B. Kadam

   14

Shll-Mahila Mandal

Ramabai Ambedkar Nager, Parbhani.

Mrs. Gayabai Waghmare

   15

Adarash  Mahila Mandal,

Trimurti Nager, Parbhani

Mrs. Vimal Pande

   16

Gramin Smajseva  Mahila Vikas Mandal Parbhani

Mrs. S.K. Alne

   17

Narsinh  Yuvak Sevabhavi Sanstha

Dhasadi Tq. Parbhani

             ---

   18

Santh  Bhagwan Baba Yuvak & Sports Mandal

Zola  Tq. Gangakhed 

Shri  U.S. Palwade

   19

Gramvikas  Yuvak  Mandal,

Rumna  Tq. Gangakhed

Shri Hanumant Marotrao

  20

Shri  Chatrapati  Sambaji  Vyam  Shalla

Muli  Tq. Gangakhed

 Shri  B.M. Pawar      

 

  21

Narsinvah  Vyam Shalla  & Sanskrutik Mandal,

Pimpri  Tq. Gangakhed.

Shri Balasaheb  Bhise

  22

Gramvikas  Mahila  Mandal,

Dhusalgaon Tq. Gangakhed

Shri  Rameshwar Pawar

   23

Rastrasant  Paslegaonkar  Maharaj  Vyam Shalla & Krida Mandal Sonpeth  Tq. Gangakhed

Shri  Kure  Guruji

   24

ShriRam Vyam Shalla  and Sanskurtik Mandal,

Vandan  Tq. Gangakhed

          ---

   25

Vishvabharti  Natya  Mandal,

Dr. Ambedkar Nager, Purna

Shri S.M. Gaikwad

   26

Gramvikas  Samajik Yuvak  Sevabhavi Sanstha,

Dagadwadi  Tq. Purna

            ---

   27

JaiMalhar  Krida  & Sanskritik Mandal

Dagadwadi  Tq. Purna

Shri  Manik Washmare

   28

Shri Gramvikas  Samajik  Arthik, Sanskritik Yuyak Sevabhavi Sanstha  Kharbada Tq. Purna.

Shri Shriram Malge

   29

Pawansoot  Hanuman  Yuvak  Krida Mandal

Vajur Tq. Purna

Shri Rameshwar Pawar

   30

Pragati Prathisthan Purna

               ---

   31

Chatrapati Shivaji Maharaj Krida Mandal & Yuvak Mandal  &  Vyam Shalla,  Deulgaon (Gat)  Tq. Sailu

               ---

   32

Ekta  Yuvak Kallyan  &  Sanskritik Mandal,

Digras  Tq. Sailu

Shri Uddav Kundlik

Paul

    33

Smarth  Krida  & Yuvak Kallyan Mandal,

Peth Pimpalgaon Tq. Palam

                ---

    34

Shiv Chatrapati Yuvak  Mandal,

Dhonara K. Tq. Palam

Shri Manikrao Kute

    35

Santh Janabai  Mahila Mandal

Dhanora (K.) Tq. Palam

Smt. Bhagirathi Balasaheb

    36

Ramlilla Mahila & Balvikas Madal

Kervadi Tq. Palam

                ---   

    37

Vishal  Sevabhavi Sanstha

Sategaon Tq. Palam

Shri Sakhram Bhujbal

    38

Rastriya  Sahitik Kala  &  Shikshan  Prasarak Mandal

Digras Vani  Tq. Hingoli

Shri Khandare

    39

Rajiv  Yuvak Mandal,

Hingne Tq. Hingoli

                 ---

    40

Giteshwar Gramvikas Yuvak Mandal

Pimpri Tq. Jintur

                  ---

     41

Gitanjali Mahila Sanstha Mandal

Pimpri  Tq. Jintur

Smt. Latabai Gite

     42

Venkatesh Mahila  Mandal

Kavi Tq. Jintur

Smt. Laxmibai Uttamrao Jat

     43

Sangram Krida Yuvak Kallyan and Sanskritk Mandal Jamkhurth  Tq. Jintur

Shri Bhaskarrao Sahebrao Pimpalkar

     44

Avishkar Sahitya Kala & Sports Sanstha,

Jintur

Shri R.V. Kulkarni

     45

Kranti Mahila  Mandal

Jam (Kh) Tq. Jintur

Smt. Shobha Pimpalkar

    46

Ramrao Patil Yourak Krida Mandal                                  

Pachegaon Tq. Jintur

            ---

    47

Chatrapati Shivaji Vyam Shalla

Karanji  Tq. Jinur

             ---

    48

Navbharat Yuvak Mandal,

Satephal Tq. Basmath

Shri P.R. Borgad

    49

Adarsh Navyuvak Mitra Mandal

C/o Jain Medical Basmath

Shri S.S. Jogad

    50

Santh Dnyaneshwar Yuvak Mandal,

Kajara  Tq. Aundha

Shri P.G. Kallyankar

    51

Rajiv  Gramvikas Prathisthan

Kanjara  Tq. Aundha

Shri.N.G.Kallyankar

    52

Nagnath Gram Vikas  Mahila Mandal

Kanjara  Tq. Aundha

Smt. Sunanda Kalyankar

    53

Jai-Maharashtra Yuvak Krida Mandal

Purjal Tq. Aundha

Shri Narayan Chopde

    54

Majulabai Mahila Vikas Mandal

Jawla (Bk) Tq. Sengaon

 Smt. Jijabai Shinde 


Mutual Aid and Resource Groups (MARGs)

There are only 5 hazardous industries in the district and located in Parbhani MIDC.There is need for setting up Mutual Aid and Response Groups wherever human settlements are located close to the MIDC.

The objective of setting up MARGs in these areas are

· Make the industrial zone self-sufficient

· Encourage pooling of resources to tackle industrial accidents

· Manage both on-site and off-site industrial accidents

· Provide for a degree of expertise in managing disasters

· Reduce the response time for managing disasters

· To integrate the on-site plan of industries with an off-site plan.

· Assist the district administration in managing disasters

Guidelines for the formation of MARGs are given in Annexure I.


Community Emergency Response Teams (CERTs)

In most disasters, community members are the first to respond before any outside assistance can reach the disaster site. Therefore in certain disaster prone areas a group of young volunteers or Community Emergency Response Teams are being formed and trained to undertake essential tasks which would reduce loss of life and property and at the same time build confidence in self-management. Essentially CERTs would contribute in the following areas:

1. Organising training and preparedness exercises at the community level

2. Ensuring family preparedness on the receipt of warning

3. Ensuring communication links both within the community and with administration

4. Controlling rumours and panic behaviour and undertaking confidence building activities

5. Mobilising youth and able-bodied persons from the community to provide volunteers support, wherever required

6. Organising local work teams for immediate rescue, and relief e.g. cooked food, first aid, assistance in law and order

7. Assisting the handicapped who need special help

8. Facilitating movement of relief teams during evacuation and relief and ensuring appropriate tagging as and when necessary

9. Guarding major installations and evacuated properties till the administration takes over.

These CERTs are expected to support the efforts of the Gram Panchayat and Tahsildar.

Villages where CERTs can be formed

Parbhani district has a recurrent problem of floods. There are many flood prone villages along the major rivers and in almost all the tahsils – the list is given in Section III. Such “Community Emergency Response Teams” need to be formed in these flood prone villages.

Areas of Community Participation

Administration and NGOs at the disaster site should ensure maximum community participation in all stages of operation in order to maintain community morale and confidence, maximise the use of local resources, reduce costs of operation and promote a faster recovery. It is important to note that the so-called “victims” are not all that helpless and offer a tremendous manpower resource and ingenuity to overcome the crises. Disaster management situations offers a wide range of choice and demands a immediate decision making. The participation of communities and their representatives would reduce the pressures on administration with regard to the choice and uncertainties of community’s response to the decision-making process.

Based on local dynamics, ethos and the experience of the Latur earthquake, an appropriate strategy to ensure community support has been evolved. Such efforts to enlist community support and participation have gone a long way in reassuring the community about the administration’s intent and seriousness about managing the disaster.

Efforts to enlist community participation is being ensured by

identifying situational, opinion and position leaders in the community and voicing administration’s confidence in their capabilities to undertake the tasks.

Consultations and dialogues expressly indicating the need for assistance would encourage the community and its leaders to come forward.

Regular feedback meetings and an open book approach to demonstrate transparency.

Involving community in decision making at local levels

The major areas of community participation are being identified and include the following :

During Evacuation

For appropriate security and law and order evacuation would be undertaken with assistance from community leaders and community based organisations (CBOs).

The entire family would evacuate together as a unit. However, to avoid stampede and confusion and in cases of inadequate transport or limited time, emergency evacuation would be undertaken in the following order :

· seriously injured and sick

· children, women and handicapped

· Old

· Able-bodied

For emergency evacuations , the families would be encouraged to take along water, food, clothing and emergency supplies to last at least three days.

In addition, the families would be encouraged to assemble the following kit.

· Adeqaute supply of water in closed, unbreakable containers.

· Adequate supply of non-perishable packaged food and dry rations

· A change of clothing and rain gear.

· Blankets and bedsheets, towels

· Buckets, Plates and mugs made of plastic

· Soap, toothbrushes, toothpaste

· A battery-powered radio, torch, lantern, matches

· Cash and jewellery

· Personal medicines

· A list of important family documents including ration card, passport, bank passbook address/telephone book (of relatives), certificates, driving licence, property documents, insurance documents etc.

· Special items including foods, for infants, elderly or disabled family members.

People would be asked to shut off electricity and water at main switches and valves before leaving.

People would be asked to listen to a battery-powered radio and follow local instructions.

In other cases, people would be advised to follow these steps:

· Wear protective clothing.

· Secure their homes. Close and lock doors and windows.

· Turn off the main water valve and electricity

· Leave early enough to avoid being trapped.

· Follow recommended evacuation routes. Not to take shortcuts. They may be blocked.

· Not to move into flooded areas.

· Stay away from downed power lines.

· Animals may not be allowed in public shelters. With respect to livestock, community would be instructed to set the livestock free before evacuating in order to avoid extensive loss of livestock. If possible, the community may be advised to carry the livestock along if the evacuation does not involve transportation by vehicles.

During the Disaster

Community leaders would be responsible for ensuring the following community behaviour :

· People stay calm and panic behaviour is not encouraged. Regulate helter-skelter running or crowding of people.

· Encourage people to stay at a secured place and protect themselves from injuries.

· People do not enter damaged buildings or structures or even their own houses

· People do not touch electric poles, utility wires/cables

· People do not use telephones except in life-threatening situations

· Preparedness of community for recurrence of the disaster, increase in severity, or consequential emergencies

· Check for injuries. Do not attempt to move seriously injured persons unless they are in immediate danger of death or further injury.

· Undertake first-aid activities as per the guidelines given in preparedness and mitigation document of DDMAP

· Visually inspect utility lines and appliances for damage.

· If water pipes are damaged, shut off the water supply at the main valve.

· People stay away from damaged areas, unless their assistance has been specifically requested by police, fire or relief organizations.

· Mobilise people to put out small fires and people inside are made to evacuate.

· People do not throw away any damaged goods until an official inventory has been taken.

· Help police, if requested, to maintain law and order and watch the evacuated property during the disaster

During Relief and Rehabilitation

Immediately after the disaster, the members of the community may look depressed and helpless, but very soon gets euphoric when they find that after all everything is not lost. Participation of community at this stage helps in early recovery and promotes mental health. It is necessary to see that member of the community are continuously engaged in some sort of helping activity to draw them out of their depression.

Relief authorities at the site would therefore:

· Encourage self-help in every activity of their day-to-day living.

· Encourage assistance for location and identification of dead, disposal of dead bodies, disposal of carcasses and disposal of damaged food stocks

· Encourage contribution of labour (loading, unloading, distribution, temporary constructions, salvage and restoration of water supplies, Food distribution, relief camps, cattle camps etc.)

· Enlist assistance for updating records of damages and losses.

· Enlist assistance in maintenance of law and order

· Enlist assistance in maintaining sanitation standards and disposal of waste

· Promote cultural and recreational activities in order to protect the mental health and sustain the ethical and moral values.

Encouraging Family Level Preparedness

In order to assist the families to prepare themselves, community education programme will be undertaken to acquaint members of the community with the nature of each disaster, the type of damage that can occur, the demands it would generate both at family and community level and the manner in which it will be responded to. Even with the best of planning, it is difficult to assess the exact impact of the disaster and the response time. Under the circumstances then, families have to prepare themselves for a prolonged period before the administration can reach them. Although collective efforts of the community can reduce the hardship to some extent a large part of the burden would be on the family itself. Hence families would be encouraged to check for the in-house hazards as also use the given emergency checklist and prepare itself accordingly.

Checking for in-house hazards

· Encourage people to inspect their houses once every year to find and correct potential hazards such as any household items that can move, fall, break, or cause a fire.

· Check for electrical hazards.

¨ Undertake repairs or replacement of hazardous cables, plugs, connections.

¨ Remove unwanted plug points or unused cables.

· Check for combustible materials in the household

¨ Appropriateness of storage place (light, ventilation, heat and reach of children)

¨ Appropriateness of containers of flammable liquids such as kerosone/diesel (quality of material, quantity of material, covers, leakages)

¨ Precautions undertaken for managing the spills

· Check for fire hazards.

¨ Separation of household goods from inflammable materials

¨ Separation of fuel from combustible materials

¨ Cleaning of valves, pressure stoves and supply points

Emergency Planning and Checklists

Families need to prepare themselves for any kind of disaster. This would require specific information about emergency water and food and a recommended checklist of emergency supplies which will enable the family to sustain itself till adequate facilities for relief are organised.

Emergency checklist:

· Find out which disasters could occur in the area.

· Ask how to prepare for each disaster.

· Know the members of the CERT

· Ask how warnings are given in an emergency.

· Learn about the community's evacuation routes.

· Learn about designated shelters

· Ask about special assistance for elderly or disabled persons.

· Learn about emergency plans at the workplace.

· Learn about emergency plans for the children’s school or day-care center.

Create an emergency plan:

· Meet with household members. Discuss with children the dangers of fire, severe weather, earthquakes and other emergencies.

· Discuss how to respond to each disaster that could occur.

· Talk to children about the likely disasters

· It is easier for children to understand what is happening during a disaster if they already know what can take place. Point out that some of the disasters are indeed natural events and although they are dangerous, they do not have to be life-threatening if adequate precautions are taken. Try not to alarm the children in discussing possible disasters.

· Teach children about the safety precautions for each disaster.

· Learn how to turn off the water and electricity at main switches.

· Create a network of relatives, friends or co-workers to assist the disabled in an emergency.

· Provide for medical alert tags or bracelets to identify the handicapped person

Disaster supplies kit

· For emergency evacuations , the families should be encouraged to take along adequate supply of water, food, clothing and emergency supplies.

· The families should be encouraged to assemble the disaster supplies kit as described earlier.

Evacuation Preparedness

When community evacuations become necessary, local officials would provide information to the public through the media. Government agencies, and other disaster relief organisations would provide emergency shelter and supplies.

The amount of time the families have to evacuate will depend on the disaster. If the event can be monitored, like a cyclone, families could have a day or two to get ready. But many disasters offer no time for people to gather even the most basic necessities. This is why evacuation plan is necessary.

The checklist for emergency planning given above would be useful for evacuation planning as well. Additionally, families should also get their disaster supplies kit organised for evacuation and follow the steps for evacuation as outlined earlier.

Shelter

Taking shelter is critical in times of disaster. This may mean staying in an enclosed structure during a severe storm without electricity for days.

In many emergencies, local authorities would set up public shelters in schools, municipal buildings and places of worship. While they often provide water, food, medicine and basic sanitary facilities, families should plan to have their own supplies as well.

Living in Designated Emergency Shelters

1. Stay in the shelter until local authorities say it's okay to leave. The length of the stay can range from a few hours to few days.

2. Restrict smoking to well-ventilated areas. Ensure that smoking materials are disposed of safely.

3. Cooperate with local authorities and others staying in the shelter. Living with many families in a confined space can be difficult and unpleasant.

4. Listen to radio broadcasts.

5. Watch for fires.

6. Assist local authorities as volunteers in the management of water, cooked food and other relief supplies including medical care, if required

7. Make arrangements for pets and cattle before going to a public shelter. They are not allowed in a public shelter due to health reasons.

8. Organise recreation for children

9. Assist local authorities with the assistance of community members to maintain law and order

Helping after Disaster

When disaster strikes, people everywhere want to help those in need. To ensure that this compassion and generosity are put to good use, the media can highlight these facts:

· Financial aid is an immediate need of disaster victims. Financial contributions should be made through local administration or a well-known voluntary organisation to help ensure that contributions are put to their intended use.

· Before donating food or clothing, wait for instructions from local officials. Immediately after a disaster, relief workers usually don't have time or facilities to set-up distribution channels, and too often these items go to waste.

· Volunteers should go through a well-known voluntary agency since these agencies will know what is needed and are prepared to deal with the need. Local authorities also coordinate volunteer efforts for helping in disasters.

· Organisations and community groups wishing to donate items should first contact local officials, and voluntary agencies working on relief to find out what is needed and where to send it. Be prepared to deliver the items to different places, tell officials when you'll be there, but do not expect them to provide for transportation, driver, and unloading.

Disaster Specific Family Preparedness Measures

Fires

[In addition to what has been listed under family preparedness as a generic response, fire accidents demand specific preparedness and responses. Given below are the preparedness measures and responses which are specific to fire accidents].

Fire spreads quickly; there is no time to grab valuables or inform administration. Heat and smoke are even more dangerous than the flames; inhaling the super-hot air can sear the lungs. Fire produces poisonous gases that make you disoriented and drowsy. Instead of being awakened by a fire, it may induce a deeper sleep.

In case of fire know what to do, how to escape, how to safeguard the occupants. Have a plan.

Fire safety tips

· Teach family members to stay low to the floor (where the air is safer in a fire) when escaping from a fire.

What to do during a fire

· Use water to put out small fires. Do not try to put out a fire that is getting out of control. Call the fire department. Make sure everyone knows how to call the fire department.

· Never use water on an electrical fire.

· Smother oil and grease fires in the kitchen with baking soda or salt, or put a lid over the flame if it is burning in a pan.

· If the clothes catch on fire, the person should stop, drop and roll until the fire is extinguished. Running only makes the fire burn faster. Those assisting should pour water and not try to control it with bare hands.

· Feel for heat near the top of the door before opening. If it's hot, don't open it unless it is an escape route. In such a case Feel the bottom of the door with the palm of your hand before opening it. If the door is cool, leave immediately. Be prepared to crawl. Smoke and heat rise, and the air is clearer and cooler near the floor. If the door is hot, escape through a window. If escape is not possible, signal and call out for help, alerting the fire fighters.

· Close doors of the rooms on fire. It will hold back the fire and keep out poisonous smoke until help arrives.

· If escape is not possible, stay near the floor, where the air is better. If all doors are closed, open a window for air. If possible, stuff wet rags around doors to hold back smoke and heat.

· Stay out. Do not, for any reason, go back into a burning house. If someone is missing, tell the fire fighters.

What to do after a fire

· Do not enter a fire-damaged structureunless authorities say it is okay.

· When entering a fire-damaged structure, look for signs of heat or smoke.

· Have an electrician check your household wiring before the current is turned on.

· Beware of structural damage. Roofs and floors may be weakened and need repair.

· Keep records of all clean-up and repair costs.

· Do not throw away any damaged goods until an official inventory has been taken.

· In case of tenancy, contact the landlord.

· Secure personal belongings or move them to another location.

· Discard food and medicines that have been exposed to heat, smoke or soot.

· Do not try to open a safe or strong box. It can hold intense heat for several hours. If the door is opened before the box has cooled, the entering air combined with the high internal temperature can cause the contents to burst into flames.

· If the local administration say the structure is unsafe and must be vacated :

¨ Ask local police or CERT volunteers to watch the property

¨ Take jewellery, cash, and financial records and other important documents.

¨ After vacating, notify the new residential address to friends, relatives, police and fire departments, delivery services, employers, schools and the post office

Earthquakes

[In addition to what has been listed under family preparedness as a generic response, earthquakes demand specific preparedness and responses. Given below are the preparedness measures and responses which are specific to earthquakes].

The actual movement of the ground in an earthquake is seldom the direct cause of death and injury. Most casualties result from falling objects and debris. Earthquakes also may trigger landslides and generate huge ocean waves, each of which can cause great damage. There are many actions which can be taken to reduce the dangers.

Preparing for an Earthquake

· Prepare a home Earthquake plan

· Choose a safe place in every room - under a sturdy table or desk or against an inside wall where nothing can fall on you.

· Practice drop, cover, and hold on at least twice a year. Drop under a sturdy desk or table, hold on, and protect the eyes by pressing the face against the arm. If there is no table or desk nearby, sit on the floor against an interior wall away from windows or tall furniture that could fall on you.

· Teach children to drop, cover, and hold on

During an Earthquake

· Stay calm.

· Inside, stand in a doorway or crouch under a desk or table, away from windows. Watch for falling objects. If in bed, hold on and stay there, protecting the head with a pillow. Drop, cover, and hold on

· Outdoors, stand away from buildings, trees, telephone, and electrical lines.

· On the road, drive away from subways, flyovers and bridges. Stop in safe area. Stay in vehicle.

After an Earthquake

· Check for injuries. Provide first aid.

· Check for water, sewage breaks and for downed electrical lines and short-circuits. Turn off appropriate utilities. Look for and extinguish small fires. Eliminate fire hazards.

· Check for building damage and potential safety problems.

· Clean up dangerous spills.

· Turn on radio and listen for instructions from local authorities/police/fire brigade

· Don't use the telephone except for emergencies.

· Expect aftershocks. Each time you feel one, drop, cover, and hold on

Floods and Flash Floods

[In addition to what has been listed under family preparedness as a generic response, floods demand specific preparedness and responses. Given below are the preparedness measures and responses which are specific to floods].

Floods are the most common and widespread of all natural hazards. Some floods develop over a period of days, but flash floods can result in raging waters in just a few minutes. Flash floods carry rocks, mud and other debris and can occur without any visible sign of rainfall. Land slides are another danger created by flooding.

Before a Flood

· Find out if the area is flood-prone from the local authorities.

· Understand the flood levels and learn about the history of flooding in the community.

· Learn flood warning signs and community alert signals and know the terms used to describe flooding.

During a Flood Watch

· Listen to a battery-operated radio for the latest flood information. Fill buckets and other water containers with clean water in case water becomes contaminated.

· Be aware of flash floods. Flash floods will rise faster and cut off the escape routes. If there is any possibility of a flash flood occurring, move immediately to higher ground. Do not wait for instructions to move.

· Move valuable household possessions to the upper floors or to safe ground if time permits.

During a Flood

If Indoors:

· Turn on battery-operated radio or television to get the latest emergency information.

· Get your preassembled emergency supplies.

· If told to leave, do so immediately.

If Outdoors:

· Climb to high ground and stay there. Avoid walking through any floodwaters. If it is moving swiftly, even shallow water can sweep you off your feet.

· Do not allow children to play in flood waters

If In A vehicle:

· If travelling towards a flooded area, turn around and go another way.

· If the vehicle stalls, abandon it immediately on the side of the road and climb to higher ground. Many deaths have resulted from attempts to move stalled vehicles.

· If trapped in a vehicle that is going under water, get out of the submerged vehicle by opening a window or door and swimming to safety.

After a Flood

· Flood dangers do not end when the water begins to recede. Listen to a radio or television and don't return home until authorities indicate it is safe to do so.

· When entering buildings, use extreme caution.

· Examine walls, floors, doors, and windows to make sure that the building is not in danger of collapsing.

· Watch out for animals, especially poisonous snakes, that may have got into the house with the flood waters. Use a stick to poke through debris.

· Watch for loose plaster and ceilings that could fall.

· Throw away food that has come in contact with flood waters.

· Remove water from the house to avoid structural damage.

Epidemics

[In addition to what has been listed under family preparedness as a generic response, epidemics demand specific preparedness and responses. Given below are the preparedness measures and responses which are specific to epidemics ].

Different epidemics will have different etymology and consequences. Water-borne, vector-borne or viral epidemics will need different levels of preparedness and response. Some epidemics may have a quick onset whereas others may take a longer time to spread. The public health department is primarily concerned with issuing the epidemic warning and declaring the areas as epidemic prone.

After the warning

· Understand the specific nature of the epidemic including the causation, nature of spread, symptoms and medication

· Understand the specific precautionary and preventive measures to be taken by the family members.

· Ensure intake of safe water and food. Take extra measures to protect food stocks.

· Receive all recommended vaccinations, inoculations and encourage the neighbours to help health authorities to prevent spread of epidemics

· Avoid stockpiling preventive medicines at family level. This may create a severe shortage of essential drugs.

· Take extra-care in disposal of family waste and also assist in community efforts in disposal of waste

· Keep in constant touch with epidemic information and public health staff in the area

During the Epidemic

· Report any symptoms to the health authorities immediately

· Understand if there is a need for quarantine

· Understand the nature of treatment and possible emergencies

· Do not leave the epidemic area without a clearance from the health authorities

· Report arrival of any guests from the epidemic area

· Discourage relatives and friends from outside epidemic area to visit your areas

· Understand the steps to be taken in the disposal of personnel belongings of the patient including disposal of excreta

· Understand the procedure for disposal of the dead body of the epidemic victim

Road Accidents

[In addition to what has been listed under family preparedness as a generic response, road accidents demand specific preparedness and responses. Given below are the preparedness measures and responses which are specific to road accidents].

Road Accidents are a major killer and take place without any warning. Accidents may involve passenger vehicles, goods vehicles, vehicles carrying hazardous and toxic materials. The damage therefore may involve injuries and deaths, chemical spills, fires or release of toxic gases.

On accident event (involving passenger vehicle)

Those at the accident site should follow the following priorities

· Look for and rescue the injured or those trapped in the vehicles

· Arrange for transport of the injured to the nearest medical care centre

· Place the dead bodies on one side to avoid obstructions

· Organise locally traffic control using the available manpower to avoid traffic jams

· Discourage people from crowding near the accident spot

· Discourage people from looting the goods from the accident vehicle

· Arrange to inform the nearest traffic police post through passing vehicles on either side

On accident event (involving hazardous and toxic elements)

· Do not go anywhere near the accident spot unless the hazardous and toxic elements are properly understood and discourage others. The contents may explode or catch fire

· Prevent people at the accident site from lighting of matches for cigarettes etc.

· Discourage people from collecting the spills from the accident vehicle as the chemicals might be deceptive and lead to toxic exposure or explosions

· Arrange to inform the nearest traffic police/fire brigade through passing vehicles

· Identify the wind direction and move in the opposite direction

· Do not allow any traffic congestion near the accident spot

· Stop the traffic at a sufficient distance (at least half a kilometre) from the accident spot in all directions till the nature of chemicals is properly understood

Dissemination of DDMAP

In order for the DDMAP to be effective it would be disseminated at two levels ;

· to the district authorities, government departments, NGOs and other agencies and institutions within the district and

· to general public.

Effective dissemination of plan requires a well designed and focused training and awareness programmes. The responsibility for dissemination of the plan is vested with the District Disaster Manager, at the Collectorate, and training activities will be carried out under the guidance and direction of YASHADA, as well as through awareness programmes organised by each of the agencies participating in disaster management such as Irrigation Department organising warning and evacuation exercises or Fire Brigade demonstrating rescue operations. The District Disaster Manager would also involve NGOs in preparing suitable public awareness material to be distributed to the public. The specific NGOs to be involved in these exercises are given below.

List of NGOs to be involved in Plan Dissemination

The training programmes will be organised for different levels of functionaries. The district level officials and identified NGOs, Private Sector organisations will receive the training at YASHADA under their Training of Trainers (TOT) programme in order to equip them to extend training facilities to functionaries at taluka and village level as well as organise simulation exercises within the community. Some of the select government training institutions at the district level will participate in such TOTs and undertake training programmes for government functionaries. Efforts will be therefore directed to decentralise training activity to the extent possible so as to enable YASHADA to serve as resource centre and provide training expertise to various groups.

The materials for awareness programmes at community level would be prepared in the local language to ensure widespread dissemination. Media would be extensively used for public awareness programmes. These will include

Þ newspapers including local ones

Þ TV

Þ local cable networks

Þ radio

Þ folk media

Þ publicity material

Schools, colleges and other public institutions would be specifically targetted.

In addition to dissemination of literature related to the DDMAP, disaster response drills should be conducted on a regular basis especially in the disaster prone areas to maintain the readiness of communities and departments as regards operational procedures, personnel and equipment and orderly response.

Local agencies such as fire, police and ambulance staff would be familiar with the disasters possible in an area. Mutual aid organizations and public emergency response organizations would be included in these drills

The objectives of full scale drill include evaluation of the following:

· practicality of the plan (structure and organization)

· adequacy of communications and interactions among agencies and the public

· emergency equipment effectiveness

· adequacy of first aid and rescue procedures

· adequacy of emergency personnel response and training

· public relations skills

· evacuation and count procedures

Plan Evaluation

The purpose of evaluation of DDMAP is to determine

· the adequacy of resources

· coordination between various agencies

· community participation

· partnership with NGOs

The ease of understanding and using the plan will also be important considerations.

The plan will be updated when shortcomings are observed in

· organizational structures

· technological changes render information obsolete;

· response mechanism following reports on drills or exercises;

· assignments of state agencies.

Adaptation, improvisation and optimisation are corner stones of any planning pertaining to disasters. It must be emphasized that the Documents or Manuals prepared as disaster management plan have a limited purpose. These can at best serve as reminder of tasks and activities.

Individuals and agencies assigned specific responsibilities within this Plan will prepare appropriate supporting plans and related standard operating procedures, periodically review and update alerting procedures and resource listings, and maintain an acceptable level of preparedness.

The DDMAP would be evaluated by both the district and the state.

Post-Disaster Evaluation

A post-incident evaluation would be done after the withdrawal of relief and rehabilitation activities in order to assess

· the nature of state intervention and support,

· suitability of the organization structure,

· institutional arrangements,

· adequacy of Operating Procedures,

· monitoring mechanisms,

· information tools,

· equipment,

· communication system, etc.,

The impact studies on the above operations for long-term preventive and mitigation efforts are also to be undertaken.

At the community level, evaluation exercises may be undertaken to assess the reactions of the community members at various stages in the disaster management cycle and to understand their perceptions about disaster response in terms of

· adequacy of training,

· alert and warning systems,

· control room functions,

· communication plans,

· security,

· containment

· recovery procedures,

· monitoring

Plan Update

The DDMAP is a “living document” and the Collector along with YASHADA will update it every year taking into consideration

· the resource requirements,

· updates on human resources

· technology to be used

· coordination issues

An annual conference for DMAP update will be organised by the Collector. All concerned departments and agencies would participate and give recommendations on specific issues.

The following guidelines would be adhered to while updating the DDMAP :

· A procedure, would be in place to update the plan on a regular basis to ensure that the items requiring updation are considered and are current.

· When an amendment is made to a plan, the amendment date would be noted on the updated page of the plan.

· A senior official in every agency would be designated to ensure that all plan-holders are notified of changes as soon as possible. Plan-holders would be requested to verify that they have received the changes.

Annexure I: Guidelines for Formation of MARG

In areas where there is a concentration of hazardous industries, Mutual Aid and Response Groups can be organised to make the industrial zone to be self-sufficient to a fairly large extent and manage industrial accidents, both on-site and off-site.

The pre-requisite for setting up such a group are

1. General information on industries, settlements and geo-physical and climatic data

2. Zoning of the Industrial area with listing of industries in each zone

3. Identification of lead industry and the group leader and assistant group leaders with their names, addresses and telephones, who would act as liaison persons

4. Identification of technical experts in each zone with their names and addresses who would respond to the call for assistance

5. Identification of potential hazards/toxic materials with the list containing physical and hazardous properties, procedures for responding spillage and leakage, cautions to be taken including emergency procedures, naturalisation procedures, protective equipments, emergency equipments, first-aid.

6. List of hazardous chemicals and quantities stored by different industries

7. Names, locations and telephone numbers of hospitals and poison centres

Guidelines For Seeking MARG Assistance

Preparation :

1. All concerned industries should prepare an Onsite Emergency Control plan with following information.

· Risk Analysis.

· Safety and Environmental Audit

· Worst case scenario.

· List of inventories.

· Hazard Identification

· Material safety data sheets

· Plant layout with escape routes

· Demographic and geographic situation.

· Location of Fire hydrants

· Distances between the processes and facilities in plant and in immediate vicinity of plant be logged and determined in terms of time and distance.

· Evacuation procedure

· Emergency control organisation structure

· Responsible personnel list with addresses and telephone numbers.

· Available emergency control facilities.

2. An effort has to be made to dovetail Onsite plan to Off-Site plan.

3. Such plan should be available in the designated Emergency Control Centre of the factory, Directorate of Industrial Safety and Health, Fire Brigade, Police, District/Corporation Officials and Collector and should be updated periodically.

4. Training sessions and mock drills in First Aid, Fire Fighting, Evacuation, First Responder. Regular testing of plants processes should be conducted to appraise and train different levels of employees in emergency control.

During An Emergency :

1. During an emergency, assistance should be sought from the immediate neighbouring MARG Member/s enlisted zonewise having appropriate expertise as per the guidelines and equipments, gadgets for controlling situation and Statutory Authorities simultaneously.

2. All the personnel in each factory who are responders for emergency must be made aware about the availability of such MARG assistance and methods of getting it.

3. Assisting organisation must be properly briefed by the unit seeking the assistance about the nature of emergency, materials involved and meteorology conditions (Wind direction), precise nature of help required to ensure proper response.

4. Assistance can be requested in the form of either equipment or expertise or both with expert operating personnel.

5. In case of equipment received from assisting organisation

· It must be properly used

· Returned promptly

· In case of damage it should be repaired from approved agency and returned in working condition.

· Consumables should be replaced/reimbursed.

6. When a MARG member is extending help to Non-MARG member or other organisation make sure that

· Appropriate equipment tested for the purpose is given.

· If your personnel are attending the emergencies ensure that they are well-versed and have worked under such a situation and are able to give guidance.

· The situation and the materials involved are being briefed to you correctly.

· The guidance about plants, processes and materials involved is available on the spot from the organisation receiving the assistance

7. It is understood that in case of any accident to any personnel while assisting, organisation that is receiving help extend its co-operation in bearing a reasonable part of expenses, beyond that covered by an insurance policy.

8. Following sequence of action is recommended while seeking help

· First Deploy internal resources.

· Inform civic Fire Brigade and get their assistance. Inform the Statutory Authorities, keep appropriate MARG member in your zone/neighbourhood alerted about the emergency.

· If found necessary request help from the MARG member to control specific situation for which it has got equipment and expertise.

· Convey clearly what you want, expertise, equipment or both and exact nature of need.

· Keep other MARG member in your zone alerted to render any further assistance, if the situation so demands.

General :

· Each organisation is primarily responsible for keeping its plants in safe conditions, identifying, assessing, minimising and eliminating hazards and risk, maintaining necessary equipment for special kinds of risks that the organisation might be facing and training its personnel for emergency response and control.

· It may seek help from others in the MARG by way of equipment, expertise and special materials, but this is only complementary to its own arrangements and commitment to safety and emergency control.

· Mutual Aid and Response is sought only when your own efforts seems to be inadequate to meet the demand of the situation and that of civic response group is either not adequate or enough.

FACILITIES, RESOURCES, AGENCIES WITH CONTACT ADDRESSES & TELEPHONE NUMBERS

Government Sector

Revenue Department

Facility/

Resource

Location

Authority incharge

Alternate authority

 

Car, Jeeps  and  Administr-aion

 

 

 

Jeep

 

 

 

Jeep

 

 

 

Jeep

 

 

 

Jeep

 

 

 

Jeep

 

 

 

Jeep

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jeep

 

 

 

Jeep

 

 

 

Jeep

 

 

 

Jeep

 

 

 

Jeep

 

 

 

Jeep

 

 

 

Jeep

 

 

 

Jeep

 

 

 

 

 

 

Parbhani

 

 

 

 

Sailu

 

 

 

Hingoli

 

 

 

Parbhani

 

 

 

Gangakhed

 

 

 

Pathri

 

 

 

Sailu

 

 

 

 

 

 

Purna

 

 

 

Palam

 

 

 

Hingoli

 

 

 

Kalamnuri

 

 

 

Jintur

 

 

 

Basmath

 

 

 

Aundha

 

 

 

Sengaon

 

 

 

 

 

Dist. Collector         23555(o)

Parbhani                  2444(R)

                               22444(F)

 

Shri R.L.Gagrani     22008(o)

Sub Divisional        22056(R)

Officer, Sailu          22008 (F)

 

Shri A.A. Shingare  22001(o)

Sub Divisional        22250(R)

Officer, Hingoli      22001(F)

 

Shri Y.Y. Tidke       22711(o)

Tahasildar,              22712(R)

Parbhani                  22711(F)

 

Shri B.M.Kamble    20023(o)

Tahasildar,              20348(R)

Gangakhed               20023(F)

 

Shri P.R.Kulkarni    55321(o)

Tahasildar,              22712(R)

Pathri                       22711(F)

 

Shri L.S. Jogi           3334(o)         

Tahasildar,              20386(R) 

Sailu                        22334(F)

 

 

R.S.Bhalerao           55173(o) 

Tahasildar,              55174(R)

Purna                            

 

Shri S.N.Ghansawant 

Tahasildar,              70253(o)

Palam                     70254(R)

 

 

 

Shri B.U.Todkar      22002(o)

Tahasildar,              22248(R)

Hingoli                    22002(F)

 

Shri N.G. Khandare

Tahasildar,              4221(o)

Kalamnuri                4201(R)

 

Shri R.S. Gaikawad 24027(o) Tahasildar,             24103(R)

Jintur                       24027(F)

 

Shri R.L.Pillewad   24028(o)

Tahasildar,              24105(R)

Basmath                  24028(F)

 

Shri Kishor Kamune

Tahasildar,              60074(o)

Aundha                  

 

Shri G.N. Poddar   40215(o)

Tahasildar,             40216(R)

Sengaon                 

 

 

 

Resident  Deputy  23702 0) 

Collector,             23701(R)

Parbhani

 

Aawal  Karkun     22008(o)

 

 

 

Aawal  Karkun     22001(o)

 

 

 

Shri A.B. Joshi   22008(o)

Resident Naib Tahasildar,

Parbhani

 

Shri T.N.Ghawale 20023(o)

R.Naib Tahasildar,

Gangakhed

 

Shri A.V. Dadke    55321(o)

Resident Naib Tahasildar,

Pathri

 

Shri G.R. Rathod    3334(o)

R.Naib Tahasildar,

Sailu

 

 

 

Shri R.S. Bhalerao55173(o)

Resident Naib Tahasildar,

Purna

 

Shri S.S. Kandle   70253(o)

R.Naib Tahasildar,

Palam

 

 

Shri P.T.Paulbudhe  

Resident Naib Tahasildar,                           

Hingoli               22002(o)

 

Shri M.B.Nalwade  4221(o)

R.Naib Tahasildar,

Kalamnuri

 

Shri S.V.Kokate    24027(o)

Resident Naib Tahasildar,

Jintur

 

Shri D.K. Oval      24028(o)

Resident Naib Tahasildar,

Basmath

 

Shri R.G.Deshpande

Resident Naib Tahasildar,

Aundha                  60074(o)

 

Shri R.K. Pajai      40125(o)  

Resident Naib Tahasildar,

Sengaon



Police

Facility/

Resource

Location

Authority incharge

Alternate authority

 

Wireless,    Vans and Jeep

 

 

Wireless & Jeep  

 

 

Wireless & Jeep

 

 

Wireless & Jeep

 

 

 

Wireless & Jeep

 

 

Wireless & Jeep

 

 

Wireless & Jeep

 

 

Wireless & Jeep

 

 

Wireless & Jeep

 

 

Wireless & Jeep

 

 

Wireless & Jeep

 

 

Wireless & Jeep

 

 

Wireless & Jeep

 

 

Wireless & Jeep

 

 

 

Wireless & Jeep

 

 

Wireless & Jeep

 

 

Wireless & Jeep

 

 

Wireless & Jeep

 

 

Wireless & Jeep

 

 

Wireless & Jeep

 

 

Wireless & Jeep

 

 

Wireless & Jeep

 

 

Wireless & Jeep

 

 

Wireless & Jeep

 

 

Wireless & Jeep

 

 

Wireless & Jeep

 

 

Wireless & Jeep

 

 

Wireless & Jeep

 

 

Wireless & Jeep

 

 

Wireless & Jeep

 

 

Wireless & Jeep

 

Wireless & Jeep

 

 

Wireless & Jeep

 

 

 

Parbhani

 

 

 

Parbhani

 

 

Hingoli

 

 

Gangakhed

 

 

 

Sailu

 

 

Parbhani

 

 

Gangakhed

 

 

Parbhani   

 

 

Parbhani

 

 

Parbhani

 

 

Palam

 

 

Pathri

 

 

Sailu

 

 

Jintur

 

 

 

Aundha

 

 

Sengaon

 

 

Hingoli (Tq)

 

 

Kalamnuri

 

 

Basmath

 

 

Pruna

 

 

Sonpeth

 

 

Daithana

 

 

Tadkalas

 

 

Manwath

 

 

Bori

 

 

Bamni

 

 

Kurunda

 

 

Hatta

 

 

Balapur

 

 

Goregaon

 

 

Basamba

 

Narsi

 

 

Hingoli

 

 

     

 

Shri M.K. Rathod   23444(o)

Dist.Supt. of           3333(R)

Police,Parbhani      23157(F)         

 

Shri  S.G. Dabhade 22512(o)

Dy.  S.P. Parbhani  22730(R)

 

Shri V.D. Dshmukh22019(o)

Dy. S.P. Hingoli    22062 (R)

 

Shri S.P.Bhalerao   22246(o)

Dy. S.P.Gangakhed22354(R)

 

 

Shri N.U.Bodkhe,  22103 (o)

Dy. S.P. Sailu        22354(R)

 

Shri B.M. Chalak   20550 (o) 

P.I. Nanalpeth        20604(R)

 

Shri K.V. Shinde    20033(o)

P.I. Gangakhed  

    

Shri  G.Y. Sarode,  20170(o)

PSI  Parbhani

 

Shri P.V. Giri,        21430(o)

PSI  Kotwali

 

Shri V.S. Angule,   20637(o)

API,  Parbhani         

 

Shri S.H. Gandham,60235(o)

PSI  Palam

 

Shri S.S. More       67033(o)

PSI   Pathari

 

Shri  G.N. Poul       22133(o)

API  Sailu              22363(R)

 

Shri  V.M. Pawar,  24033(o)

PSI  Jintur

 

 

Shri M.N. Chanda  60055(o)

PSI  Aundha

 

Shri D.L. Mundhe  40247(o) 

PSI   Sengaon

 

Shri A.Y. Alsatwar 22003(o)

PSI  Hingoli

 

Shri B.J. Sontakke  44233(o)

API,  Kalamnuri

 

Shri A.D. Parihar    24033(o)

PSI  Basmath

 

Shri  V.V. Mule      24230(o)

PSI  Purna

 

Shri  V.V. Shelke,  40238(o)

PSI  Sonpeth

 

Shri R.D. Chewale  67033(o)

PSI  Daithana

 

Shri M.P.  Ingle    

PSI  Tadkalas

 

Shri S.C. Sangle     44133(o)

PSI  Manwath

 

Shri  T.D. Rathod     2330(o)

PSI  Bori

 

Shri B.B. Shinde       

PSI  Bamni

 

Shri  V.B. Kamble   6043(o)

PSI  Kurunda

 

Shri V.D. Molwane, 6810(o)

PSI  Hatta                   

 

Shri  M.A. Bakhare  2333(o) 

API  Balapur

 

Shri C.M. Tambade, 3041(o) 

PSI  Goregaon

 

Shri R.N. Chate,

PSI  Basamba

Shri  A.V. Rajput

PSI  Narsi

 

Shri  B.D. Musle      3261(o)

API  Hingoli

 

 

Shri U.K. Suryawanshi

Home Dy. S.P.     23157 (o)

Parbhani              23054 (R)

                            23157 (F)

Shri C.S. Sawale 22512 (o) Reader to Dy S.P.  Parbhani

 

Shri Nillawar,     22019 (o) Redear to Dy. S.P.  Hingoli   

 

Shri  Satpute       22446 (o)

Reader to Dy S.P. Gangakhed 

 

Shri M.S.Warade 22103 (o) Reader to  Dy.S.P,  Sailu          

 

P.S.O.                   20450(o)

 

 

P.S.O.                   22233(o)

 

 

P.S.O.                   20170(o)

 

 

P.S.O.                   21430(o)

 

 

P.S.O.                   20637(o)

 

 

P.S.O.                   60235(o)

 

 

P.S.O.                   67033(o)

 

 

P.S.O.                   22133(o)

 

 

P.S.O.                   24033(o)

 

 

 

P.S.O.                   60055(o)

 

 

P.S.O.                   40247(o)

 

 

P.S.O.                   22003(o)

 

 

P.S.O.                   44233(o)

 

 

P.S.O.                   24233(o)

 

 

P.S.O.                   44233(o)

 

 

P.S.O.                   40238(o)

 

 

P.S.O.                   67033(o)

 

 

P.S.O.                   

 

 

P.S.O.                   44133(o)

 

 

P.S.O.                     2330(o)

 

 

P.S.O.                  

 

 

P.S.O.                   46043(o)

 

 

P.S.O.                    6810 (o)

 

 

P.S.O.                    2333 (o)

 

 

P.S.O.                   63041(o)

 

 

P.S.O.                  

 

P.S.O.                  

 

 

P.S.O.                    3261 (o)

 

Home Guards

Facility/

Resource

Location

Authority incharge

Alternate authority

 

Jeep with Homgards

 

 

 

 

Jintur Road Jamkar Com-pex  Parbhani

 

R.D.Wadgaonker    20083(o)

Dist.Commandant  20188(R)

Home  Guard ,  Parbhani

 

Staff  Officer  to District

Commendant  Home Guard              

Officer, Parbhani

Health Department

Facility/

Resource

Location

Authority incharge

Alternate authority

 

Vans, Ambulance, Madical equipments with  Medical  staff

 

 

Medical Staff

 

 

Medical Staff

 

 

Medical Staff

 

 

Medical Staff

 

 

Medical Staff

 

 

Medical Staff

 

 

Medical Staff

 

 

Medical Staff

 

 

Medical Staff

 

 

Medical Staff

 

 

Medical Staff

Medical Staff

Medical Staff

 

 

Civil.Hosital

Parbhani

 

 

 

 

 

Rural Hospital

Hingoli

 

Rural Hospital

Kalamnuri

 

Rural Hospital

Aundha (N)

 

Rural Hospital

Gangakhed

 

Rural Hospital

Bori

 

Rural Hospital

Jintur

 

Rural Hospital

Sailu

 

Rural Hospital

Manwat

 

Rural Hospital

Basmath

 

Rural Hospital

Purna

 

Rural Hospital

Palam

Rural Hospital

Pathri

Rural Hospital

Sengaon

 

 

Dr. VedPathak      23458 (H)

Civil Surg. Pbn     20037 (R)

 

 

 

 

 

Dr. A.S. Virdhe    22335 (H)

Med.Supdt.Hingoli

 

Dr. A. K. Kankal      6263(H)

MS, RH  Kalamnuri

 

Dr. Gauri Vatkar     60344(H)

MS, RH  Aundha     

 

Dr. H.C. Gante       22006(H)

 MS, RH  Gangakhed

 

Dr. S.M. Tompe     42339(H)

MS, RH  Bori

 

Dr. M.B. Swami     24231(H)

MS, RH  Jintur

 

Dr.  V.D. Bade        2316(H)

MS, RH  Sailu          

 

Dr. S.K. Dhanwale  4206(H)

MS, RH  Manwat

 

Dr. N.G. Rathod      4202(H)

MS, RH  Basmath

 

Dr. D.V. Zanwar

MS, RH  Purna

 

Dr. M.M. Dhutade

MS, RH   Palam

Dr.  A. Fatima

MS, RH  Pathri

Dr. S.C. Mandavi

MS, RH  Sengaon

 

 

Dr. M.Y.Mawalege,  20037

Res. Medical Officer (C)

 

 

 

 

 

Dr. V.G. Kadjav,

Medi. Officer RH  Hingoli

 

Dr. B.F. Jondhale     4263

Medi.OfficerRH Kalamnuri

 

S.G. Kale               60344

Medi. Officer RH Aundha

 

Dr. Biyani R.M      22006

Medi.OfficerRHGangakhed

 

Dr. S.R. Khondkar  42339

Medi. Officer RH Bori

 

Dr. S.T. Chawandke  24231

Medi. Officer RH  Jintur

 

Dr. A.A. Deshpande  22316

Madi. Officer RH  Sailu

 

Dr. D.M. Pensalwar  24202

Medi. Officer RH  Manwat

 

Dr. R.E. Jawadekar   

Medi. Officer RH  Basmath

 

Dr. D.V. Zanwar

Medi. Officer RH  Purna

Dr. Dhutade

Medi. Officer RH  Palam

Dr. A. Fatima

Medi. Officer RH  Pathri

Dr. S.C. Mandavi

Medi. Officer RH Sengaon

 

Public Health Department

Facility/

Resource

Location

Authority incharge

Alternate authority

 

Jeeps, Ambulace and  Vans

 

Parbhani

 

Dr. P.L. Bharti        20526 (o)

Dist. Health

Officer Z.P.  Parbhani

 

 

Dr. P.C. Shinde    20526 (o)      

Assi.Dist.Health 

Officer Z.P.  Parbhani

 

 

Fire Brigade

Facility/

Resource

Location

Authority incharge

Alternate authority

 

Fire Extingusher  

Van

 

Fire Extingusher  

Van

 

 

Parbhani

 

 

 

Jintur

Dist. Parbhani

 

Shri  A.Y. Karche    23809(o)

Chief  Officer, M.C.23638(R)

Pbn .  ( Fire Begrade-20101 )  

 

H.A. Rizvi          24038 (o) 

Chief Officer      24071 (R)

M.C. Jintur 

 

Shri Basitkhan       23809(o)

Administative Officer

 

 

B.R Shobhane      24041 (o) 

Jintur Dist. Parbhani

 

 


Civil Supplies

Facility/ Resource

Location

Authority incharge

Alternate authority

 

Jeep and Grain  Supply

 

Parbhani

 

Shri  N.T. Jhadav

Dist.Supply             23655(o)

Officer, Parbhani    22666®

 

Shri  M.G. More

Asst. Dist.Supply  23655(o)

Officer Parbhani.

 


Maharashtra State Electricity Board

Facility/ Resource

Location

Authority incharge

Alternate authority

 

Jeeps, Trucks

 

Jeeps, Trucks

 

 

Parbhani

 

 

Hingoli

 

 

Shri  G.B. Modi      22681(o)

Executive Engineer 23607(R)

 

Shri  S.B. Kharat     22345(o)

Executive Engineer 22554(R)

 

Shri  A.R.Pawar    22681(o)    

Dy. Executive Engineer

 

Shri R.N.Shivnani 22345(o)

Dy.Executive Engineer

 

Irrigation Department

Facility/ Resource

Location

Authority incharge

Alternate authority

 

Machinery

Heavy

Machinery

and  Flood Control

 

Parbhani

 

Shri U.D. Puranker  20210(o)

Executive Engineer 23082(R)

 

Shri R.J. Chandan   21242(R)

Sub-Divisional Officer

 

Shri B.V.Kachhawa21287(R)

Sub-Divisional Officer  Divn. No.1 Parbhani.

 

Abdul Gaffar          24108(R)

Sub-Divisional Engineer

Divn. No.2  Jintur

 

Shri B.P.Manuarkar22145(R)

Sub-Divisional Engineer

Divn.No.3 Hingoli

 

Shri  D.V. Shaunk   22483(R)

Asstt. Engineer (GR-1)

Sub-Divn. Hingoli

 

Mohmed Fayz

Sub-Divisional Engineer

Sub.-Divn. Hingoli

 

 

B.N.Panjawani   21570(o)

Dy. Executive Engineer 

 

Machinery

,Heavy

Machinery

and  Flood Control

 

Zilla Parishad

Parbhani

 

 

 

 

 

 

Shri  B.D. Mulgir    20115(o)

Executive Engineer 23027(o)  

Minor Irrigation      20069(o)

Divn. Parbhani        23864(o)

                       Ext-125 & 126

                               48196(R)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



Public works Department

Facility/ Resource

Location

Authority incharge

Alternate authority

 

Machinery for const-ruction of  Roads bridges and structures 

 

 

Machinery for const-ruction of  Roads bridges and structures 

 

Machinery for const-ruction of  Roads bridges and structures 

 

   - do -

 

 

 

    - do -

 

 

 

    - do -

      

 

 

 

     - do -

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Parbhani

 

 

 

 

 

Hingoli

 

 

 

 

Parbhani

 

 

 

 

Parbhani

 

 

 

Gangakhed  

 

 

 

Basmath

 

 

 

 

Hingoli

 

 

 

 

Shri N.V.Mendhekar  22708 o

Executive Engineer            

PWD Parbhani

(Rest House-20009)

 

 

Executive Engineer

PWD Hnigoli

 

 

 

Shri B.B. Maske     20115(o)

Executive Engineer (Ext-131)

(Works) Z.P. Parbhani.

 

 

Shri K.R.Patil        20115(o)

Dy. Engineer         (Ext-135)

(Works) Z.P. Parbhani

 

Shri P.G.Naikwade

Dy. Ex. Engineer

(Works) Z.P. Gangakhed

 

Shri M.R.Kulkarni

Dy. Ex. Engineer

(Works) Z.P. Basmath

Shri S.P.Kiwalekar 22120(o)

 

Dy. Ex. Engineer

(Works) Z.P. Hingoli

 

 

Shri U.A. Nilekar 22708(o)

Dy. Engineer

 

 

 

 

Dy. Engineer

PWD Hingoli

 

 

 

Shri A.B.Sirsode 20115(o)

Dy. Engineer (Ext-132)

(Works) Z.P. Parbhani

 

 

Office  Suptd.       20115(o)

 

 

 

Office  Suptd.       

 

 

 

Office  Suptd.      

 

 

 

 

Office  Suptd.       22120(o)

 

 

     


Facility/ Resource

Location

Authority incharge

Alternate authority

 

Machinery for const-ruction of  Roads bridges and structures 

 

    - do -

 

 

 

    - do -

 

 

 

     - do -

 

 

 

      - do -

 

 

 

      - do -

 

Hingoli

 

 

 

 

Hingoli

 

 

 

Aundha

Nagnath

 

 

Kalamanuri

 

 

 

Basmat

 

 

 

Parbhani

 

Shri B.R. Lunge       22612(o)

Executive Engineer 22371(R)

PWD Division Hingoli

 

 

Shri T.L. Gadhe       22424(o)

Sub-Divisional Engineer

PWD Sub-Divn. Hingoli

 

Shri Y.K. Khadse

Sub-Divisional Engineer

PWD Sub-Divn. Aundh (N)

 

Shri Abid Hussain     4267(o)

Sub-Divisional Engineer

PWD Divn. Kalamanuri

 

Shri  S.S. Pedi

Sub-Divisional Engineer

PWD  Divn. Wasmat

 

Shri V.G.Deshmukh 20899(o)

Sub-Divisional Engineer

PWD Sub-Divn. (s) Parbhani

 

 

Office  Supt.        22612(o)

 

 

 

 

Office Supt.       22424(o)

 

 

 

Office  Supt.        

 

 

 

Office  Supt.        4267(o)

 

 

 

Office  Supt.   

 

 

 

Office  Supt.      20899(o)

 

Machinary

for  construciton  of  roads, repairs to dams

 

 

 

Shri L.M. Pardeshi  31813(o)

Sub-Divisional Engineer

M.I. (L.S.) Sub-Divn

Parbhani

 

Executive Engineer

M.I. (L.S.) Sub-Divn

Parbhani



Ground Water Survey and Development Agency

Rigs for construction of   bore-wells

Parbhani

Shri S.S. Kuhikar   20312(o)

G.S.D.A. Administrative

Building,  Parbhani.



Maharashtra Jeevan Pradhikaran

Facility/ Resource

Location

Authority incharge

Alternate authority

 

Supply of Drinking Water,  Tanker and Jeeps etc

 

 

Parbhani

 

Shri P.D.Pimparwar20279(o)

Executive Engineer 20279(R)

Maharashtra Jeevan  Pradhikaran Work Divn.Parbhani

 

Shri   L.  Rama      20278(o)

P.A. To Ex.Eng., Parbhani


District Publicity Office

Media and News Paper,  for publicity

Parbhani

Shri Ratan J.Thakur 20047(o)

District Information23147®

Office, Parbhani

Office  Supt.        20047(o)



Regional Transport Office

For immediate acquisation /requisition of Govt. & Private vehicles

Parbhani

Shri V.Y.Puranik      48148(o)

Asst. R.T.O

Parbhani

Shri C.B.Meshram 48148(o

Insp. of  Motor Vehicles .             

Shri Kazi Z.M.     48148(o)

Asst. Inspector



M.S.R.T.C.

Facility/ Resource

Location

Authority incharge

Alternate authority

 

Buses for transportation of  public

 

  - do -

 

 

   - do -

 

 

   - do -

 

 

   - do -

 

 

   - do -

 

 

   - do -

 

 

   - do -

 

 

 

 

Parbhani

Divn.Office

 

 

Parbhani

Depot.

 

Jintur Depot.

 

 

Hingoli Depot

 

 

Gangakhed

Depot

 

Pathri Depot.

 

 

Wasmat Depot

 

 

Kalamnuri

Depot.

 

 

Shri V.F. Devare,   23127(o)

Divisional Controller

 

 

Shri V.S. Mudgal    23337(o)

Depot. Manager

 

Shri M.L.Irmale      24036(o)

Depot. Manager

 

Shri J.P. Modi        22084(o)

Depot. Manager

 

Shri V.V. Solankar  22322(o)

Depot. Manager

 

Mohd. Moinuddin   55346(o)

Depot. Manager

 

Shri B.B. Galande   24159(o)

Depot. Manager

 

Shri N.D. Nehare,     4249(o)

Depot. Manager

 

 

 

Shri C.V. Rugale 23579(o)

Mech. Engineer (OPN)

 

 

Shri S.G. Kadam  20422(o)

Divn. Traffic Officer

 

Shri V.N. Annadare,        

Traffic Inspector

 

Shri S.D. Lange

Traffic Inspector

 

Shri Doifode,

Asstt. Traffic Supdt.

 

Shri D.I. Potphode

Asstt. Traffic Supdt.

 

Shri B.C. Rathod

Traffic Inspector

 

Shri G.S. Shinde

Traffic Inspector

 

Shri Wanare,

Traffic Inspector



Telephone Department

Facility/ Resource

 

Authority incharge

Alternate authority

 

Telephon   Dept.

 

S.D.E.     

Planning

 

 

S.D.O.

Phone)

 

 S.D.E

      HRD)

 

S.D.O.

Telegraphs

 

S.D.O.

Telegraphs

     S.D.E.

       Sailu

 

     S.D.E.

Basmath

 

 

Telecom District  Engineer

 

Telephone

Service

 

 

Telephone

Service

 

Telephone

Service

 

Telephone

Service

 

 

Telephone

Service

 

Telephone

Service

 

Telephone

Service

 

 

Shri R.P. Majhwar  22200(o)

T.D.E., Parbhani     23100(F)

 

Shri  B.L.Deshmukh 2220(o)

S.D.E. (Plg)            23100(F)

Parbhani

 

Shri. S.L.Borakhadikar

S.D.O. (Phone), Parbhani

 

Shri  V.N. Kulkarni 2220(o)

S.D.E. (HRD)        23100(F)

 

Shri R.N. Malborgaonkar

S.D.O.Telegraphs  23500(o)

 

 

Shri S.L.Vyawahave

S.D.O.T.                22200(o)

 

Shri S.L. Ladde     22400(o)

S.D.E.Sailu

 

Shri  M.B. Shete    25000(o)

S.D.E.Basmath

 

 



Private Sector

S.No

Name

Location / Address

Authority incharge

Alternate authority

1

Vidya Bahrti Education Society

Bas Stand Road, Parbhani

Ashok Deshmukh         20976 

Kalyan Rege

2

Aannapurna

Sarwangin

Mahela Vikas Sanstha

Bhagya Nager, Parbhani

Sow Mahadevi Swami  48528

Sow Pratibha

Patil

3

Sambothi Shikshan

Prasarak

Mandal

Krushi Sarthak Colony

Parbhani

Dr. P.V. Yangde             48476

Dr. B.K. Dembre

4

Anusayabai

Ramrao Kute Prasa-rak Mandal

Vishwas  Nager

Adv.N.R. Kute

D.S. Deshpande

5

Bhagashri

Mahila

Mandal

Shri Nager Bank Colony

Parbhani

Sow S.P. Photmane

Sow S.S. Gundalsa

6

Jivan Jouti

Chritable Trust

Bhgaya Laxmi Nager

Parbhani

Dr. H.N. Nandkhedkar  23875

                

Dr. N.A. Zarkar



7

D.ed Trade & Employed Society

Rameshwar Nager

Parbhani

Dr. Magre

T.R. Shinde

8

Sangha Mitra Shikshan

Prasarak Mandal

32/2  Ragudas Society

Rahul Nager, Parbhani

Dr. Ubale                     24405

N.B. Salwe

9

Pandita Ramabai Samaj Seva

Mandal

Naryan Chal,  Parbhani

P.S. Dandekar

Shri S.M. Dandekar

10

Ramabai Ambekar Sikshan Prsarak Mandal

Jintur  Road,  Parbhani

Ashok Dudhgaonkar      21740

Jaibai Ambore



Private Medical Services

S.No

Facility/

Resource

Location / Address

Authority incharge

Alternate authority

11

Private Medical Services

Madhav Memorial Hospital Hingoli

Dr.H.B. Bagadiya    22106(H)

 D.H.O.

         

12

   - do -

Snehal  Hospital Hingoli

 Dr.S.S.Tapadia D.H.O. 22310

13

   - do -

Bhale Hopital Hingoli

Dr.S.D.Bhale           22336(H)

D.H.O                    .

14

    - do -

Rashi Hopital Hingoli

Dr.U.S. Soni D.H.O. 22538

15

     - do -

Sai Clinic

Dr.Dilip Narayan Jadhar D.H.M.S  33146

16

     - do -

Ambica Suticagraha

Dr. Saw.S.R.Kawar BAMS 44119

17

     - do -

Dhanvantan Clinic

Dr. Kaiks L. Chandkar BAMS

18

      - do -

Ankar Clinic

Dr. Saw P.G. Chevale BAMS

19

       - do -

Dawakhana

Dr. N.B.Dagady M.B.B.S 44422

20

      - do -

Prakash Clinic

Dr. N.H. Soni D.A.M.S

21

       - do -

Somani Hospital

Dr. V.G. Somani D.H.M.S. 44453

22

       - do -

Tirupati Clinic

Dr. Sachin Chidrawar



23

       - do -

SantDhnyaneshwar Clinic

Dr. V.P. Toshniwal D.H.M.S 44481

24

       - do -

Katrywar Clinic

Dr. A.N. Katorywar M.B.B.S 44172

25

 

       - do -

Chabadasarrmt Hospital

Dr. S.R. Chabada M.B.B.S. 44421

26

      - do -

Chabada Hospital

Dr. Dhairay Chabada M.B.B.S M. D

Dr. Mrs. T.D Chabada M.B.B.S DCH 44421

27

     - do -

Shir Clinic

Dr. R.S. Latkar D.H.M.S.

28

     - do -

Shantisudha Clinic

Dr. S.S. Dommbre B.A.M.S 44261

29

     - do -

Dawakhama

Dr. S.V. Khekale B.A.M.S. 33116

30

     - do -

 

Sanjivani MatHome

Dr. Saw S.S. Khekale BAMS 33165

31

     - do -

 

Ladda Hospital

Dr. D.B. Ladda MBBS 44417

32

     - do -

Ladda Hospital

Dr. R.G. Ladda DHMS

33

     - do -

Shivanery Clinic

Dr. S.U. Bhise BAMS

34

     - do -

 

Pankay Clinic

Dr. S.L Damdere MBBS 44358

35

     - do -

Vivekananl Clinic

Dr. S.N. Khadase DHMS 44265




36

      - do -

Gorakshan Comitni Dharmarth Dawakna

Dr. Khekale

37

    - do -

Hegdewar  Chowk

Aundha Nagnath

Dr. Mrs. Jyostha Adhe  BAMS

60045

38

     - do -

Near  Grampanchyat

Dr. N.S. Kunte  B.A.M.S.

39

     - do -

Hegdewar  Chowk

Aundha Nagnath

Dr. S.S. Agrawal  D.H.M.S.

60081

40

      - do -

 

Hegdewar  Chowk

Aundha Nagnath

Dr. B.S. Agrawal  D.H.M.S.

60003

41

      - do -

Near  Grampanchyat

Aundha  Nagnath

Dr. R.D. Bonde  D.H.M.S.

42

      - do -

Main  Road,  Aundha

Dr. Sanghai  D.H.M.S.

43

      - do -

Main  Road,  Aundha

Dr. Suresh Gangavane  BAMS

44

      - do -

Main  Road,  Aundha

Dr.  V.U.  Bora  D.H.M.S.

60001

45

      - do -

Main  Road,  Aundha

Dr. P.B. Agrawal D.H.B. Rmp

60025

46

      - do -

Basmat

Dr. Toshniwal       24011

47

      - do -

Basmat

Dr.  Nilchand  Jaswani

24088



48

      - do -

Basmat

Dr. Kishor Gundewar   24090

49

      - do -

Basmat

Dr.  Nillawar                24124

50

      - do -

Basmat

Dr. D.M. Lalpotu           24125

51

      - do -

Basmat

Dr.  Ambekar                 24174

52

      - do -

Basmat

Dr. U.V. Baganagre      24199

53

      - do -

Basmat

Dr. G.S. Agrwal            24317

54

      - do -

Basmat

Dr. Kulkarni                  24319

55

      - do -

Basmat

Dr. Govind Jaswani       24353

56

      - do -

Basmat

Dr.  Lolge                     24360

57

      - do -

Basmat

Dr.  Jogad                     24371

58

      - do -

Basmat

Dr. Mr.&Mrs Sokale    26080

59

      - do -

Basmat

Dr. Roadgegre             

60

      - do -

Basmat

Dr. Panjabrao Kadam

61

      - do -

Basmat

Dr.  Adkine



62

      - do -

Basmat

Dr.  Kapale

63

      - do -

Basmat

Dr. Khan

64

      - do -

Basmat

Dr. Sow Shinde

65

      - do -

Basmat

Dr.  Amdare

66

      - do -

Basmat

Dr.  Sai Pathology        24317 

67

      - do -

Basmat

Dr.  Katki  Pathology    

68

      - do -

Holani Hospital

Jintur

Dr. Holani  M.B.B.S.    24166

69

      - do -

Sabu  Hospital

Jintur

Dr. Sabu   M.B.B.S.       24087

70

      - do -

Agrwal  Hospital

Jintur

Dr. Agrwal  M.B.B.S.   24183

71

      - do -

Khiste  Hospital

Jintur

Dr. Khiste  M.B.B.S.     

72

      - do -

Kadri Hospital

Jintur

Dr. Linkayat Ali Kadri  MBBS

73

      - do -

Chatse Hospital

Jintur

Dr. Chatse  M.D.    



74

      - do -

Bhandari Hospital

Jintur

Dr.  Bhandari B.A.M.S

75

      - do -

Joshi Hospital

Jintur

Dr.  Joshi  D.H.M.S.

76

      - do -

Chandak Hospital

Jintur

Dr. Chandak  M.B.B.S  24205

77

      - do -

Kanje Hospital

Jintur

Dr. Kanje M.B.B.S.

78

      - do -

Pandit  Hospital

Jintur

Dr. Pandit  M.B.B.S.

79

      - do -

Bhagwari Shahu Maharaj

Hospital  Gangakhed

Dr. S.P. Bhalerao      22158

M.D                           22238

80

      - do -

Muktai Hospital

Gangakhed

Dr. M.K. Dhule M.D  23048

81

      - do -

Gundre Hospital

Gangakhed

Dr.  B.P. Gundre         22106

M.B.B.S. DCH COM       

82

      - do -

Joshi Hospital

Gangakhed

Dr. B.C. Joshi  MBBS 22330  

Dr. B.B. Joshi  MBBS

83

      - do -

Loin Club  Madical Association Gangakhed

Shri Babasaheb            22050

Samle (President)       

Shri  Suryakantrao        22025

Chodhary (Secretory)



84

      - do -

Private  Madical Association Gangakhed

Dr. V.N. Thakur (President)

Dr.  Lakhte  (Secretroy)

85

      - do -

Gurukrupa Pathology

Lab,  Sailu

Sow. Seema N. Helaskar  22503

86

      - do -

Bhala Pathology  Lab, Sailu

Satish  Bala 

87

      - do -

Shri  Pathology Lab,

Sailu

Dr. Sow Kalpana Kulkarni

88

      - do -

Nogori  Hospital,  Sailu

Dr. V.N. Nogori  LCEH 22028

89

      - do -

Bangali Hospital, Sailu

Dr. A.K. Roy  AVV       

90

      - do -

Shri Laxmi Santosh Clinic

Sailu

Dr. S.K. Aundhe

Dr. A.S. Aundhe BAMS

91

      - do -

Malani Clinic, Sailu

Dr. S.R.Malani  DHMS 22467

Dr. Subhsh Malani  MBBS

Dr.  Jayshri Malani  MBBS

92

Sailu  X-ray,  Clinic

Dr.  G.K. Fadke  GFAM

93

    - do -

Mamta Clinic, Sailu

Dr. R.D. Mulavekar    22585

BAMS

Dr. Mrs. R.R.Mulavekar MBBS

Dr. M.G. Jogwar



94

      - do -

Vishnu Clinic, Sailu

Dr. Suresh Kulkarni      2243

MBBS  

Dr. Sunil Kulkarni  MBBS

95

      - do -

Pandurang Clinic, Sailu

Dr. A.G. Borade           22190

DHMS

Dr. S.G. Rodge MBBS MS

96

      - do -

Sanjay Clinic, Sailu

Dr. S.D.Deualgaonkar  BHMS

97

      - do -

Shirram Clinic, Sailu

Dr. Shriram Gajmal  CCH

98

      - do -

Ohm Sai Clinic, Sailu

Dr. P.G. Jog  DHMS

99

      - do -

Matrukrupa Clinic, Sailu

Dr. N.T. Kundmani MD 22381

Dr.Sow A.A. Kundmani BAMS  CGO 

100

      - do -

Kaiware Clinic, Sailu

Dr. S.S. Kaiware DHMS

Dr. S.M. Lhiya MBBS DOMS

Dr. Kala S.J. MBBS DORL

101

      - do -

Sanjiwan Clinic, Sailu

Dr.Rajendra Gat  BAMS CCH

Dr.C.K.Sagtani DHMS

102

      - do -

Sai Krupa  Clinic, Sailu

Dr.A.V Manwtkar

MBBS MD

103

      - do -

Dhawantri Clinic, Sailu

Dr. B.B. Rodge          22844

BAMS  DA



104

      - do -

Somani Child Hospital,

Sailu

Dr. Subhodh Somani 

BAMS DCH

105

      - do -

Mathra Dental Hospital,

Sailu

Dr. M.S. Hawle B.D.S.

106

      - do -

Shri Clinic, Sailu

Dr. Shriniwas Kulkanri

MBBS  MD

107

      - do -

Shrdha Clinic, Sailu

Dr. Madhusudan Pathak 22168

MBBS MS

108

      - do -

Aapurva Clinic, Sailu

Dr. S.R. Rodge             22353

MBBS  DGO

Dr.Sow S.R. Rodge  BAMS

109

      - do -

Somani Sargical Maternitiy Hall, Sailu

Dr.Sudha Somani

MBBS DGO

Dr. Subhodh Somani

MBBS DCH

Dr. Shella  Somani 

MBBS DORL

110

      - do -

Dental Hospital, Sailu

Dr.K.J. Jaiswal  L.DSC

Dr. Jogdand  DHMS

Dr. A.L. Deshpande    22254

MBBS MD

Dr. A.A. Deshpande   

MBBS MD

111

      - do -

Purna

Dr. D.R. Wakhmare    52256

MBBS



112

      - do -

Purna

Dr. S.S. Malpani         55345

BAMS

113

      - do -

Purna

Dr. P.C.Soni                 55104

BAMS  

114

      - do -

Purna

Dr. Mutha   DHMS       55282                  

115

      - do -

Purna

Dr.Jahagirdar                 55142

116

      - do -

Purna

Dr. Jhunjare  DHMS      55146

117

      - do -

Purna

Dr. Hilal       DHMS     55341

118

      - do -

Purna

Dr.Deepak Joshi DHMS55132

119

      - do -

Purna

Dr. Thakur   BAMS      55187

120

      - do -

Purna

Dr. Ingole  DHMS        55341

121

      - do -

Purna

Dr. Sanjay Lolge           55216

122

      - do -

Helth Service Centre,

Purna

                                     

                                      55226 

123

      - do -

Railway Hospital, Purna

                                      

                                       55226

124

      - do -

Gurukrupa Clinic, Pathri

Dr. G.S. Kasat  BAMS   

Dr. V.R. Rahi   BAMS   



125

      - do -

Sadguru Clinic ,  Pathri

Dr. R.P. Shikwal          55451

DHMS

126

      - do -

Prasanna Clinic, Pathri

Dr. P.R. Pokhal   BAMS

Dr. Padma Pokhal  BAMS

127

      - do -

Janta Clinic, Pathri

Dr. M.I. Syad              55368 

DEMS  DEH

Dr. A.K. Kulkarni

BAMS

Dr. M.N. Borgaonkar  55217

128

      - do -

Saba Clinic, Pathri

Dr. Abdul Tokiph M.Esak

DHMS

Dr. R.R. Kulkarni 

BAMS

Dr. L.R. Manwatkar

MBBS

129

      - do -

Samarth Clinic, Pathri

Dr. D.L. Chodhari   AVV

130

      - do -

Shilpa Clinic, Pathri

Dr. Aasef Ahmand Khan

BEMS

131

      - do -

Dhanwantri Clinic,Pathri

Dr. Anant Bawiskar  BAMS

132

      - do -

Chabda Hospital, Pathri

Dr. Dhiraj Chabda  MD

Dr.Sow Taruna Chabada DCH

Dr.Aabasaheb Jadhav  BAMS

Dr.Sow Godavari Jadhav BAMS



Annexure-I

Suggested Pro forma for “In” Message

Date :

Sr.No of In Message

Time at which message was

received :

Initials of the person receiving the

message :

Received from

Addressed to :

Text of message :

Message transferred to :   Name                                                  Designation

                                        Date                                                    Time :

Message transferred by :  Name                                                    Designation  

                                        Date                                                    Time :

Instructions/follow-up to be done :



Suggested Pro forma for “In” Message


Date :

Out Message Sr. No :

Time at which message was

sent :

Sr. No of In Message  to which out message relates :

Addressed from

Addressed to

Text of message :

Message transferred to :   Name                                                   Designation

                                        Date                                                      Time :

Message transferred by :  Name                                                   Designation

                                         Date                                                     Time :

Instructions/follow-up to be done :


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